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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, December 25, 1911, Image 2

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THE ROCK ISLAND ARGUS, MONDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1911.
O
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DAVENPORT
Ueenssd to Wed. John Heglin,
Anoka, Minn, and Katherlne Wendle,
Marengo; Wlllajd A. Smith. Barry,
I1L, and Nora L. Brush, Davenport;
Stewart Bull, Silvia, XIL. and Edna
Scheurmann, Davenport; John H.
Pruett, Davenport, and Lenora Fox,
Rawson, CX.
Branrtfgan Qoe to Jall Jamea
Branalgan, who waa apprehended
in Maw York, on the charge of forging
check amounting to over $500, and
who waa brought back to Davenport
by Sheriff Irnla Eckhardt and Con
aUble Phil Kahlea Friday, waa held
under $2,600 bond to the January
term of the grand Jury following ar
raignment before Justice Phil Daum
Saturday afternoon. Brannlgan waa
unable to furnlah the ball and waa
est to Jail awaiting trial. He plead
not guilty and waived preliminary ex
amination. Wants Heavy Damages, Two peti
tion for damagea aggregating $50,000
agalnat the Chamberlln. Kindt com
pany and Charles T. Kindt and K. P.
Adler were filed late Saturday after
noon In the district court by Attorney
Charles T. Cooper. In the first suit
filed agalnat Chamberlln, Kindt and
company the plaintiff alleges that on
Nov. 23. 1909, he purchased a ticket
for the Princess theatre. He claims
he was conducted to a aeat by an
usher and while conducting himself
with propriety and respect was forci
bly thrown out, brutal strength being
used. He claims bia hip waa Injured
which has caused a permanent injury.
For this he asks $25,000 Judgment In
the second ault agalnat Charles T.
Kindt and E. P. Adler he asserts that
because of a libelous, false and mill
clous statement caused to be publish
ed 1n which It waa asJd that he was
Intoxicated and hod Insulted women,
his reputation has been Injured to the
amount of $25,000. Ho states he la a
member of the Scott county bar and
baa enjoyed a large and lucrative prac
tice in the city of Davenport and sur
rounding states.
Obituary R coord. Charles Whlta
ker, for many years a well known
Davenport attorney and former mem
ber of the Scott County Bar associa
tion, died Saturday at his home In
Birmingham, Ala., where he has re
sided for a number of years. Funeral
services and burial will take place In
Birmingham.
Word waa received In Davenport
Saturday of the death at Springfield.
Ill, of Colonel J. 8. Lord, for a num
ber of years a resident of Davenport,
and who while residing here was
united in marriage to Miss Anna Gra
ham. In Davenport Colonel Lord was
engaged In the coal business.
Miss Mamie B. Swift died Saturday
after an Illness extending over a year
at the home of her sister, Mrs. N. L.
Cook, 411 West Fourteenth street.
She was born May 2C. 1882, in Glfford,
Iowa, and was educated at St Mary's
school In Marshalltown, Iowa. She
came to this city In 1904 and haa been
Identified with the department stores
and with the Davenport hotel cigar
store. Among the survivors is her
sister, Mrs. Joseph Farrell of Rock
Island. The funeral waa held yester-
home of her sister at 411 West Four
teenth street
of the water and until Wednesday in
Liverpool.
New York The principal features
of interest in the steel trade last week
were th placing of contracts for 130,
000 tons of rails, Increased activity In
structural steel for buildings and
bridges and the acquirement by the
Eastern Steel company of the War
wick Iron and Steel plant
Madrid The Spanish government
It is understood, has finally settled
upon the baaea for a provisional com
mercial convention with Cuba The
proposed treaty does not clash with
Cuba's commercial convention with
the United States, its best market
London Labor unrest in England
shows signs of becoming serious after
Christmas. The Dundee strike was
settled by small concessions to the
workers, but the threatened universal
coal strike shows no signs of being
prevented, and workmen at the
Thames shipbuilding yards threaten to
try to create a general strike in their
Industry.
Madrid An official dispatch from
Melllla, Morocco, reports an extended
engagement with tribesmen on Dec.
22. The Spaniards lost nine killed and
19 wounded.
WIRE SPARKS
Fort Dodge, Iowa The mills of the
Quaker Oats company were destroyed
by fire, entailing a loss of $200,000.
Ogden, Utah Henry Southworth
waa acquitted of the murder of E. L.
Hanks at an amusement park here
Aug. 32 last
Elmlra, N. T. Frank E. Fitsglb-
bons, dean of the operators on the As
sociated Press night New York state
wire, is dead. Nov. 10 he completed
25 years of continuous service with
the Advertiser.
New Orleans This is going to be
another holiday week In the cotton
market. Trading will stop Friday
night not to be resumed until the fol
lowing Tuesday. The market does
not open until Tuesday on this side
BEAUTY TRUTHS.
Plmplee, SaUowness, Blotches aad
; Dun Eyes Caused by Stomach
Beauty is only skla deep, but that's
deep enough to satisfy most women,
also men.
In order to keep the skin In a clear,
clean, healthy condition, the stomach
must supply the blood plenty of nutri
tion. As long aa the stomach Is out of
order and the blood lacks proper nour
ishment the skin will be affected.
If you want a perfect skin that you
will be proud of, take a week's treat
ment of MI-O-NA stomach tablets.
Get a fifty cent box today, and If you
are not satisfied after a week's treat
ment you caa have your money back.
For any stomach ailment MI-O-NA
la guaranteed. It gives almost In
stant relief and permanently cures.
Largs box 50 cents, at the Harper
House pharmacy and durggtsU every
'where.
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MOLINE
MRS. GEORGE W 1CK.KRSH AM,
wife of tba attorney general of
the United States, beloag to the old
Knickerbocker class of Albany, N.
Y and she is an exalted type of the
grande dame of the New World.
Her father, Cornelius Wendell, was
of th old school of politioa. an un
flinching Democrat In a time wbaa
blood ran hot and expediency urged
many to enroll undsr the banner
which stood oetart the world for Um
undivided Unittn. Be served bis par
ty faithfully and came to Washing
ton first to reorganize th govern
ment printing establishment under
President Job use a. With bis family
he remained for two years alter
Grant's Inauguration, and be and his
wits were prominent members of of
ficial society.
Mrs. Wickercham and her sister,
now th widow of Lieutenant Tay
lor. United titates Army, were inti
mates of Nellie Grant and her broth
era and they caught a glimpse of
th social life of the Whit House
under very pleasant otrcumstanoes.
By a pleasant coincidence the young
daughter of the attorney general.
Miss Constancs Wlckarsbara. will see
llf In Washington under similar
happy auspices 8b Is just six teen.
There 1 an elder daughter of th
attorney general who waa very popu
lar In New York society, as Miss
Gwendolyn Wtckorsbam. and wboi
WCKRSKArvfl
two years ago married Albert Aiken,
of New Yoric. now a sugar planter
of Cuba. Mra Aiken will spend part
of th winter in Washington with her
parents, making an additional attrac
tion to this interesting family. There
is on son, Cornelius Wendell Wick
ersham. who recently graduated from
Harvard.
Mra Wlckersham's mother, who re
sides with her daughter, Mra Taylor,
In Poushkeepsie, N. Y. pays frequent
visits to the Washinctoa home. Mra.
Wendell, who is now quite a
venerable woman, la a member of an
Albany Knickerbocker family, as fa
mous in the social and patriotic an
nals of the state as the Wendells.
Bh waa born Harriet Hinckly, and
th old Hinckley homestead on the
high hills of the Hudson below Al
bany is well known to travelers on
th day boat from New York.
Like all women of such Intellectual
bend, Mra Wickeraham is perfectly
conversant with all the public ques
tions of th day. Not even such com
plicated themes as Nw York politics,
the laws of the corporations and the
Industrial Issues are beyond her
grasp. Bhe la however, of the type
furnished by th- wive of many of
the most successful public men in
America and England. She does not
car to express her opinion about
public questiona H? sphere is the
home and she reigns ther as a queen
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Employes Remember Bosses Em
ployes of the machine shop of the
Velle Motor works presented Ross
Irving, the timekeeper, with a bean
tlful morris chair and watch fob. The
employes of the whole auto plant gave
Ed Schner, the new superintendent
a bean tlful Mason button.
Gift for A. L. Moore. Employes
of the Moline Wagon company pre
sented a handsome Christmas gift to
A. Hi -Moore, retiring general manager
of the plant The presentation was
made Saturday In the sample room,
Frank H. Oraeslng making an appro
priate speech. The gift took the form
of a sterling silver water pitcher and
a tray of massive design. Both pitcher
and tray are highly burnished and are
of the graceful Plymouth design.
Obituary Record. Glen S.. the In
fant son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry M.
Miller, residing at 846 First street
died Saturday morning. The child
was born In Moline April 26, 1910, and
I ia survived by his parents and a sister,'
Helen, aged 10. Funeral services
were held yesterday afternoon at 2:30
at the home, and burial took place at
Riverside cemetery.
Children Get Auto Ride. Children
at Bethany home were given a novel
Christmas present Saturday forenoon,
an automobile ride through the streets
of the three cities. The cars were
furnished by Fred Young, proprietor
of the Plow City garage. When the
cars passed through Moline the smil
ing faces of the occupants was indi
cation that they were enjoying Mr.
Young's hospitality.
To Seek League Franchise. A mass
meeting of every fan in Moline la
called for 7:45 Wednesday evening,
Dec. 27, in Moline club rooms, at
which time there will be a discussion
of . a campaign for raising funds to
support league baseball. The meet
ing may result In men being named to
appear before Three-Eye league mag
nates in Chicago at the January meet
ing to bid for t'ie Rock Island fran
chise, which has been surrendered to
President A. R. Tearney by (Stockhold
ers of the Rock Island association.
Laid to Rest The body of the late
Carl August Flood, who died following
the stabbjig incident of Wednesday
night, was burled yesterday at 2:30,
the funeral being from the home of
his sister, Mrs. Berna Swanson, 1307
Fifteenth street, with Interment at
Riverside. Mr. Flood was born in Up
land, Sweden, Jan. 7, 1879. He was
married there to Miss Emma Johnson,
the two coming to America in 1903
and first making their home in Ke
wanee. For four years they remained
In that city, moving here early in 1907.
Since his arrival in Moline, Flood had
been employed as . a grinder, for the
greater part of the time working at
the Moline Plow company. His widow
and four email children survive, the
youngest of the four but an infant of
a few months. His parents, four sis
ters and one brother are living In
Sweden. Mrs. Berna Swanson and
Mrs. Erick Erickson and two brothers,
John and Simond, residing here.
of these spasms. After dinner on the
day be was leaving, says Talleyrand
in bis memoirs, the emperor had called
him Into bis-room. There Talleyrand
found him gasping for breath. "1
tore off his cravat, for he seemed like
to choke. He did not vomit but sigh
ed and foamed. M. de Remusat first
gentleman in waiting; who had also
come into the room, handed him wa
ter, and I sprinkled him with eau de
cologne. He was suffering from some'
sort of cramp, which passed off In a
quarter of an hour. We laid him in
an armchair. He began to speak, put
his dress right commanded -us to ob
serve the strictest secrecy, and half
an hour later, he was on his way to
Carlsruhe.
Another sign of the abnormal In Na
poleon was his intense irritability, and
often there came a nervous breakdown
that reduced him to the condition of a
hysterical woman. This irritability
sometimes took the form of fits of
weeping. He would fly Into a passion
on the slightest provocation. In his
iinpatiancs he tore many a garment to
pieces because It lnconventeneed him
In some trifling way. H had aa inner
melancholy that never left htm. While
he talked of death, Napoleon never
had any serious intention of taking his
own Ufa Ha never lost his grasp of
Ufa While a man. of dreams, he was
a man of action. Success did not make
this dreamer more cheerful. He had
strange moments of bitterness and
hatred and a desire to inflict pain. For
Instance, he would say to a lady after
asking her name, "Dear me, I was told
you were pretty V or to an elderly gen
tleman, "You have not much longer to
live."
It was comparatively early tn his
career that his insane desire to rule
not France, not even Europe, but sQ
the world, took possession of him. The
real reason for his crushing downfall
Is to be found in this megalomania
He himself caused his downfall. Na
poleon alone could have conquered Na
poleon, and It was this megalomania
that undid him.
There was his dream of the control
of Europe. "There will," he said to his
intimates while he was still first con
sul, "be no peace In Europe till it is
under the command of a single leader,
under one emperor, with kings for his
officers, who will distribute kingdoms
to bis generals, making one king of
Bavaria, one landman of Switzerland,
another stadtholder of Holland and
giving them all official posts in the im
perial household, such as grand cup
bearer, grand chamberlain, grand mas
ter of the hounds, etc."
Napoleon did place kings In several
countries and. controlled the policy of
nearly every country of Europe a
wonderful achievement for the pov
erty stricken charity boy who got his
education at Erienne at the expense
of his sovereign. He might have re
mained the king of kings in Europe
had he been satisfied with that awful
height But he was not satisfied; be
never was saosnea. After Europe
there was Asia.
On the day he was crowned emperor
In December, 1804, he said to his min
ister of marine: ."I grant you my
career has been brilliant and I have
risen high. But what a difference
from ancient times! Look at Alexander
the Great! After he had conquered
Asia he declared himself the son of
Jupiter, and, except his mother Olym-
pias, Aristotle and a few Athenian
pedants, the east believed him. Nowa
days If I were to declare myself the
son of the Everlasting Father there
isn't a fishwife but would hiss me!
The nations are much too enlightened
now, and nothing great is left to do.'
"And France,' says Mr. O'Connor, in
conclusion, "sacrificed a million lives
to the monomania of a megalomaniac.
What tragedy in history is so gigantic,
so appalling, so pitiful, in a sense
ironic? '
(From Th Arg-us Files of lilt.)
Deo. 18. The hock Island branch of
the Irish National league will open the
winter meetings at Turner hall tomor
row evening, and a cordial invitation
Is extended to all to be present
The Methodist Episcopal church to
day received 200 new "Epworth song
books, which will hereafter be used by
the congregation.
The sheriff's allowances as fixed by
the board of supervisors ar $1,000 tor
transportation and livery hire and 60
cents a day for each prisoner's board.
The board of supervisors adjoumed
this morning until the first Monday in
March. Th bond of Mr. Dow, the new
steward of the poor farm, was ap
proved. Dec 20. There was a good attend
ance at th Sock Island rink Saturday
night to witness the five-mile raca be
tween Lee Gamble and WU1 Watt of
Moline. Watt woo. after an exciting
contest tn 19:11 Messrs. Collins and
Iee received much praise on their man
ner of conducting th rtnk.
Deo. II. A team attached to Peter
Fries delrvary wagon created s furore
near the corner of Eighteenth, street
and Sixth avenue by taking an axeit.
tb run around th block. The driver,
Detieff BramsMr. waa thrown off th
seat a wheal was Jerked off th wagon,
a lamp post suffared, but no serious
damage waa done to personal property.
Many supposed the outcome would bs
mare serious than It was,
A grand Uva pigeon shoot U to taks
place dear the city Jan. 28, 29 and 30.
The entry is opn to all at $7. Bud
Slice and other crack shots are expect
ed to be present
Superintendent Gamble is experi
menting with a new heating arrange
ment on the Moline St Rock Island
Horse railway. A small anthracite
burning furnace la placed on the plat
form of the car, with a cold air cham
ber below, by means of which the hot
air is driven into the car through a hot
sir chamber. The contrivance ia be
ing tried on No. 9 and appears to give
more satisfaction than the stoves in
side. If It proves a success it will be
introduced on all the 10 cars of the
MoUneRock Island line.
Dee. Xt. A straight stack cinder
burning locomotive came tn on the C,
B. Q. last night
Dec S3. Rock Island possesses sev
eral owners of fast blood trotting
stock. One day this week two well
known gentlemen, each of whom owns
a filer, got luto a discussion as to the
merits of their respective steeds, and
the outcome waa a decision to let the
horses themselves settle the martw. It
was agreed that the test should take
rlaee oa Moline svenue. Another gen
Oam a, a friend of the contestants, was
caoaea to act as referee. Quit a
crowd want up to witness th sport
bat one heat settled the race, and left
it unsettled. Eecfc maa thought his
horse waa the beet and the affair end
ed In acme thing akin to row. The
a disappointed crowd, and no race.
The driving park would do away with
all such grievances. Let's have it
Dec. 24. Lock Expert Flebig will go
to Cambridge tomorrow morning to
open the safe In County Treasurer
Nealy's office, the combination of which
refuses to work. Thus will Flebig do
good and pay for bis Christmas turkey
at the same time.
W. B. Mcjntyre will eat his Christ
mas dinner in Wilton.
Plans are stfll being considered for
the new C, R. L t F. shops in the city.
A number of donations of land have
been offered.
NAPOLEON'S FALL
The Modern A Mils Crashed by His
Streak of Insanity.
Were readers of history asked today
what three human characters have
been most prominent in making' the
history of the world there could prob
ably be great diversity of opinion as
to two of such personages, but ss to
the third the general agreement could
probably point to Napoleon Bonaparte.
T. P. O'Connor, who for many years
has made a study of the modern At
tUa, ss he was called by his contem
poraries, presents In his London msga
dne an article entitled The Insanity
of Napoleons Genfus," in which he
shows him to be a victim of megalo
mania, that form of mental alienation
In which the patient is possessed of
gradlose hallucinations.
Mr. O'Connor discards the idea that
Napoleon because of his gigantic pow:
er for; work bad a perfect physique
and Invulnerable health. He suffered
ss a child from extreme nervousness,
later from facial neuralgia. He had a
nervous twitching st the month and
the right shoulder. After Toulon he
long suffered from a painful and wast
ing cutaneous disease, snd st times he
had fits of sb epileptic character. As
be was about to leave Strassbnrg in
rrtlTKexfMxhtcMitkfKi CTr General Mack at Utm he had one
ABOUT A MILE. ;
It Makes a Difference In Which Land
On Travels This Distance,
If yon take a notion to settle down
for a time and sfter yon have been
whisked out and back In a motorcar
you think to ask how far the bouse is
from the station the agent carelessly
waves his hand snd airily remarks,
"About s mile, you had best take heed
as to what country you are in st the
time.
If it Is In England you are all right.
for the familiar 1,700 yards .is the
standard, but If you have taken
fancy to some sod thatched Irish
cottage it means a tramp of 2,240
yards, and if you are moved to linger
in the highlands remember that the
braw Scot calls L970 yards a mile
Considering the size of Switzerland,
one might expect a mile to be about
as far as one could throw a ball, but
the hardy mountaineers think 0,103
yards the proper thing, even when, as
it generally is. It is very much uphill
The Swiss is the longest mOe of all,
being followed by the Vienna poet
mile of 8296 yards.
The Flemish mile Is 6,809 yards, the
Prussian &237 yards, and in Denmark
they walk 8,244 yards and can It
stroll of s mile. The Arabs generally
ride good horses and call 2443 yards a
mile, while the Turks are satisfied
with 1328 yards, and the Italians
shorten the distance of a mile to L760
yards, just six yards more than the
American has in mind when the agent
waves his hand and blandly remarks,
-About a mile." Chicago Record Her
ald. -
ICEBERG GROUPINGS.
Clusters and Long Lin Formed by
Storms and Ocean Currants.
Among the perils and wonders of the
ocean there are few more interesting
things than. icebergs,, interesting not
only by reason of their gigantic ae.
their fantastic shapes, their exceeding
beauty, but also for the manner where
in they array themselves.
Icebergs exhibit s tendency to form
both clusters and long lines, and these
groupings may arise from the effects
both of ocean currents and of storms.
Some very singular lines of .berss,
Delicious
Doughnuts
perfectly raised. They
will be wholesome and
delicious and will not
"soak fat" if you use
Rumford. For produdnst
food of most delicate flavor
and perfect lishtness and
wholesomeness there is no baking powder to equaL
'l?-(ffl:iiTiiillbii
THE WHOLESOME
BAKING POWDER
The Best of the HIgh-Grade Baking Powders No Aram
4 ON
SAVINGS
1
Your Banking Business
During the New Year
In transactng your banking business during the New
Tear you will find the facilities of the Rock Island Savings
bank always at your disposal.
Whether you contemplate opening a checking or a Sav
ings account, this institution, the oldest and largest sav
ings bank in the city, can serve you in the most acceptable
manner.
We Invite you to avail yourself - of the service we caa
t render you in your financial affairs during 1912.
lastftpMlilisilPHisr. ililHn ..sXiiiibal sT. .VtasVefcBlifaaiaslrVlli f sW snsMSMmssssk arf-s
TRANSACTS A GENERAL COMMERCIAL, SAVINGS,
EXCHANGE AND SAFETY DEPOSIT BUSINESS
extending for many hundreds of miles
east of Newfoundland, have been
shown on official charts issued by the
government. Two of these cross each
other, each keeping on its Independent
course after the crossing. In several
Instances parallel lines of bergs leave
long spaces of clear water between
them.
Curiously enough, while enormous
fields of ice Invade the so called
"steamship lanes" of the Atlantic at the
opening of spring during certain years,
in other years at that season there is
comparatively little ice to be .seen.
The ice comes, of course, from the
edfes of the arctic regions, from the
icebound coasts of Greenland and
Labrador, where huge bergs, broken
from the front of the glaciers at the
point where they reach the sea, start
on their long Journeys toward the
south, driven by the great current
that flows from Baffin bay into the
northern Atlantic ocean. Harper's
Weekly.
All the news all the time. The
Argus.
ViEE8pF FLOUR
Pin'es't in the World
LAG0MARCIN0-GRUPE CO., Tri-City Distributors.
Sold by All Grocers.
Are You Going to Heat Your House With
STEAM or HOT WATER?
f yon are thinking of doing so. it will pay yon to get
our estimate before letting yonr contract. We are xnak.
ing some
Special Low Prices
for the next 30 days that will save you money and at the
same time gives us an opportunity to do the work before,
the fall rush is on. -
W also repair and put in order all kinds of furnaces, steam and
hot water boilers and right now is the proper time for you to have
this dene. ' -
Alien, Mvers & Company
OPPOSITE HARPER HOUSE.

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