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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, October 17, 1912, HOME EDITION, Image 1

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THE ROCK ISLAND ARGUS.
Associated Press
Exclusive Wire
SIXTY-FIRST YEAR. NO. 313.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1912. TWELVE PAGES,
PRICE TWO CENTS.
GOVERNOR
ALL AT 8
HOME EDITION
THOMAS
R.
O'CLOCK
GHT
COLONELHAS
TO BE QUIET
A WEEK MORE
Physicians Halt Roosevelt
in His Campaign Tour
Planning.
IS ANXIOUS TO RESUME
Best Medicine at This Time Is
Rest, Say Doctors
Attending
CHICAGO, OCT. 17. THE THIRD
DAY OF ROOSEVELT'8 STAY AT
MERCY HOSPITAL PASSED LIKE
A QUIET DAY AT HOME IN THE
MIDST OF HIS FAMILY. IT WILL
REQUIRE ANOTHER DAY WAITING
FOR SYMPTOMS OF 6EPSIS BE
FORE PHYSICIANS, IF THERE IS NO
CHANGE FOR THE WORSE, WILL
BE ABLE TO SAY "ALL IS WELL."
AT NOON MRS. ROOSEVELT DE
CREED NO VISITORS WERE TO
SEE COLONEL ROOSEVELT DUR
ING THE DAY, BECAUSE HE HAD
NOT SLEPT DURING THE MORN
ING. ROOSEVELT COMPLAINED
6MILINGLY. BUT SHE DID NOT
GIVE HIM OPPORTUNITY TO SAY
ANYTHING ABOUT IT.
"This fight for the rule of the people
in all a sham." he said, with a laugh.
"Here I aui. a victim of machine rulo
uelf.'' But tin re was no appeal from
the verdict of Mrs. Roosevelt. It is
not unlikely the colonel will be kept
in lli'' hospital another week. Although
n'ruidy straining at the leash, the puy
ti KiiiH are depending upon the iutiu-
in e of .Mrs. Roosevelt to keep him iu
I'll until danger of a setback bus
1 UBM'd.
nation dictated from the colonel's bed
Chicago. Oct. 17.--Colonel Koose-iin Mercy hospital at Chicago.
elt ji WlinK bo much better ttiat: Colonel Roosev? it told Mr. Lever
on awakening today he tw-Kan plHnning , Idge, "It matt(.T little about my injury,
f'i a continuation of bis campaign ,
trip. Most of the nlht the colonel :
ppent tn restful sleep. His condition
v.as prartiilly normal.
lien be awoke at 4 this morning
Roonevelt rttx'lared he "had a bully
s'eep," but he would not read because
he wtrthnd to doie until tiiti for his
pponge bath. M said be intended to
be fully awake at 7 so he could have
breaKfiist of which he was already be- j
g'tmlng to fill the need
KMT HKfcT MKII lK.
He ordered bacon, three soft boiled
eggs, toast and a pot of tea. He said
SriRANK NOT SORRY;
TRIAL IN NOVEMBER
John Shrank.
.Ii in :-t.-:u
d to iii, TV:
lari s ti a' hi
the r-.an who attempt-
- - - V r
Mte Koosveii. etui oe-1 now in a military prison at the capi
U sorry his attempt was ; ta ag th result of failure of the re-
ic: fi:c r:l. Ho will be triei in
'ovei:.bT. titer the election. If Koose-
li ;ies. tne maximum sentence that
ur l.e i. : i",irai:k w ilj be 13 years
ji tii" pi-n-.tentiary
as taken
The acomi allying picture
if Sural. k jail al MiUaiikte.
The Weather
Forecast Till 7 p. m. Tomorrow for
Rock Island, Davenport, Mollne,
and Vicinity.
Fair tonight and probably Friday,
continued mild temperature.
Temperature at 7 a. m., 50. High-;
eat yesterday. 61. lowest last night, 51.
Velocity of wind at 7 a. m 4 mile !
per hour.
Precipitation, none.
Relative humidity at 7 p. m., 64, at;
7 a. m., 71. !
Stage of water. 4 feet, a fall of .2
In last 24 hours.
J. M. SHERIER. Local Forecaster.
ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS.
(From ooon today to noon tomorrow.)
Sun sets 5:16. rises 6:15. Evening
stars: Mercury. Venus. Mars. Jupiter.
Voralng star: Saturn.
be was sure this would not be enough
for a man who was "almost well." The
many hours Roosevelt had been able
to rest was declared by his physicians
to be the best medicine for him. All
tne coionei s condition to De improved
from the last official bulletin issued at j
10 last night At 6 this morning his 1
temperature was 98.4; pulse. 74; res-',
plratlon, 18.
IVOX VD LOOKK W F.I.I. .
The official bulletin issued at 9:05 ,
this morning stated: "Wound dressed;
looks well; some oozing. Lungs in
good condition. General condition
pplendld. Case progressing so favor
ably unless some complications occur,
tullet will not be removed at present."
MCST REMAIN TILL. SVXDAY.
It was positively announced Roose
velt would not leave the hospital at
least till after Sunday. Dr. Lambert,
his family physician, explained there
was no significance to the fact that
j a bulletin said the bullet would not
be removed "at present"
"It depends upon two things," Dr. 1
Lambert said, "if it will ever be re-1
moved. One is, if it starts causing
trouble. The other Is, if Roosevelt
would rather carry his souvenir in his
pocket than In his chest."
reassihuxg iii i.i.mx.
; The most reassuring bulletin yet is- '
nied by the physicians concerning
j Roosevelt's condition was given out at i
1 o'clock. "PulBe. temperature and res- !
I ilnitm nrniiil yiiail I ttiiiMirii
to normal. Breathing easier." ;
SEVER WAXTEI1 PLACE.
Louisville, Ky., Oct. 17. Albert J. ;
Beveridge, former senator from Indi
ana, brought to Kentucky last night
i Colonel Roosevelt's message to the
but
it matters all about the
we fi:ht for. If one soldier
cause
who happens to carry the flag is
stricken another will take it from hi3
hand and carry it on.
"You know that personally I did
not want ever to be a candidate for
office again," the message from th-e
ex-priident. continues, "and you know
that only the call that came to the
men of the sixties ma.de me answer
i' in our day as they did more nobly
in their day."
Colonel Roosevelt was scheduled to
speak here last night.
ORDER TO CRUSH
DIAZ REBELLION
Mexico City, Oct 17. In order
crush the rebellion of Felix Diaz
to
at
Vera Cruz, the federal armies from
north and south and the forces of
General Beltran, stationed at F.sperau
za, have bten ordered to Vera Cruz.
Vera Crux is completely isolated ex
cept by watr. It la rumored Orozco
and Dial have reachei an understand
ing to unite all rebels against Presi
dent Madero. The government recog
nizes the importance of the rapture of :
the seaport, which permits the rebels
to bring in war supplies. It is hinted
funds are coming to Felix Diac from
some who were high in Porflro Diax's
administration.
President Madero's administration
appears to have reached a critical
point The resignation of the cabinet
was demanded in the chamber of dep
uties last night by Deputy Moheno but
the president of the chamber refused I
t J permit a discussion and the motion .
w ill come up again toflay. With Gen-
eral Felix Dial in undisputed control
of Vera Crux, Mexico most import
ant seaport, reports reached here of
new uprisings in various parts of the
republic. Including the city of Pachuca,
f5 miles from the capital
Diaz has been proclaimed provisional
president by his cousins. Colonel Jose
Dlax Ordax, commander of the 21st in
fantry, stationed at Vera Crux. Diaz
and his supporters are said to have al
ready selected a provisional cabinet
including General Bernardo Reyes,
tellion a year ago.
Springfield. 111. A man who suffers
from pulmonary dUease cannot be
compelled to work out his poll tax on
the streets or other highwavs. the ap-
apellate court ruled.
WOMAN BACKS UP
STORY OF ROSE
Mrs. Lillian Rosenberg, Wife cf
Lefty Louie, Testifies in
Becker Trial.
MURDER
IS ADMITTED?
One Witness Alleges
Makes Statement
Tombs.
Lieutenant
n the
Nerw York, Oct 17. Mrs. Lillian
Rosenberg, wife of "Lefty Louie," one
of the four gun men charged with
shooting Gambler Rosenthal, was one
of the several witnesses at the Beck
er trial today who corroborated por
tions of "Bald Jack" Rose's Btory.
"When this sensation blows over
the public will give me a pension for
killing that
crook, Rosen
thal.
TneBe the words attrlbuted t0
Pollce Lieutenant Charles Becker by
jame8 D. Hallen, a fellow prisoner
jn lne Tombs.
I Hallen was one of 15 witnesses who
! testified for the state. Assistant Dis-
trlct Attorney Moss announced that he
had on,y one or two more wltneMe,
t0 caI1 to comp!ete the case for Aa
nnnle
MKV ROSEXTI1AI. IS HEARD.
Mrs. Rosenthal, widow of the slain
gambler, testified that Becker, her l
husband's alleged partner in a gam
Mine hnilEA hart enid tn he. oftar a
raid he had rte th thiih. i
ment: "It's either Herman or me."
This was the so-called "rake" raid
... t . : v. . i. .. . i A .. . i
on Becker by his superior officers.
Mrs. Rosenthal testified also that i
when she buried her hushand she had !
only $100, all that had been left her by ; capital, as were his Servian and Bul
Rosentbal. jgarian colleages. The Turkish minis-
"We introduce this testimony," said ' er. however, left Athens without for
Mr. Moss. because it ha been claimed ! malities. The declaration of war of
by the defense that gamblers gave 1
Rosenthal $25,000 or some sum to in-!
sure his silence." j
saw hose give HK.f KKH moxey. I
Members of the household of I
cbUecto to'd ot leaut "sits o "'d the Greek premier are j him. and prevention of his act
the ed poll e'omcia. d "Ba?d "entical with those of Tnrkey. He also the f local police Schrank ,t ap
Jack s" home Rose's maid swore ! de8lred cede the island of Crete to Jw from this . ory s at the
; Becker was accustomed to breakfast
with her employer "nearly every day
. since Christmas."
; Two waiters of the Union Square
j hotel, told of frequent meetings be
i tween Roose and Becker in the hotel
1 dining-room, when they talked a long
time." One of the waiters said he
f-aw Rose pass the police lieutenant
"a roll of bills."
Mrs. Rosenthal described a meeting
of her husband and Becker at the
Klks' club New Year's eve, when, she
says, the lieutenant "put his arm
around Herman's neck and said he
was 'ready tn do anything for my hus
band at any time.' "
qimTKS BECKER AS TO "LOAN."
Discussing the raid made by Becker,
she testified Becker was at the Rosen-
thai home when detectives raided the
gambling place. She added:
"I heard a hammering on the door
and went down to let them in before
they broke the door in. I couldn't find
the key and went up stairs to see Mr.:
Becker. I said to Mr. Becker, 'For;
heaven's sake, what does this mean?' ;
Mr. Becker said. 'It had to be Herman I
or me.' Then he said, 'Tell Herman '
that debt is off. I'll go down and teK i
that man to call it off, as Herman and '
j I are square and he doesn't, owe me
tnai ii.aou. i saia, v nat man: lie
said. 'Never mind what man. Her -
man knows.
Mrs
Rosenthal told of having teen
her husband pass money to Rose.
The witness was turned over to the
defense for cross-examination.
"Was Rose a partner with your
husband in the gambling business?"
asked Mr. Mclntyre.
! ies, until early In March or the
luat cf P.hmarv ' ' m n 1 1 ..H ,Ka i.'i
. -. .
j .DUW1" " re
a . I . .
Dld you know of pIot t0 ""ult
planned w hen Rose,
! ', pp8 and Paul were
rhtn;""'-
j District Attorney Whitman objected ,
land Mr. Mclntyre excused the witness.
. rOI.I OCK Ul OTES BECKER.
Harry Pollock testified he saw
peok''" after the crime and
told him
Rose was at Pollock's house.
"All right tell him to stay there,"
said Becker, according to PoKok.
Mrs. Pollok also was a witness. She
I 8aid Rose bad come to her home the
day of the murder about 8 o'clock
the evening.
"Who came to see him there?" ask
ed Mr. Moss.
"Scheppa. Mr. Hart and another
man." said the witness.
"What did Mr. Hart say to you?"
' He said he u Mr. Hart. I asked
tint what his initials were. He said
'J. H..' and I said, 'Oh, yes; I was ex
pecting you.' Mr Rose had told me
he was expecting a man whose initials
were J. H."
"How long did he s'ay?"
ne j t - nuse ana siayea snout
two hours. The other man I didn't
recognize w&a with him."
WAR OPENED
BY TURKS ON
TWOSTATES
Bulgarian and Servian
Ministers Are Given
Their Passports.
ARMY NOW ON MOVE
Hostilities Begun by Ottoman
Troops at Various Fron
tier Points.
BELGRADE. OCT. 17. TWO HUN-
! DRED ARNAUT TRIBESMEN WERE
KILLED THIS MORNING IN A BAT-
TLE WITH SERVIAN TROOPS ON
THE FRONTIER NEAR PRIEPOLI.
KING PETER LEFT FOR MISH.
came general tnrougnoui me Hainan
peninsula. Turkey, for a week fight-
in with Monteneero. this mornine Is-
sued a formal declaration of hostill-1
ties against Servia and Bulgaria.
Greece was not mentioned in the of
ficial document delivered to the Ser
vian and Bulgarian legations at Con-
stantinople, ana tne ureen minister
was not asked to leave the Turkish
Turkey places the blame upon Bul- j
garia and Servia. Kiamil Pasha, pres- j
ident of the council of state and real ,
h(iad of the Turkish government, haS j
bem dsir0l8 a" aIonK to avoid a,
fight with Greece, whose Interests he '
Greece. The British cabinet he d
session this morning to disduss the wnen tne "ooseveit train was expeci
French proposal for a conference of pd but Sergeant Gleason, in charge
the powers. ' ,,ie Police detachment, saw him
ti'rkry ism es xotich
, , , . rore a policeman wno was oraerea to
Constantinople, Oct. 17. A formal , . ,
. , . , . o ., make the man move on could approach
declaration of war against Servia and;. . . . . .
r. , ... . . . . . . him, the man had seen Gleason s or-
Bulgana was published by Turkey to-' ' . ,. .
j r " der and disappeared.
aAy- i. j.. ,
Hostilities were opened at 2:30 this
! morning by Turkish troops at various
points on the Bulgarian and Servian
frontier. The Turkish army has been
ordered to make a simultaneous for-
ward movement. The powerful Turk
. ish army concentrated near tie Greek
j frontier has not yet been put into ac
j tion. Turkey today handed the Ser
; vlan and Bulgarian ministers here
j their passports.
! CREEKS FORCE BLOCKADE.
i Athens, Oct. 17. Fighting between
I Greek and Turkish forces stationed
i along the frontier began today. Two
Greek gunboats this morning forced
a Turkish blockade at the entrance of
the Gulf of Arta, one side of which is
Turkish and the other Greek. They
reached the Greek town of Vonitza
with little damage from the- heavy
Turkish fire,
ki; off for front.
j Sofia, Oct. 17. King Ferdinand left
j for the headquarters of the Bulgarian
1 army near the Turkish frontier.
MO. VI E.E(ilIS DEFEAT TlHhS.
i iodgoritza Montenegro, Oct.
17.
The surrender of Berana to the Mon
tenegrin forces was preceded by the
severest fighting. Seven thousand
l urks and Albanians escaped, but
1 200 troops, 14 guns and two months'
supplies were captured.
Under cover of darkness the Monte -
I . '
negrins stormed two important posl
tions of Rogame Heights and captur
, ed two Krupp guns with ammunition.
; During the night they entrenched
j themselves and the battle was resumed
j early ln the morning.
In tbe meantime a Montenegrin di -
visic
on under General Vukotitch broke
through the Turkish lines to the east
and completed an enveloping move-
irent
the earrtsnn raw that t Y e.n
I When
t were completely surrounded they
j hoisted the white flag. Touching
; scenes were witnessed when the
j troops marched through the city. The
i whole population gathered on the
'streets to welcome their mountain!
in kinsmen. People wept for Joy at what
T'ons or Koeame n ei irnr r anil r,r.tnr.irpiii1v in th puiki. nf nnunnora
they regarded the final release of the written has been made public. Sheriff
Servians from the subjection of cen- Arnold says Schrank has not attempt-turie8-
j ed to pass out of his cell anything
The king wired congratulations to i that has been written. i
the commanding general on his great.
v.ctory. The news spread rapidly ! cate a kind of mind known to alienists Springfield, 111., Oct. 17 The Jlli
long the whole frontier and there was i as paranoia, the mfnta; disease from nois Ami Horsethief association .m
1 l-'reat rejoicing
among the troops to
w hom the fall of Bernana was formal -
i I" announced.
Copper Dividend.
York, Oct. 17. Directors
New
t me Amalgamated copper company
; declared a quarterly dividend of 1
jptr ceut.
SCHRANK CLAIMS
FREE CONSCIENCE
Roosevelt's Assailant From
Cell, Declares Nothing 13
Bothering Him.
BULLETS NOT POISONED
Man Who Fires Shot Found to Own
$25,000 New York Prop
erty. Milwaukee, Wis., Oct. 17. "Why
shouldn't I sleep well? There's noth-
I ing bothering my conscience." This
was Schrank's remark this morning
when asked how he rested.
Schr&nk showed the sheriff several
pages of written matter which he pre
pared yesterday, but refused to give
them up. Part was written in German
and part in English. It was headed,
"Fortresses Are God," and consisted
of a large number of disjointed sen
tences pertaining to third term candi
dates. The writing did not make much
sense. Colonel Roosevelt, the district
attorney said, would not be summoned
to attend the trial. The large number
of witnesses who saw the shooting will
be sufficient.
SiO POISO rOCKD.
John Schrank did dnot poison the bul-
i C o.onel Roosevelt.
A chemical examination was made
of the bullet which were not used and
which were found in the revolver of
the assassin, but no trace of poison
was iouna. me examination was
made by Sommer and Worthington,
chemists, Wednesday.
"We made every kind of an exam
ination possible," said Mr. Worthing
ton, "but there was not a single trace.
Of course, there is a chance that the
one he used might have had poison on
it, but it is hardly possible, since it
was one of several bullets he might
have used and which were not pois
oned." MAIE EARLIER ATTEMPT.
One of the striking stories of the
Roosevelt 6hootjng in 'Milwaukee con
cerns an earlier effort of the assassin
iuimwiu Diauuu, iuukthhs auui.
there and ordered him sent. away. Be -
' v Buspeci t?vi y uouy 111 a
like this," said Sergeant Gleason, "so
i no special report was made to head
quarters of the man's behavior. How
I ever, after the shooting, when I saw
I Schrank at headquarters, I recognized
him as tjie man we had driven from
the station at 6 o'clock.
! District Attorney Zabel announced
: that, inasmuch as Schrank has told
the police that he has $25,000 worth
of property in New York, he will!
I svenuousiy oppose any axiempi ioand usually had $25,000 of pubiic
, havA the eniirt name an attnrnev tn r,,nu in . . ... .u:.. ..
! d(,fend Schrank when he comes up for
trial. He says that the state law per-
mining the court to engage counsel
for prisoners applies only to poor men
unable to pay for their own defense,
and that as Schrank has property the
court will not be permitted to name
a counsel. So far Schrank has not
manifested any desire to see a law
yer, and the local lawyers are not
looking for the opportunity to defend
him.
ENGAGES THREE ALIENISTS.
District Attorney Zabel has taken
all the preliminary steps for the effort
of the state to prevent the success
of any possible plea of insanity. It
was learned that Zabel yesterday1
named a commission of three alienists
to test Schrank without his knowl- i
edge, watch his acts and converse '
i with
him, and it is understood that
these men have been in the jail al- j
Zabel has not given out the names
' of the commissioners, but inasmuch
i as Dr. Wa ter Kempster, one of the
j alienists in the Guiteau trial, who tes-
l titled for the government at that iime,
is a Milwaukee man, it is presumed 1
that he Is one of those chosen. He is
known widely for his work in this
branch of medicine. There is no sur-,
, miuo u t t K i .1 t ; . i , t , . . ,r.,.
alienists, except thev mav be men;
from the county asylum. Zabel says!
if the first commission is not certain)
in its report he w ill name a second I
commiHsion i
Schrank put. In moKt of yet-.terday
j writing, but so far totting he has
The letters found on Schrank indi-1
which the slayers of Garfield. McK in
1 lev and Mavor Carter Harrison. Chi -
I cago. as well as Harry K. Thaw suf
.fered. in the opinion of Dr. F. F.
Fowie, first assistant physician at the!
of 'Milwaukee county asylum for the in-:
sane.
NEW W4V
TO CARRl PISTOL.
Schrank had evolved a way to carry
SOX WIN TODAY
Chicago, Oct. 17. Cheney
and Archer for the Cabs, and
Lange and Schalk for the Sox,
were announced as the batter
ies for today's game in the city
championship series.
The Sox won today's game,
8 to 5. This ties the two teams,
each having won three games.
his revolver so that It would be at
all times easy to get at) and at the
same time be out of sight. He cut a
hole In his lower vest pocket on the
left side. Through this hole he push
ed the barrel of the revolver, allowing
it to extend down between Mb troiis-'
ers and body, so that only the handle
" iu nns rDv. jmuatru xu luis man
ner It was not visible and was obtain-1
able at once. Schrank says he car-
ried the revolver In this manner for - . - r , .
days. County Convention Delegates
Schrank wants to be let alone. He
is tired of the crowds of curooua peo
ple. "Now, Schrank," said Sheriff Arnold,
"a number of people have asked to
see you; several newspaper men out
side want to talk with you, and there
is a man who wants to take your pic
ture. Do you want to see them?"
"No," said Schrank, "I am tired. I
have told all that I know and I am
not going to talk any more. They
have taken about 40 pictures of me,
and that ought to be enough for the
newspapers in the entire United
SUtes."
Schrank Is Indignant because sever
al of his questioners have seemed to
doubt some of his statements. I
"I have used my own money all the
way through. When I get my papers 1
here you will find out I own property
in New York a flat building. I have
the deed for it in my suitcase in the
Mosely hotel. I don't belong to any
organization and I want people to be
lieve that."
TIlorGHT FRJRNIX MIGHT COME.
Schrank told Sheriff Arnold not to
permit anyone to see him unless some
friends from New York came.
"Are you expecting friends from
New York?"
"No, but some might come.
"Who are those friends?"
"Oh, just some friends," he answer
ed. "I guess tliey won't come any
way, so it doesn't matter."
Schrank was asked whether he
wanted to talk with a lawyer.
"Well," he ri-plied, "if I don't get
one the stato will assign one to repre-
sent me, will it not,
He was tol dUiat the court had the
power to appoint a lawyer.
IS GONE 3 WEEKS;
HOLDS BIG FUND
Aurora, III., Oct. 17. Alfred A. Mot
tinger, 35, a prominent, citizen of
Plaiufield who left town three weeks
ago, has not boe heard from or seen
since. He was clerk of tho villago
hoard and clerk i,T the w honl lumni
KZr. His wife and relatives Xv
j him temporarily deranged. He was
iwico county clerk of Will county.
MOTHER SEEKING
JOHNSON'S CLERK
Chicago, Oct 17. The police today
questioned Jack Johnson, champion
pugilist regarding tho whereabouts of
Lucile Cameron, li, for whom her
mother in Minneapolis asked a search.
The girl is employed as cashier at
Johnson's cafe. The pugilist said he
kneiw where the girl was located, but
refused to give the address, pleading
the girl was anxious to avoid further
notoriety because of the recent suicide
of his wife, to whom Miss Cameron
was companion.
Captain Nootbaar said he learned
noinmg 10 iena to snow Johnson wab
to blame in any way for the girl's
v. hereabouts.
1 DEAD, 4 HURT IN
AN AUTO WRECK
Chicago
of a trad
killed an
oid daughter and Mrs. Walker and her
I
daughter were seriously injured today
when Priors automobile left the road j
r. a ,tai.ri hill - i- If I ri I a a unkii.r. I
and turned over.
A New Mlidcmeiner.
- . ak the Ktate lf-cihlfitiirc tr, r.wu u
i which will mu it & ..tru ..'
- ' pass on property owned by farmers un-
lees they have secured the consent of
the farmers. This was decided upon
at the annual convention held in this
city yesterday and which was attend
. f.H hv 2lifl rielr-patcn rcr,r..t.r,lir. tr
- - r3 . . ... ... . Luab
many districu in the state.
, Oct. 17 C. W. Prior, fdltor zpy;f:fM
e publication, was infetautly , h'7Mf' ' .W:Ate'&'&
d Mrs. Prior and her 4-year- I ;lfl
BUYOPVOTES
OF MEN JOST
LII(EGATTLE
Detroit Primary is Thus
Described by Taft
Supporter.
LAVISH USE OF MONEY
Demand and Are Paid as
High as $300.
Washington, Oct. 12. Lavish use ot
money by supporters of President
Taft iu the Michigan primary cam
paign was charged before the Clapp
committee today by James O. Murfln.
a Detroit lawyer. Murfiu said when
j he and Captain Alger raised $1,500 and
offered it to John D. McKay, in charge
of the Taft campaign, McKay Buld "he
had plenty money more than he ever
had before iu any campaign." Mur
fin testified he understood McKay to
have said that candidates for dele
gates to county conventions were
"holding him up" for aB much as $300
er.ch.
MOST (OHRl'FT KNOWN.
"It is a matter of general knowledge
that the primaries in Detroit this year
were tho most corrupt on both sides
ever known," said Murfln. "Just as
bad on one side as on the other, but
our people were the most skillful and
we got the delegates. But both were
absolutely rotten. Both sides barter
ed for delegates like so many sheep.
Some accepted money from both
sides."
KEW YORK BANK RECORD.
"A copy of the republican national
committee's bank account of 1904 at
the Fourth National bank, New York,
placed ln ecidence today, showed one
deposit of $240,000 in the latter days
of October of that year. That was the
sum of the disputed "Harrlman" fund
and the approximate time of its col
lection. Chairman Cortelyou of the na
tional committee of 1!04, paid Treasur
er Bliss told him there were no con
tributions from Standard Oil. Cortel
you also said Roosevelt was not active
in the 1004 canipuign.
Frank Munsey testified his total con
tributions to Roosevelt's campaign this
year were $11S,(HiO. His pre-conven-tion
contribution to the national cam
paign was $17,0(H, and the balance
was given to the state committee
Munsey estimated the total expen
ditures of the Roosevelt pre-conven-tion
campaign at $574,000, not includ
ing "dribiets" of live and ten thous
and. I.AWSON OX PARKER FIND.
Thomas W. Law son of BoHton told
the Clapp committee he understood the
Standard Oil "had contributed" to
Tarker's campaign for the presidency
in 1904. He said he once supplied
"proof In a general way" that the com
pany spent $",00,000 to $700,000 iu Mr.
Parker's behalf.
LIE HELPED DOWN"
TEDDY 'IS ASS ALL ANT
Cochems.
Henry F. Cohr ins, Wisconsin pro
gressive lea'ier, was on'-; of the ra'-n
who helped down Joiiii Shrank, the
would-be assassin of Colonel Roosevelt
at Milwaukee. Cochems is a graduate
of the T'niversity of WiscoRKin and of
Harvard, and was a famous athlete
whiie in college. He demonstrated that
he still nosesses some of his athletic
- ; prowess when he helped Martin. Rooae-
i i-i.li'o cl.nr...r t,V.w
' - . d dv .."i b..i- i, uu . u nun U1HIIU
Teddy's a&saUiant, '
V
Henry F
I

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