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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, December 09, 1911, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92053934/1911-12-09/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE ROCK ISLAND ARGUS. SATURDAY, DECEJtlBER 9, 1911.
t. Citizens From all the Walks of Life in Rock Island Breathe True
Christmas Spirit in Letters to The Argus
pg Why I B
DB. E. 7. BARTHOLOMEW.
'
V
.1 .-'. .JSm
H. M. SCHBIVEB.
H. E. CASTEEL .
HON. L. S. M'CAEE.
BreathM ttier m&a wltb soul to
dead, who never to himself hath aald
at some time In Urn lite, "I do belWTe
In Santa Clans."
If there be doubt tn the mind of any
boy or tfrl in Rock Island who has
been atrlTlnc to do his best or her
best In order to win the faror, either
in farcer or smaller quantity, of the
mysterious little elf. let his or her
doubts be forever dispelled.
People of various avocations In Rock
Island, grown people, too, have written
The Argus letters expressing their
faith both In Santa Clans and the
spirit that makes his visitations such
a gladsome occasion for childbood.
Bo that any boy or girl In Rock Is
land who fears that Santa Claus will
fall to visit every deserving child In
this city may pat anxiety on that score
Mlde. Santa Claus win be on the Job
as usual.
A POFCXAR MOVEMENT.
For three years The Argus has con
ducted, with most gratifying results, a
Santa Claus movement for poor chil
dren, sccompsnied by what is known
as the Good Fellowship opportunity for
all -who may desire to play Santa Claus
themselves. The conditions of this
enterprise are familiar to most people,
and in order to bring the Santa Claus
sentiment in an that ft means to child
hood, home to those good-heerted peo
ple who have aided The Argus Santa
Claus movement In tie past and are
aiding It this season, as well as to
show to the little people that their
elders have the same affectionate fer
vor for the little fat man that they
have. The Argus recently addressed a
brief note to a number of people, tak
en Indiscriminately from the various
walk of Ufa in Rock Island, to this
effect:
THE IWVlTATIOjr.
"The Argus will be pleased to have
you write for It a story of about 100
words on Why I Believe In Santa
Claus,' to be published with similar
communications as a feature of The
Argus Annual Santa Claus Fund for
Poor Children."
With rare exception the note was
promptly answered. Fully 80 per cent
of the people addressed responded,
Just as the mood happened to take
them at the time. Some wrote that
they were preparing replies to send in
later, others 'phoned that they would
be glad to write If they had the time,
while today's mail brought several
answers, too late tor use in this con
nection. THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT.
What la most significant in all the
letters that appear In this connection.
Is the manner in which all catch the
spirit of Christmas. All that pertains
to it In myth or legend or tradition
seems to arouse a feeling belonging
peculiarly to this time of year. It Is a
feeling of affection and of universal
good will and good cheer. But, read
for yourself, why the older people of
Rock Island believe In Santa Claus, as
Indicated by the letters that have been
sent to The Argus:
A REAL SA!fTA CLAUS STORY.
"Auntie, do you believe in Santa
Claus?" "Why, yea, dear, to be sure I
do. Let me tell you a story and then
yon will know why I believe In him.
Last year, Just before Christmas, some
good-hearted men, fearing that the
task of looking up all the children was
too much for Santa Claus who Is grow
ing old yon know, decided to help him
out They started a Santa Claus fund
and everybody who wUhed could take
a part in this good work. The people
responded so well to their appeals,
that a generous sum was soon realized,
and this was placed in the hands of a
committee who immediately got In
touch with Santa, and on Christmas
eve many homes were visited and
scores of children were made happy.
I haven't the time to tell you of all
the places that were visited, but
will tell yon of one family where San
ta Claus' visit waa especially appre
ciated.
Little Dorothy, alx years of age, was
the oldest of m family of four chil
dren, who had lately moved Into the
DS. O. L .EYBTEB.
TJtrgUria, .QHpr is a Sattta (Elaita Start a (Steal
Qatar tn a iGittk (StrL
Once a little girl wrote this letter to Charles A .Dana, the great editor of the New
York Sun:
Dear Editor: I am eight yean old. Some of my friends say that there is no
Santa Clans. Papa says: 'If you see it in The Son, it's so." Please tell me the
truth. Is there a Santa Clans? VIRGINIA O. HANLON.
And the editor of The Sun, mighty man of invective and sarcasm, became "even
as a little child," and wrote the following charming reply, than which in all the realm of
childhood sentiment there is nothing sweeter:
Virginia: Your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skeptic
ism of a skeptical age. They will not believe except they see.
Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus.
He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, ana you know
that they abound and give to your life its highest beauties and joy.
Alas, how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as
dreary as if there were no Virginias. There would be no c'lildlike faith, no poetry, no
romance to make tolerabl" this existence. We should have no enjoyment except in
sense and sight. The eternal light with which childhood fills the world would be ex
tinguished. You might get your pap v to hire' men to watch all th chimneys on Christmas eve
to catch Santa Claus, but een if they did not see Santa Claus coming down, what
would that prove? Nobody sees Santa Claus. The most real things in the world are
those that neither children or men see. Nobody n see or- imagine all the wonders
that are. unseen and unseen i le in this world.
You may tear apart tha baby's rattle and see what nakes the noise inside, but
there is a veil covering: th unseen world which not the strongest that ever lived can
ever tear apart. Only faith, fancy, poetry, love and romance can push aside that cur
tain and view the picture, supernal beauty and glory beyond.
Is it all real?. Ah, Virginia, in all this world there is nothing so real and abiding.
No Santa Claus? Thank God, he lives and lives forever. A thousand years from
now, Virginia nay ten times ten thousand years from now he will continue to make
glad the hearts of childhood.
MISS DINA RAMSER.
ft . i
. VUi"" - , tV:4,S
g if't ill 1
city. Misfortune bad followed them to
their new home, which was a very
poor one indeed, Just two small rooms
la a basement and one after the oth
er, the members of this family were
taken sick, the father first, then Dor
othy and then the baby, too, became
ill, and it was a sad and discouraged
family Indeed, who were looking for-
ward to the coming of Christmas day,
with not even enough food in the
house. Dorothy' mother, usually so
hopeful and cheerful had Just said,
"Santa Claus will never be able to
find us this year," when suddenly
noise waa heard as though some one
was falling down the dark narrow
JUDGE G. J. SZARLZ.
steps leading Into the basement, the
door flew open, and there, stood Santa
Claus, carrying a large basket, the
other arm full of bundles, and accom
panied by a beautiful young lady, who
also had her arms full of bundles. The
children recovering from their great
surprise, looked on in amazement, as
all sorts of presents, toys of every de
scription, books, warm mittens, stock
ings and caps, as well as bags contain
ing all sorts of good things, oranges,
apples, candy, nuts, and cakes, were
distributed, until every one was well
supplied, and Oh! wonder of won
ders! Dorothy found herself hugging
a large beautiful doll! Santa and his
companion disappeared aa suddenly as
they had appeared and after they were
gone a large basket was opened,
which contained everything Imaginable
necessary for a good Christmas dinner.
The next day a lady who dropped
In to see the family, was greeted by
happy faced children, eager to show
their presents and Dorothy with shin
lng eyes cried, "Oh! Santa Claus
earned to see va last night, and he
brlnged toe this dollie." "And Mrs,
Santa Claus corned too, and she glv
ed me this." cried little Carl, Joyfully
banging away on his drum.
The mother, with teara In her eyes.
tried to tell of what Santa's visit meant
to them, of the good dinner they en-
Joyed, which was the first for a long,
long time, and there in the damp,
dark basement came Joy and happi
ness, because Santa Claus had found
them. DINA RAMSER.
WHERE SANTA TAUGHT A LESSON
The query indicates that some one
has doubt as to the existence of Santa
Claus and for the benefit of that per
son, I will tell how I discovered that
there really is a Santa Claus. While
quite young, I conceived the idea that
some one was fooling me and I openly
evpressed my disbelief in Santa Claus,
I was sure that it was someone about
H. A. J. M'DONALD.
MISS MARGARET GILES.
i - ' 5
J
the house who had been filling my
stocking for years with good things
and when I arose that Christmas morn
ing, I was confident that my stocking
would be filled aa usual.
It was, hut the filling was ashes and
then I knew that Santa Claus bad
punished me. luce then I have been
faithful to him and he generally re
members me,
O. 1 BRUNER.
I BELIEVE IN SANTA CLAUS.
Aye, Aye; Oul, Out; And once again
YOU BET I DO.
"Breathes there a man with soul so
dead, who never to himself has said"
- ; P. O. YOUNG.
"Twas the night before Christmas,
And all through the house
Not a creature was stirring.
Not even a mouse"
And again
"He had a red nose
And a little round belly
That shook when he laughed
Like a bowlful of Jelly."
If these words portray not the truth,
then indeed am I deceived.
HUGH E. CURTIS.
REAL HAPPINESS.
Any move or any ideal that looks to
the making of children happy at
Christmas time Is a worthy one. True
happiness is In making others happy
and there is no happiness so real as in
seeing the innocent happiness of chil
dren- H. H. HULL.
EMBODIMENT OF CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
I toelieve In the embodiment of the
Christmas spirit of good cheer, kind
ness, and thoughtfulness for others,
as personified in the jolly old Santa
Claus.
It Is difficult for a child to grasp an
idea In the abstract, therefore let his
little world be peopled with "Santa
Claus" "Jack Frost," "the Sandman"
and others fronr. the realm of fancy.
As he grows older, instead of losing
the idea of Santa ClauB.' let him em
body the spirit of the dear old man,
and make It a part of himself to
manifest In deeds later in life.
Long live Santa Claus, and all he
represents!
MARGARET A. GILES.
THE GENEROUS IMPULSE.
The spirit of giving 1b composed of
two elements of human goodness;
First, the generous Impulse of a good
heart; and, secondly, the social In
stinct that recognizes that man cannot
if he would, and would not If he could.
live wholly unto himself. What makes
the day glad? What precludes the in
coming of the physical or mental pain
and worry? What makes the contem
plation of the present, and the mem
ory of the past, sweet?
It Is very largely a good heart in
one's self and In those round about;
in family, in neighborhood. In citizen
ship. Add to this a sociable nature, a
disposition to mingle with others, to
share, in common, Joys and sorrows;
in other words, to do team work, and
we have the spirit of giving 'fuir up
ana rounded over.
ROBERT W. OLMSTED,
PERPETUATES CHILD'S LIFE.
I believe in the Santa Claus legend,
because it serves to perpetuate in the
life of the child an interesting romance
which is harmless in Itself and is a
means of keeping alive the memories
and customs of the Christmas festival.
If it can be called a delusion, it is one
of those cherished delusions of life ot
which we never wish to be disillusion
ed. It appeals to the child-heart as
nothing else in the round of the year's
experiences ever does. It calls up as
sociations which are precious to every
child and which tend to keep alive the
gift idea and cultivate the feeling of
generosity.
It has a world of meaning to the
child which we cannot afford to neg
lect It helps all of us, at least once a
year, to be like children and to sympa
thize with the innocent pleasures and
enjoyments of childhood.
It strengthens the eweet bonds of
home life, it makes sacred the mem
ories and-customs of the nursery and
the fireside, it connects the silent, holy
night of yule-tide with things spiritual
and unseen In the wondering heart of
childhood. E. F. BARTHOLOMEW.
BECAUSE HE IS SO REAL.
Why do I believe in Santa Claus?
Because he Is bo real. The thought of
his coming brings such Joy to the chil
dren, and because of It the stockings
are hung up, and there is a season
when every child tries his best to be
good, that he may be In proper stand
ing with the dispenser of so many real
Christmas surprises.
Belief In Santa Clans enhances the
W. M. BECK.
DB. W. S. MAEQUIS.
? V. .
0. L. BRUNER.
JT V
1
W. S. M COMBS.
- It A
M. H. SEXTON.
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