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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, August 17, 1907, Image 4

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THE ARGUS. SATURDAY. AUGUST 17. 1907.
THE ARGUS.
ever, proposes to go further than any
body else has attempted, by showing
OUR AMERICAN PRESIDENTS.
Published Dally and Weekly at 1621. an automatic typewriting machine in
tfecond avenue. Rock Island, I1L fEn- operation that will do away with sten-
10 CENTS
tercd at the postofflce aa second-class
ographers, typewriter girls and all the
employes of an ofllce that are now
considered necessary in carrying on
the correspondence of a great estab
lishment. matter.
By THE J. W. POTTER CO.
1 WlWWyiTCWjwa-BCT
c. I.
c. I.
FN
TERMS Dally, 10 cents per week.
Weekly, $1 per year In advance.
All communications of argumentative
character, political or religious, must
have real name attached for publica
tion. No such articles will be printed
over fictitious signatures.
Correspondence solicited from every
township In Rock Island county.
Saturday, August 17, 1907.
If the strike lasts Ions:
can live on current pie.
the operators
Or course the messenger bovs walk
ed out. They never run.
Now they say Uncle Sam is after the
kodak trust. The combine will nega
tive his efforts.
It Is gravely announced that Wall
street operators "have lost all patience
with money." Now, what do you think
of that?
There must be something more tin n
Small .success to keep the strike oper
ators keyed up to the proper point ;u
the present crisis.
In Pittsburg they are killing snakes
on the public streets or they think
they are. We feared it would come to
this! Riches and indulgence!
In Chicago llaring billboard adver
tisements warn against drink. Curious
that some well-intentioned people don't
know what drives one to drink.
The partial report of the bureau of
corporations more than confirms all
that the democrats charged against the
Standard Oil trust which the republi
cans as stieuuously deukd.
John D. Rockefeller has been a re
publican ami a liberal contributor to
his party campaign funds, so the re
publican party fixed it up in the Klkins
bill that there was to be no imprison
ment for rebating.
It is too bad that Harry Lehr did
not ininK or the lenity hoar stunt so
that he could again be declared the
wizard of the social world. If Harry
does not make gHd before very long,
Rome one will be mean enough to say
that his originality has been harried
out.
Now that three Denecn men have
been discovered wandering aimlessly
around in this county, there is a lurking
suspicion that they will bolt and estab
lish a new party. The sum and sub
stance of their platform would also re
quire only three words: "Hurrah for
Dencen."
It was a singular election they had
in the Philippines the other day. It
was so manifestly fair that there have
been no cries of fraud and no deiyauds
for u recount. No wonder the rcpubli
can leaders consider it an evidence of
the total unpreparedness of the Fili
pinos for self-government.
If the newspapers of the country d
not wield sufficient influence to "bust"
the paper trust that is already staii.i
ing over the publisher with one han.l
on his throat and the other on his po-:
ktt book, they might, as well feed flu
theory of power of the press as well
as the cash earnings to the hogs.
Another rod with which to make th.
Standard Oil trust be good is the su ;
gettion to knock out the tariff tax of
something like 100 per cent which
keeps oil from the Caspian region ux
of this country. It is true that this tar
iff is in retaliation for a similar one
against our oil, but. coupled with 'e
bates, it has enabled the oil trust :
do about as it pleases in this country.
The following advertisement appear,,
in the Oxford, Iowa Mirror: "Having
tired of my business my meat market
and slaughter-house are for sale. Peo
ple ha.ve used me rough, and I want to
leave Oxford Junction, therefore my
business is for sale. Also please ca'l
nd settle for the meat you have i-l
ready eaten and haven't paid for. Come
and pay your accounts, and If you want
to buy the business, come at once.
August Tech."
There is going to be a big business
show in New York City, and it will
bring to the attention of the public sev
eral new and important inventions.
There will be cash carriers, cash regis
ters, loose leaf ledgers, and a thousand I
other things more or less familiar toj
the business public. One man, how-j
noun l iu I CrupK Certain.
The last government estimate as to
growing crops for this year since the
next report will deal with certainties
has been issued. It shows that winter
wheat will yield nearly as much as last
year, the estimate being '.to. 5 per cent,
and the estimates are usually too low
rather than too high. Spring wheat is
not so favorable, showing only 7!.4 per
cent, a falling oft from the 87.2 percent
rciortccl last month, which is now ex
plained. Corn is estimated at S2.S, while the
10-yinr average is but ami the
average corn crop is rather greater
than the farmers could handle to ad
vantage. The yield indicated this year
is 2,(;ts.i;7o,(MMt bushels, which is cer
tainly enough to avert any shortage.
Oats, rye, barley and buckwheat all av
erage high, while that important staple,
the potato crop, is -above the Id year
average.
On the whole, the indications are
that all the crops will be good, and the
greatest uncertainty about them is
whither enough labor can be secured to
harvest them without loss. Already
money is going west to move them, al
though this is not so important as for
merly, since the west now has almost
enough money to move its own crops.
The outlook is distinctly favorable.
s in other branches of business, farm
ing, which is largely the basis of all, i.-
prospi tons this year, and promises con
tinued prosperity all around.
Some Iiegal Klietoiie.
Again we have abundant evidence
that tiie art ot the rhetorician is not
forever lost. The English language
deftly woven into euphonious combina
tions still has its subtle, persuasive ef-
eels. The deeds of the nation's hc-
oes can be extolled ami the spirit of
patriotism aroused only when the eagle
s allowed to llap its wings to the ac-
ompaiiinieiit of its own schrill scream.
Even the legislature of Illinois, dull
ed by polities and its hiuher sensibili
ties ruined by sordid routine, is not
immune to the shafts of vigorous and
forceful English. The legL-lators, slow
to appropriate the people's money, has
tened to vote $C..0ni for a monument to
(iciicral ; oriio Kouers Clark after tin.
following bill, every word of which
breathes the truest patriotism, was
submitted for their consideration:
'General George Rogers Clark, with
prophetic vision, was enabled during
he revolutionary period ot our historv
to s-ce in that great legion lying be
tween the Ohio, the great lakes, and
the Mississippi, a territorv of most
strategic value, boundless wealth and
wondrous opportunity, and who, by the
authority of the council of Virginia
statesmen, composed of Patrick Henry,
Thomas Jefferson, George Mason, and
George Wythe, at almost inconceivable
peril to himself and his followers,
swipt it free from marauding band and
lurking toe. ami organized it as a coun
ty of the Old Dominion, throunh the
munificence of that commonwealth.
and by the provisions of the ordinance
of 17S7, drafted by Jefferson, it became
the northwest territory, a portion, in
lNi!i, was made the territory of Illi
nois, ami from this conception was
hoi n. in ISIS, Illinois, fairest of the
sisterhood of states. More than a cen
tury has gone by, and as yet no fitting
tribute to the memory and achieve
ments of this remarkable man. Thoro-
ore. be it enacted, etc."
Thus was the territory of Illinois
wrested
Britain.
from the grasp of Great
RECORD OF COURT HOUSE.
Real Estate Transfers.
Samuel W. P.uriow to John Pearso i
lot 7, block :. Smith & White's
addi-
tion, Moline Heights, $2,(mmi.
Mary E. Williams Anderson to John
L. Hartman west in feet lots 1 and 2.
block 2. Ryder & Read's addition, M--line,
$2.1100.
Charles Mellugh lo Township of
South Rock Island, lot 5, Ackin's sub
division of the middle 1-U of south ',
Sec. 2, 17. 2 west. $1.
John I). Peedicr to John Covwe!.;
lot o, block 2. Reecher &. Walsh's ad
dition, Rock Islam, $ ',o.
Licensed to Wed.
Charles Slater Colona. Ill
Theresa P.urtis Colona. II.
John P. Creen Galesbnrg. lit.
Marcia lirockway Galcsburg. IP.
SPORTS
Kennedy's Laxative Cough Syrup
acts gently upon the bowels and clears
the whole system of coughs and colds.
Ir promptly relieves inflammation of
thu throat and allays irritation. Sold
by all druggists.
Are You Bilious?
Yellow complexion, dull eyes, sick
headache, constipation, coated tongue,
bad taste in the mouth are indications
that the bile needs regulating.
Your liver will work properly after
you have taken a few doses of
Joeechamtt
mm
Sold everywhere. InboxeslOcandHac.
pi -
j
t-1sr mil
52 -WSTJfc.
It f
I I ' '
ifki t
I ' ,
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I ft 1 t sSr? .
AY A "?Kf
JAMES KNOX POLK.
The eleventh president of tiie United States was a native of Mecklenburg
county, N. but spout most of bis life as a citizen of Tennessee. He served
fourteen years in congress, was speaker for two terms anil was elected gov
ernor of Tennessee in is:!'.. He was elected president in 1M4, defeating
Henry Clay. Polk was a Democrat. During his presidency the Oregon
boundary dispute was set'Ied an.l the Mexican war was fought. In private
life President Polk was unostentatious, frank and courteous. lie died at
Nashville. Tenn., in IN-l'.t, a few mouths after his retirement from the presi
dency, at the age of fifty-five.
DAILY STORY
OUR SUMMER OUTING.
Orisln.il.
I dread the coming round of the
vacation season. AH tin world takes
Iti vacation in July ami August, ami
to secure rooms on-? must set about
it when the beautiful snow is waltz
ing. Theft you must lix your thoughts
on forest or field, mountain or ocean,
wlU'U you would prefer to stay at
home aiul snuggle up to tin lire. If
you don't act then, when the thermom
eter stands at V7 degrees in the shade
you must stay at home and roast.
Molly loves thw mountains, I the
ocean. The t-onseipicnco was that this
year when we sat down together to
tix on ! summer resort we disagreed.
I am sorry to admit that we ipiarreled.
The end of it all was that Molly said
that since I was so unreasonable I
could 0 -where I liked; she was going
to the mountains. And so she did.
I went to the seashore.
I reached my place of rest when
a cold northeaster was blowing. The
guests in the house where I stopped
were huddled together in the sitting
room, grumbling at the proprietor for
not givii.g them a fire. I strolled
out ou to the lieach and stood looking
on the dreary waste of Hying clouds
and rolling waters. The only happy
thing In sight was a sea gull sailing
lietween lmth. I went back to tiie
hotel, sat down in my overcoat and
smoked smoked all day, smoked till
my nerves were in the condition of Hie
tumbling waters. That night 1 didn't
sleep for two reasons immoderate
smoking and the cold. I slept, under
a sheet and a light blanket. I couldn't
get any more. There was another
reason for my Insomnia I was lone
some without Molly, but I would
never have admitted It to her. P.o
sides, I pined for the dry mountain air.
Th second day was like the first,
at least till noon, when I boarded a
train and started to join Molly in the
mountains. I spent the afternoon try
ing to think of n reason, not a truth
ful one, to give her for doing so. 1
reached her habitation at 10 o'clock
at night, alas, to learn that she had
gone away from it that morning.
. "You see," said the landlord, "we've
been having beastly weather here, and
your wife got to thinking of the bright
sun shining on the sands and the
waves, and she said she couldn't stand
It here. She must go to you."
Well, there was nothing to do but go
to lied and take the train back the next
day. lint in the morning 11k; sen rose
bright and beautiful, gilding the peaks
and leaving ihe valleys in contrasting
shadows. The air whs crisp and brac
ing. After all, Molly was right. My
obstmacy was melted by the sunshine.
I sent her the followiug telegram:
Am here. You vfcro risht. Come back.
About 11 o'clock I received one:
Am here. TViM wait for you to come
back.
"I wonder," I remarked sotto voce,
"if that infernal sun lias taken it into
his changeable hot head to come out
at tin; seashore as well as here."
What was I to do? What would Mol
l.r do? My experience with my dear
wife gave me to understand that her
reasoning would be something like
this: "My husband is a man, and men
are all obstinate. I'm not going to give
in to him. I'm here, and here I'll stay.
If he had leen sensible at the outset,
this wouldnt have happened." The
reader may not understand this last
statement, but I do. because I'm used
to woman's logic that Is, Molly's logic.
Thus thinking, I took the next train
for the seashore, first telegraphing, of
course, that I would do so. I struck n
A
r
7
If
v. , i
tei.,H yjK
ernoon. The sun went hack tinder t!:e
clouds, and by the time 1 reached the
ocean I was greeted by the most dis
mal sound in the world, a fog horn. At
the hotel I found my teleirram to Mol
ly (unopened), but mt Molly. She had
gone to join me in the mountains.
"Yon see." said the landlord, "the
sun rose char this morning, and the
air was very soft. Your wife decided
to stay here and telegraphed you. Rut
by 10 o'clock the fog came in, and she
went right away."
"It was th" fog," I remarked. "Noth
ing else would have done it."
Well, I was mad. I was mad from
the crown of my head to the sole of
my foot. I was mad mentally, phys
ically and in my very s nil.
"What's the next train for the city?"
I gvowli-d.
"In an hour."
"Send that trunk back to the sta
tion right off-right off," I said; "not a
moment's de'.ay."
That night at lit o'el iek I was sifting
in ii iy comfortable den at home, with
a cold supper and a bottle of ale be
fore me, a cigar ready in a box on the
table, when I beard a carriage stop at
the front door, then a latchkey turning.
I stood on the landing looking down
stairs. It was Molly.
"You here:'' she said. I could tell
from her tone that she was very angry.
"Yes. You too?"
"Of all the stupid, obstinate, iueor
rigable men I ever knew you are the
worstt"
"Are you hungry, dear?"
"Starving!"
"1 picked no some cold tongue and
other things on my way home. Come
up."
She came up (uot smiling; oh. no, she
didn't smile!), but when she had fin
ished hall a tongue and drunk some
ale she felt better and remarked:
"This is the last summer I'm goin
to make myself uncomfortable by go
ing away. How nice the house does
look!"
"Just so," I remarked, lighting
cigar. "You see, my dear, it wasn't
that I was so obstinate, but that the
weather was so changeable."
1". A. MITCH EL.
New Ships Not Up-to-Date.
l'ritish naval experts regard reciprol
eating engines as out of date and ex
press great surprise that the United
States is laying down two big battle
ships to be filled wilh this kind of en
gines instead of turbines, instead oi
expel inicnting with unknown remedies
for ailments of the stomach, liver and
bowels, why not gel a bottle of Hos
tetter's Stomach 1 litters at once? It
has bei n the recognized standard anion?
medicines for all such disord rs for
over 51 years, and as it always pays to
et Ihe best insist on having Hoste
tor's. In hundreds of cases it has ef
fected a cure win n all others had fail
cd, so that you need not doubt its abil
ity in your case. Try H if you suffer
from poor appelite, cramps, diarrhoe
sleeplessness, dyspepsia, indigestion, fe
male ills or malarial fever. It is pure
and will do you a world of good.
When you want a quick cure without
any loss of time, and one that is followed
by no bad results, use
Chamberlain's
Colic, Cholera and
Diarrhoea Remedy
It never fails and is pleasant to take.
It is equally valuable for children. It is
famous for its cures over a large part ol
1 1 ii
.1 1 VJ
: 11
All
the civilized world.
THAT'S ALL IT NOW COSTS TO GO TO THIS BEAUTIFUL RESORT.
TAKE THE RED LINE CAR (TH PD AVENUE) TO END OF LINE IN
MOLINE AND CHANGE TO RED OPEN CAR GOING EAST.
A GRAND RIDE OF NEARLY 15 MILES AND IT ONLY COSTS A DIME.
TOMORROW SUNDAY THERE'LL BE MUSIC. DANCING, BASE
BALL GAME, BATHING, BOATING, AND MANY OTHER AMUSEMENTS.
MEALS AND REFRESHMENTS SERVED AT THE "HOUSE IN THE
WOODS."
MOTHERS BEFORE SCHOOL STARTS HAVE A PICNIC OUT HERE
AND LET THE CHILDREN HAVE A BIG ROMP ON THE GRASS AND
THROUGH THE COOL WOODS. TAKE THE TROLLEY TO
C. I.
UP TO THE FINALS.
(Continued From Page Three.)
tilul sample of golf. They played from
scratc h and made I he round in 7", six
under bogey, which won for them the
medals awarded for this event. The
record for the course is 71, which
makes this two-man exhibition th-'
more creditable.
Egan, in speaking of the play, gave
Edwatds a good share of the glory. He
r-aid that out of the six mistakes mad.;
Edwards was responsible for only two.
Egan piayi i! as few be ides himself are
capable of doing, and Edwards put up
a tine game and gave a splendid ex
hibition on the putting green.
l.eon and Ardo Mitchell played as a
loam with Egan and Edwards am!
turned in the second gros score so.
I le'ir playing was good but they cou
nual'y fell short on tin putting green.
Had it not been for the mistakes mad-:
there, the twiiia' score would have been
but little inferior to the Chicago bos.
peculiar incident occurred on tin
pasture, where Ia'oii made a putt ot
ihoni 1.1 feet. The ball stopped on the
very ougo ot I lie cup ami H seemoa a
though it would never go in. Howev1
it was noticed that it was moving an t
ifter a breathless watch of at least ::n
seconds, the ball sank into the hole.
! of Tno Trains.
The score card of the two teams fol
lowf.:
Out:
Egan Edwards .1 I 4 3 " , 4-
andA Mitchell 1 .1 :J 4 7 1 .1 I 1-
-II
-12
Houoy f i 4 4 C .1 u '-
In:
Egan Edwards X, 4 4 5 ". .1 :! 4-
and A Mitchell 7 I .1 .1 ;'. 1 4
4.::)
l :y
Rogev (I ,1 t .1 'i .1 I
i 1 .1 I
field
wire
The rest of the
played we'l.
made whitU
Many good scores
are noted in I iie accoiupain ing laoie.
For those who do not know the de
ference between "two-ball foursome
uul the onlinarv game of golf it miv
be stated that in the former two men
alternate in driving the same ball in
stead of each individual using a sep
arate ball. Usually two teams of two
men each play together.
Kkiiii ii Worthy linmpioii.
Chandler Kuan is a youth of yea is.
He graduated from Harvard university
when only 'Jl years ot age. He is in
business now with Samuel T. Chase of
the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance
company of Chicago. He is a very
FOR BUSINESS OR
OR DRESS WEAR
our -fabrics are ready for your
selection for your fall suit. Our
styles are ready for your choice
also, and you can have your early
fall suit under way and ready
when you want it if you come in
now and be measured at
E. F. DORN,
1812 Second Ave.
I
CAMPBELL'S
S.L AND
Pleasant, unassuming youth, and bears
his titles, namely: four times western
champion and twice national cham
pion, with good grace. He is expected
to be the winner of this tournament.
If he does win it will break a hoodoo
lor he said yesterday that he ha 1
never yet won a tournaiiHnt lollow-
ing the winning of a championship, lie
said that he was not plaving up to
form here because of the lei down af
ter last week's plav when he won t!ie
western championship at Chicago. T!i ;
si rain is so great that for some time
alter he is unable to play up to form.
That golf involves great mental ami
neivous strain is admitted bv all.
r.ruco Mint n. who was ueieateu ner-;j
in the first round by I),
played baseball on the
Edwards, h is I
Yale 'varsilv .
team and he says the strain in
a has j-
ball games does not compare
on the golf field.
to tin:
SOCIAL AFFAIRS.
I Society news, written or telephone.!
to the society editor of The Argus, will
he wholly received am published. Hut
in ente r ease tin? identity of the seinier
mm t be miole known, to insure relia
bility. Written notices must bear Bin
iiature and address.
Arsenal Golf Club Dance. The
fourth of the series of dancing parties
of the Hock Island Arsenal Golf chit)
will be held this evening at the clu i
house.
X. Y. Z. Dancing Party. Invitation
have been issued to a dancing party to
be given by the X. Y. '-. club at the
Watch Tower inn Tuesday evening.
Aug. J 7.
Men to Give Sociable. The men cf
Sacred Heart church will give a hiwu
sociable at the church next Tuesday
evening. The men have charge of a'.!
Ihe arrangements anil will also serv
Birthday Party. Miss Amy nut-
ley yesterday afternoon from 4 to
entertained at a party in honor of he-
ll'tli birthday anniversary at her horn
llin .Nineteenth street. Dinner was
served and the afternoon passed with
games and music. Miss Amy receive
a number of handsome gifts.
Gives Haviland Shower. Miss Lena
Holtorf of ftl'l Twenty-second street is
giving a navnauti china shower t!ii.-
afternoon as a courtesy for Miss Theo.
Coyne who is to be a bride of nexL
month. The afternoon is being spent
playing games in which hearts pre
dominate. Dinner will be served at 5
o'clock.
Informal Dancing Party. Mr. an 1
Mrs. G. Watson French of Daveiipor
last evening entertained for their soi.
(i. Decker French at at an infoiniai
dancing party at the ltock Island A
senal Golf club house. About J. cou
ples were in attendance many of th-j
visiting golfers being guests. The clu'o
house was decorated prettily with Jap
anese lanterns and umbrellas.
Bay-Fisher. Mrs. Mary Fisher of
ltock Island and Frank Pay of Carli-.vi
Cliff were married Wednesday evening
at Sacred Heart church by Rev. J. F.
Lockuey. They were attended by Mr?.
D. II. Ryan of Chicago and Theodora
Free. Following the ceremony a wed
ding supper was served at the home cf
the brides' daughter Mrs. P. Harth,
251 Fifth avenue. They then left for
their home in Carbon Cliff where Mr.
Pay conducts a meat market.
Shunning - Cox. The marriage of
Miss Nellie E. Cox of Sears to John
Shunning took place Thursday evening
at the home of the bride's sister Mte.
Ixonard Huss in Sears. The ceremony
was performed by Rev. .1. B. Rutte
of Peoria, formerly pastor of Spencer
Memorial Methodist church, and wa1:
witnessed by a company of about 100
c. I.
CHANGE HOUR OF LEAVING
Elks Leave for Outing at 9:30 in the
Morning.
At the meeting of the Elks Jast eve
ning, artangenients were made for th-3
steamer Pearson, which has been chat
tered to take the Elks to Peterson'
island tomorrow, to leave at D:o') in
stead of S:'M as was at lirst planned.
This change was made because many
of the local "Rills" like that late sleep
too well. The boat will depart from
the east Seventeenth street landing.
The outing' will be a stag picnic fo.
Elks only. Rig doings have beea
planned, and a train load or so of pro-
visions lias been secured by the coni-
nilttee.
guests. A wedding dinner and recep
tion followed the ceremony. Mr. aut
Mrs. Shunning will make their liomn
in Milan where a home has been pro-
pared. Mr. shunning is employed Dy
the Tri-City Railway company.
Milan Young Lady Married in Clin
ton. Miss Dessie O'Neal of Milan and
Cecil Leroy Jackson of Oregon. Hi.
have just announced their marriage
which took place in Clinton, Iowa.
Aug. 7 at the parsonage of the Firit
Methodist church. Rev. T. M. Evans offic
iating. Mr. Jackson is employed in
the Schiller Piano factory at Orego-i
having been formerly employed with
the Artista Piano Player company until
last winter when he removed to Or-i
gon. His bride has assisted iter uncrj
H. E. Little in the Milan postoffico.
They will make their home in Oregon.
Celebrate Silver Wedding. Mr. an 1
Mrs. Fred Holdorf of 412 Fourth ave
nue last evening celebrated the silver
or .tii anniversary ol tneir marriage.
at Turner hall. A company of aboui
l.lo couples was present. A number
of toasts were responded to. Mayor
Olson of Moline acting as toastmaste".
An elaborate dinner was served and au
orchestra furnished music during the
evening for dancing, which continued
till a late hour. An unusually largo
number of handsome silver presents
were received by Mr. and Mrs. Holdor'.
From out of town the following guesta
were present: Mrs. Pendergrass ami
daughter of Hockford. Miss Einilie ami
Margaret Holdorf of La Grange. 111.
Mr. and Mrs. George Norton of Chi
cago, Mr. and Mrs. All of St. Loui;.
Mis. Gibbon of Denver. Mr. and Mr.
Iiouniue of New York city and a large
number from DavcniKirt.
A SAN FRANCISCO PHYSICIAN.
Uses Herpicide Successfully in Treat
ing Sycosis of the Beard.
He says: "I recently treated a case
of "sycosis (similar to 'barber's itch')
of the lower lip with Newbros Herpi
cide. Tiiere was an extensive los of
beard with inflammation extending
well down on the chin. The result of
the application of Herpicide was most
gratifying. The loss of beard ceased
and a new growth of hair is now tak
ing place over the once inflamed area.
"(Signed.) Melville K. O'Neill. M. D.
"843 Howard St.,
"San Francisco. Cal."
Herpicide kills the dandruff germ
and permits the hair to grow abun
dantly. Sold by leading druggists. Send 10c
in stamps for sample to the Herp'.
cide company, Detroit, Mich. Sold hi
two sizes. 5c and $1. T. II. Thomas,
special agent.
"Regular as the Sun
is an expression as old as the race.
No doubt the rising and setting of the
sun is the most regular performance
in the universe, unless it is the action
of the liver and howels when regulat.!
with Dr. King's New Life Pills. Guar
anteed by W. T. Ilartz, druggist, 301
Twentieth street. 25c.
DeWitt's Carbolized Witch Hazel
Salve penetrates the pores and heals
quickly. Sold by all druggists.
I chaiice..In. the ypather.tjuring the aft

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