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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, October 05, 1905, Image 1

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AND
VOL. LIV. NO. 302.
THE ARGUS. THURSDAY, OCTOHEK 5, 1905.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
IMPOSSIBLE FOR JAPAN
TO REFUSE RATIFICATION
DESPERATE DUEL
UNIVERSITY
THREATENED
LACKING HARMONY
PEORIA SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS IS INDIGTEI
Two Men Fight to Death With
State Administration Crowd
Not a Happy Fam
ily. is
Vicious Dog Only Witness
ROCK
ISJL
ARGUS
Situation Made Clear to
to Anti-Peace
Party.
PEOPLE STILL FUME
Public Debt When Troops Are
Withdrawn Will be $2,-
250.000,000.
Tokio, Oct. 5. In passing the peace
treaty the privy council has clearly im
pressed the anti-peace agitators the
impossibility of a refusal to ratify it.
The energies of the latter will now
likely be concentrated in an attack on
the cabinet. Public demonstrations ex
pressing national indignation against
the peace treaty will, it is believed.
reaset but this outward expression of
feeling will only create a strong under
current of disaffection.
May ('mine lolenee.
I'nwise resistetice and any attempt
to suppress opinion may. it is feared,
give rise to nets of violence.
Well informed people, while appre
ciating the wisdom of putting a stop
to the war. are indignant at the half
measure policy of the government as
exhibited, for instance, in the partition
of the island of Sakhalin.
(ironlac Impatient.
The pnblic is keetily intent, awaiting
explanation from the government, but
the promise to convene a special ses
sion of the diet immediately after the
conclusion of peace, not having been
fulfilled, is growing impatient.
Former Foreign Minister Okuma,
leader of the progressive party, before
the Associated Chamber of Commerce
today, referring to the sudden expan
sion of Japan's tiuance, said when Its
withdrawal of troops is completed, she
wiil find herself confronted with a debt
of fl.250.000.ooo. the interest on which
alone, roughly speaking, will be $75.
000,000, or nearly twice the revenue of
the country ID years ago.
Tnxea Are Tripled.
The per capita rate of taxation be
fore the war was $2; now it is $G. The
per capita share in the national debt
before the war was $0; now it is $23
Okuma, however, was not pessimistic.
He sKke eloquently of the necessity
of business men redoubling their ener
gy in the developments of productive
works of all kinds and thus secure vic
tories in peace as well as in war.
I'rolei-lrd by I'olloe.
Tokio, Oct. 5. M. Yamaza and H. W.
Denison, members of the peace com
mission, bringing the peace treaty
signed at Portsmouth, arrived here this
evening. Lint few people to meet them
were at the railroad station, owing to
the strict examination made of all per
sons by the military and police who
guarded the station.
MISSOURI LIFTS
QUARANTINE OCT. 7
Fear of Yellow Fever Practically Over
Still Many Cases Re
ported. Warrensburff, Mo., Oct. 5. Secre
tary Adcock of the state board o
health issued an order today that the
quarantine instituted in Missouri be
cause of yellow fever in the south is
rescinded, effective Oct. 7.
New Orleans. Oct. 3. New cases of
yellow fever today numbered IS;
deaths. 2.
DRAG ISSUES IN
Ohio Republicans Fail to Fight
On State Lines Demo
crats Hew to Line.
Columbus, Oct. 5. Chairman Garb
er. of the democratic state committee
today declared the appearance of Sec
retaries Taft, Shaw, and other mem
bers of the president's cabinet will not
change the policy laid out by demo
crats at the beginning of the campaign
to confine the discussion from stump
during the campaign to state Issues.
WHITE DOOMED FOR
CRIMINAL ASSAULT
Russellville. Ky.. Oct. 5 R. X.
Fletcher, (white), convicted of a crim
inal assault on Mary Gladder, a Ger
man girl, was today sentenced to
death.
MAY FIGHT BIG
MAIL ORDER FIRMS
Wholesale Druggists May Refuse to
Sell Them Drugs in Fu
ture. New York. Oct. 5. The National
Wholesale Druggists yesterday elect
ed Lucien B. Hall, of Cleveland, Ohio,
president: W. T. Harper, Jr., of Ot
tumwa, Iowa, vice president, and Jos
eph E. Toms, of Indianapolis, secre
tary'. A statement that the health of
thousands of young women in the rural
districts was annually impaired for life
by drugs which they receive by mail
was made by John G. Gallagher, of
Jersey City who read a communication
from the National Association of Re
tail Druggists. Gallagher appealed to
the wholesalers to refuse to sell their
drugs to firms in the mail order busi
ness who sold vicious and dangerous
drugs through the medium of attract
ive advertising.
ILLINOIS W. C. T. U. SESSION
Four Hundred Present at Opening of
Meeting at Bloomington.
Bloomington. 111.. Oct. 3. Over 400
delegates were present today when
the annual convention of the Illinois
Woman's Christian Temperance Union
was called to order by the president.
Miss Carrie C. Brehm. The day's pro
gram consisted of religious services.
The business sessions commence to
morrow. ST. AMANT WINS BIG RACES
Jockey Club Stakes of $50,000 Award
ed at London.
London. Oct. 3. The race for the
Jockey club stakes of f30,0oo for three
year olds and upwards, mile and three-
quarters, at New Market today was
won by St. Amant, Polymetus, second,
Mondamin, third. Six horses started.
FEAR FOR TARIFF
Likelihood Democratic House
Would Change it Scared
Financiers.
INSURANCE WITNESS SAYS
Paid $2,500 of Mutual Funds
Chairman of the Republican
Committee.
to
New York. Oct. 3. W. F. Thumrael,
legal counsel for the Mutual Life In
surance company, of New York, testi
fied before the legislative investigation
committee today that he had received
f2.50 from Vice President Grannis in
1904, had paid it personally to the
chairman of the republican congres
sional campaign committee.
I-'enred Deiuoerntle llounr.
Thummei said the contribution had
been suggested by the "danger of a
democratic house that would result in
tariff and other legislation of such char
acter as would upset business and af
fect the policy holders." Other compa
nies, Thummei said had been asked to
contribute, but he did not know wheth
er they did or not.
w !peeiMl liranil Jury.
New York. Oct. 3. District Attorney
Jerome decided today he will not have
an, extraordinary jury to investigate
insurance matters at present. Later
he said he might present the matter to
the grand Jury.
!ajB He 111 I'ru.rrutc
New York. Oct. 5. District Attorney
Jerome announced in a statement to
Justice I.evy in the supreme court to
day that he intended after the legisla
tive investigating committee had com
pleted its work to present to an extra
ordinary grand jury revelations affect
ing the conduct of the life insurance
business which has been made before
the committee. Jerome said the in
quiry by this committee has shown
greater moral obtuseness on the part
of the persons important in the busi
ness world than did "the shocking reve
lations in regard to the Equitable."
W. R. HEARST FOR MAYOR
Municipal Ownership People Nominate
Him at New York.
New York. Oct. 5. William Ran
dolph Hearst was named as candidate
for mayor at a municipal ownership
mass meeting last night.
Heads Daughters of America.
Boston, Oct. 5. The national coun
cil of the Daughters of America yester
day elected Mrs. Elizabeth Sewell. of
the District of Columbia, as national
councilor.
Warrant Was Signed.
Montreal. Oct. 5. A warrant of sur
render for Gaynor and Greene was
signed by the attorney eeneral at Que
bec yesterday afternoon.
IN LONELY MINNESOTA WOODS
Use Knife and Gun Bodies Found
Badly Mutilated 900 Feet
Apart.
Duluth. Minn.. Oct. 5. With no other
witnesses than a vicious dog. two men
James Canty, a timber cruiser, and
Gus Lahti, a homesteader, fought a
duel to the death Saturday afternoon
at Taber, 17 miles north of Hibbing
Details of the battle will never be
known, but from the appearance of the
scene the struggle must have been
fierce, the ground being torn up over a
wide surface. Both bodies were badly
mangled.
1'ned (inn and Knife.
Canty left Welsh's camp, near Taber.
Saturday afternoon, and it is supposed
that he was either attacked by Lahti's
dog or had angered Lahti by crossing
the line of his homestead.
The presumption is that Lahti at
tacked Canty with a knife, giving Can
ty several deep cuts about the head
and body. Lahti also carried a gun,
with which he shot his opponent in the
breast. Canty evidently wrenched the
knife away, as Iahtl was also badly
cut.
Had Never .Met Ilefore.
The former was also chewed about
the legs by the dog. When the men
were nearly dead, apjearances indicate
that they separated and took different
directions, the bodies being found 900
feet apart. Canty was missed at the
camp in the evening and was found
by a searching party the next day.
Lahti's body was not found until Tues
day. The men had never met before.
GO TO STUDY OWNERSHIP
Meeting of Civic Federation Held to
Fix Objects of European Trip.
New York, Oct. 5. Many prominent
men met here today to determine what
phase of the municipal ownership prob
lem as it appears in Europe shall be
studied by the commission which will
be sent abroad representing the Na
tional Civic federation. Samuel Com
pers was present. August Belmont,
president, sent a letter to the conven
tion outlining the purpose of the com
mission. LANCASTER IS PRESIDENT
United States Railway Mail Service
Benefit Association Elects.
Cincinnati. Oct. 5. The United States
Railway Mail Service Mutual Benefit
association has elected C. E. Lancaster,
Kansas City, president; vice president,
J. C. Koons, Washington ; secretary
treasurer, W. C. Corning, Chicago.
INVESTIGATION OF
PRINTING OFFICE
President Will Order It for Purpose of
Reducing Operating Ex
penses. Washington, Oct. 5. President
Roosevelt had a talk yesterday with
Representative Landis of Indiana on
the work of the commission which is
to investigate the conditions in the gov
ernment printing office with a view to
reducing the expenses of the operation
of the big printing plant. The mem
bers of the commission are said to be
lieve it easily pos-sible to reduce the
expense of tne government printing
office at least $1,000,000 a year.
KANSAS MOB IS DANGEROUS
Threatens Lives of Three Persons
Held for Death of Child.
Fort Scott, Oct. 5. Mrs. Belle Hig-
gins, her daugnter, Clarissa, ana nus-
band, George, held by the coroner's
jury for the death of Higgins' son by a
former wife, were taken to Girrard last
night for safe keeping, a mob having
threatened to storm the jail.
SHIP IN DANGER
Vessel Supposed to be St. Paul
Almost on Rocks at
Eureka, Calif.
Eureka, Cal.. Oct. 5. A large passen
ger steamer, believed to be the St.
Paul, which left San Francisco yes
terday, i3 leported ia trouble danger
ously close in shore one and a half
miles below Point Gorda.
The news was received by telephone
and gives only meagre details.
The message came from Petroli, sev
eral miles this side of Gorda, and stat
ed many passengers were in sight on
deck, but the name of the steamer
could not be distinguished oa account
of the haze. The tugboat Ranger has
left for the scene with a life-saving
I crew.
Russian Students Not
Contented With Re
cent Reforms.
LISTEN TO AGITATORS
Prospects Are All Large Insti
tutions of Learning Will
Be Closed.
St. Petersburg. Oct. 5. Despite the
grant of au.onomy, placing the admin
istration and policy of universities in
the hands of elected recluse and coun
cils of professors, who are thoroughly
in sympathy with reform work, the ed
ucational situation is darkening and
there are prospects that the hot headed
zeal of student reformers and the ac
tivity of non-student agitators at stud
ent meetings may lead to another sus
pension of work, at the universities.
One I'nlverNily floNeit.
Prince Troubotsky, rector of Mos
cow university, who is the foremost lib
eral in Russia, has with the approval
of the council of professors already
been forced to close that university
temporarily owing to the packing of
student assemblies by outside agita
tors. The council of St. Petersburg
university has warned students that
the participation of outsiders in their
meetings should be stopped. The
same state of affairs is reported at
Odessa and other universities.
Hojeott ProfeMMorM.
St. Petersburg students have insti
tuted a boycott of several professors
who are disliked on account of their
lolitical opinions and have broken up
their classes by disorder.
DAMAGED BY FIRE
Rhinelander, Wis , Swept
Blaze That Covers $600,
000 Loss.
by
STARTS IN LUMBER YARD
Spreads to Residence District, Burns
75 Houses and Leaves 400
Homeless.
Rhinelander, Wis.. Oct. 5. Fire in
the lumber district of this town last
evening destroyed property valued at
$000,000 and rendered 400 people home
less. The fire started in the lumber
yard of Brown Bros., and after sweep
ing that yard clean, spread to the Rob
bins company's yards which were en
tirely destroyed.
FlrurtarN ltealdeoce Huurler.
A high wind carried the fire into
the residence district adjoining the
lumber yards, destroying 75 dwelling
houses. Forty million feet of lumber
was destroyed. After burning over the
greater portion of eight blocks, the fire
was got under control late last evening.
The homeless people were cared last
night in the city hall and other public
buildings.
Partly Insured.
The total insurance is about $400,
000. The principal losers- are: Brown
Bros'. Lumber company, lumber, $250,
00O, insurance $175,000; Bobbins Lum
ber company. $225,000, insurance $1C5.
000. Two school houses and an engine
house, $25,000. Loss of dwellings. $75,
ooo. HASTE TO SETTLE
BRITISH CLAIMS
Presence of Cruiser Facilitates Action
by Turkish Authorities in Red .
Sea Case.
Constantinople, Oct. 5. The pres
ence of the British cruiser Fox at Ho
delda, Turkish Arabia, has resulted in
a speedy settlement of all British
claims in connection with piratical at
tacks of Arabs on British dnows in the
Red sea.
Jerry Simpson's Chances Good.
Wichita, Oct. 5. The physician at
tending ex Congressman Jerry Simp
son, said today Simpson bad a good
chance to get out of bed again and the
prospects for temporary recovery, at
least, are bright.
Floating Pool Room Loses License.
Chicago. Oct. 5. The government li
cense for the so-called "floating pool
room" steamer City of Tracers was to
day revoked.
SHERMAN GETS FEDERAL JOB
Lieutenant Governor and Howland J.
Hamlin Can Net Come to Agree
ment with Richard Yates.
The much advertised triple alliance
projected by the state administration
forces and devised as a scheme to de
feat Senator Cullom for reelection
probably will be broken. As the re
sult of conferences held yesterday the
chances are that neither Lieut. Gov.
Sherman nor former Attorney General
Hamlin will be parties to the Yates
conspiracy to defeat Cullom.
Mr. Sherman has been tendered the
interstate commerce eommissionership
to succeed Joseph W. Fifer. whose res
ignation will take effect Jan. 1. It is
learned "on high authority that Mr.
Sherman will accept and that his
views respecting the senatorship will
be reflected a week or 10 days hence
in a statement which will be given out
by Senator Orville F. Berry, of Han
cock county. Senator Berry is a close
friend of Mr. Sherman and represents
(he same senatorial district.
Hamlin May He Jmlicr.
.The deal with Sherman ha been
virtually closed, but no definite ar
rangement, has been made with Mr.
Hamlin, although assurance is given
by Cullom leaders that the Shelbv
county man will be satisfactorily cared
for. It is suggested that Mr. Hamlin
may be appointed a federal judge in
the District of Columbia, but. at any
rate, what are regarded as sufficient
inducements will be offered him to
quit the senatorial race.
The Hamlin situation is somewhat
clouded, but it is regarded as morally
certain that Sherman is already out of
the senatorial contest and that in due
time the western Illinois counties, for
which he is spokesman, will give their
support to Senator Cullom.
It is also learned that the proposi
tion to make Sherman Fifer's succes
sor has been under consideration for
.several weeks. The crisis was reach
ed last night when Senators Cullom
and Hopkins, Speaker Cannon of the
national house of representatives. Unit
ed States Marshal Hitch. Mr. Hamlin.
Senator Berry and other representa
tives of Senator Cullom and Lieut.Gov.
Sherman met in conference in the Ice
land hotel. It i3 reported that Senator
Cullom and Speaker Cannon promised
to use their influence to land the inter
state commerce eommissionership for
Sherman.
MOLINE MAN ONE
OF VICE PRESIDENTS
T. W. Sechker Honored by National
Association of Carriage
Builders.
Philadelphia, Oct. 5. Freight rates
and labor organizations were discussed
today at the final session of the con
vention of Carriage Builders' National
association. Officers were elected.
Among the vice presidents were
Charles C. Hill. Connersville, Ind., T.
W. Sechler. of Moline, 111., and Maurice
Connelly of Dubuque.
LA CROSSE MAN USES GUN
Shot Members of Family After Wife
Refused a Reconciliation.
Sparta, Wis., Oct. 5. A man named
Labell came here from La Crosse and
seriously shot his wife, three children
and his father-in-law. John Crowley.
Labell went to the Crowley home to
persuade Mrs. Labell to return lo La
Crosse with him.
Senator's Daughter Marries.
Washington, Oct. 5. Miss Mabel
Clara Money, the youngest daughter of
Senator and Mrs. Money, of Missis
sippi was married last night to Dr
Wiliiam Whitney Kitchen, of Buffalo,
N. V.
STREEDJN DUEL?
New Evidence Indicates An
other Was Shot at Time
of Cambridge Tragedy.
Cambridge, 111., Oct. . Details of
the mysterous death of Attorney John
V. Streed are gradually coming to light,
which tend to show the lawyer was
slain in an impromptu revolver duel
fought in the night. Indications are at
least two bullets were fired and two
persons wounded. That developments
point strongly to the murder theory is
admitted frankly in official circles. It
seema now pretty well established the
attack on Streed was the result of a
series of efforts at blackmail among .
gang which had been operating here
for a long time.
ACCIDENTS THICK
AT BROOKLYN FIRE
Five Fatally Injured, Automobile
Wrecked and Child Born in
Street.
New York. Oct. 5. As a result of a
fire in a four-story Hat in Reid avenue.
Brooklyn, late last night. Mr. andMrs.
Jeremiah Donnelly are dying at a hos
pital, having inhaled flames, their three
young children were burned to death,
five other tenants are suffering from
burns, and two firemen, William Teas
and Christopher Leary. were seriously
injured in rescuing the other occu
pants. Other incidents of the fire were the
birth of a child in the street while the
mother was being remove 1 from the
burning building, and an accident
which wrecked Fire Chief Crocker's
automobile, and in which the chief nar
rowly escaped serious- injury. The fire
is believed to have been incendiarv.
CONGRESSMAN IS ACCUSED
By Jewish Fraternal Society of Which
He is Grand Master.
New York. Oct. 5. The Associated
Ex-Presidents of the Order of Brith
Abraham, a fraternal insurance order
with a membership of 50.000. adopted
resolutions yesterday condemning thr
administration of Congressman Henry
K. Goldfogle, its grand master, a pro
test was sent to the legislative investi
gating committee and to the state in
surance department.
BURGLARS IN SOUTH DAKOTA
Rob Bank at Springfield of $5,200 and
Make Good Escape.
Springfield, S. D.. Oct. 5. Early to
day burglars entered the bank of
Springfield, blew the vault and escaped
with $5,200 cash.
READS A LESSON
J . Edward Simmons Talks on Age
of Dishonesty to Maryland
Bankers.
WARNING IN OTHER NATIONS
Frequent Use of Terms "Graft" and
"Grafter" Held an Alarming
Symptom.
Annapolis, Md., Oct. 5. Dishonesty
in high places, in state, judiciary anil
great financial institutions and corpor
ations and the palliation of such acts
by t lie masses gravely threaten the fu
ture of the country, according to views
expressed today by J. Edward Sim
mons, president of the Fourth National
bank of New York, in an address be
fore the Maryland Bankers' associa
tion. " l.rNHiiim ia l"al.
He pointed to the lessons taught by
the fall of the ancient Roman republic,
the reign tf terror in France, and dis
orders which befell the Russians in
the recent conflict in the far east, all
of which, he said, were due to palliates!
dishonesty.
He deplored the conditions which
have led to the toleration of the terms
of "graft" and "grafters," and said he
feared the very use of the words was
an indication of men's toleration of the
thief and his trade.
A.kM Aulitor to AmmIh(.
He called upon the members of the
association to give their assistance to
remedying a condition which makes it
possible "for men who pose as the sal!
of the earth and who condemn, with
out reserve, those who steal $50 or
forge a check for $Ho, or accept a
bribe, to themselves make millions by
lying, by misrepresentation, by fiaud,
and by bribery." without receiving pun
ishment or even criticism, while the
one who steals a paltry sum is sent to
jail.
Private Sulnl, I'ul.lle Villain.
He denounced the man of stainless
private life, who, "in the interest of
corporations, trusts, gas, railroad and
insurance companies have recourse to
every villainy damned in the deca
logue, who does the deed of the high
wayman with the air of a saint."
RAISIN PRICES ARE HIGHER
New Schedule of California Monopoly
on Sweatbox Basis.
Fresno, Cal., Oct. 5 The California
Raisin Growers' company has announc
ed prices it will ask for raifcins this
year. The prices were never higher
bffore except in VMM when extremely
high prices caused the disaster to the
o'.l association. The new schedule is
on what is known as oa the sweat
box basis.
N. C. Dougherty Accused
of Series of Forg
eries.
IN OFFICE MANY YEARS
Peculations During Long Period
Said to Reach Hundreds
of Thousands.
Peoria. III.. Oct. 5 N. C. Dougherty,
for many years city superintendent of
schools and one of t ho most promin
ent educators in the1 country, is under
arrest following an indictment by the
grand jury charging forgery.
Itelfiineil on ninl.
Dougherty was released on $2,000
bond. His arrest follows the most as
tounding revelations by the grand Jury
now in session, which has been exam
ining the books of the Peoria school
board. Within a comparatively brief
space of time a shortage of $75,000 wai
discovered, but the further discovery
was made that the peculations had
been extending over a long term of
years.
Miorlimr Hum IHkIi.
The shortage will reach hundreds of
thousands of dollars. In order to cause
the arrest of Dougherty, the grand jury
made a partial report this morning.
SPRINGFIELD NEXT YEAR
Illinois Prohibitionists Will Hold
State Convention There.
Springfield. III.. Oct. 5. The pro
hibition state central commiftwe met
yesterday and de-cidel to hold next
year's state convention here April IS.
There will be about 1,500 delegates.
BISHOP SPALDING COMING
Returns to Peoria from South to Re
sume Labors Saturday.
Bishop Spalding will reach his home
in Pe'oria. Saturday. Ho is now in
Louisville, where ho will remain one
day. He will also stop at Indianapolis
on his trip homeward. The bishop has
been, much Improved by hisi sojourn in
the south. Much of his time there
was spent out of doors, and he himself
is so confident of his strength that he
will take up the active duties of I ho
head of the Peoria diocese upon his ar.
rival here.
TUBERCULOSIS CURE
PUBLIC IN AUGUST
Prof. Behring, Discoverer of Diphthe
ria Serum Claims Important
Find.
Paris, Oct. 5. Prof. Behring, discov
erer of anti-diphtheria serum, announc
es he has found a cure fer tuberculo
sis, the nature of which he will divulge
next August.
SUICIDES UNDER A TRAIN
Unidentified Man's Clothes Bore Trade
Mark of Flora, III., Firm.
St. Louis, Oct. 5. An unidentified
man was decapitated in the yards of
the Iron Mountain road today, having
jumped tinder a moving freight train
with suicidal Intent. His clothing bore
the trade mark of a Fhra. ill., firm.
ALL MAY GO OUT
Grand Trunk Road Likely to be
Tied Up With Switch
men's Strike.
Chicago. Oct. 5. Eighty per cent of
the switchmen employed by the Grand
Trunk railway between Chicago and
the Canadian border may be called out
on strike within 21 hours.
Grand Master Hawley of the Switchmen's-
Cnion of America, who came to
Chicago yesterday in the hope of ne go
tiating with the head of the Grand
Trunk for a settlement of the strike at
the Elsdon yards failed, an 1 made the
foregoing statement today.
WEDDING IN HIGH
LIFE IN EUROPE
Berlin, Oct. 5. A dispatch from
Munich today announced that the di
vorced Grand Duchess Victoria of
Hesse and Grand Duke Cyril of Rus
sia were married there quietly four
days ago.

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