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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, January 10, 1913, HOME EDITION, Image 11

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'THE ROCK ISLAND ARGUS. FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1913.
11
3C
Great
eiMi
a i mi
OF ALL HEAVY WEIGHT
ID AT
YOU KNOW WM AT THAT MEANS
i
TWICE a year, JANUARY and July, we conduct these sales to dispose of all surplus stock, as we find it much better policy to close
out ail remaining stock at Big Reductions in preference to carrying it over until the following season, as style's and
prices are constantly changing, we also prefer to begin each season with entirely new goods . . . Whenever we advertise a sale, it is a sale
in every sense ot the word. We do not go to market and buy up a lot of cheap, poorly-made and shoddy junk, made up especially for
fake sales, as many clothing merchants are in the habit of doing (as we prize our reputation as reliable merchants too highly) but take our regular stock on hand as clean and up-to-date a stock of clothing and fur
nishing goods as can be found in the tri-cities and place it on sale at prices that will move it out in a hurry.
25 Reduction
On men's and young men's fancy suits and overcoats 25 Off
On fur overcoats ." 25 Off
V-Neck coat sweaters 25 (o Off
Turtle neck sweaters 25 Off
Fancy vests 25 Off
Bathrobes i 25 Off
Smoking jackets 25 Off
Wool knit vests . 25 Off
Cardigan jackets and numerous other lines 25 Off
20 Reduction
Black and staple overcoats
Cravenettes and raincoats
20
20
Off
Off
Men's and boys' staple suits 20 Off
20 Off
Off
Off
Off
Men's and youths' pants
V11UU1CU O OU-lkS ............. J jC
Duck and sheep lined coat3 20
Fur gloves and mittens 20 Off
Regular collar flannel shirts 20 Off
Mufflers cf all kinds 20 Off
Fur caps and other lines 20 Off
10 Reduction
Men's, boys' and children's black and bine serge
euiti and pants 10 Off
Byron and shawl collar coat sweaters 10 Off
Military collar flannel shirts .10 Off
Fancy dress shirts
Jersey sweaters ...
Silk or fleece lined gloves and mittens
Union suits
Caps of all kinds ,
Tennis gowns and pajamas
Beys' knee pants and shirt waists
Suit cases and traveling bags
Wool knit gloves and mittens and ojher lines
10
10
10
10
10
o
10
IU1
met
10
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
,r,0 small size men's suits.
Hold up to $15, your choice .
25 straight knee pants suits.
Bold up to $5.00
High School Pennants Half Price..
1
't ;
i
S6.95
$1.95
A lot of men's silk and wool shirts and
drawers worth $3.00 per garment
35 double breasted suits,
sold up to $18
.$1.93
$9.85
25 pairs youths' long pants,
sold up to $5.00
Bradley mt-flers,
50c values
$1.50
38c
25 black double breasted suits.
Sold up tof 22.60
One lot'of f&ncy trimmed flannel shirts
$1.50 values
$11.95
79c
Look for Our Bargain Table During this Great Sale.
SALfc PRICE FOR CASH ONLY
ULLEMEY
Oo Mini
46 Rock Island's Best Value Clothing House9'
1724- Second Avenue
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WASHINGTON SURRENDERS TO SUFFRAGETS; SOCIETY
THROWS OFF RESERVE AND BIDS FOR PLACES IN PAGEANT
: Wfl-vv ,.:v5... lb
t r
r.
Left to right: Mrs. O.
Mrs. Rosalie Jones
vey W. Wiley.
Washington. Washington society (
womea have thrown off the reserve j
which has characterized their attitude'
toward the suffrage movement ever
since it beginning and are clamoring
for places In the grand suffrage pa
W "4.
to be held with Mrs. Belmont as the
chief attraction.
A big feature of the parade, which
will be in charge of Mrs. Glenca 8.
ts opn?d up their pocke'books snd ' Ttanln, will be the suffrage brigade.
s ... j : . i i j i , . i w r 1 n 1 ( T
rade which is to be held here the day '" wu i.r.i aoj.uon. . JUJlca,
iu me :uritge cause. cu nopeiui IB1 .uicu kiiikicu iue iiieuiiua reteni-
the outlook et the present time that j ly by marching from New York City
plans are already afoot for taking j to Albany. The brigade -will march
larger quarters. I from New York to Wsshlngton an1
Among those who have been mostw;u have prominent place in the
active in converting the society wo- j P6rflo.
men is Mrs. Harey W. Wiley, Mrs.; The enthusiasm engendered by the
William Kent, wife of the millionaJrs j suspicious openlrg of the natlo.nel
California congressman, also has been I headquarters, has risen to such a high
prise -he other day when their mod-, wy ctlv- Miss Alice Paul, whose leasers here are now
ft teadquartors. just opened on F Personal at ractior.s few wUl deny, is j Predicting that the state campaigns
street, the city fashionable shoppii n charge of the r.ew.y opened head-wi11 0Q become subsersive to the na
thwoughfare began to hum and buzz Quarters, and her presence has had a ! cal campaign, and Washington will
!th the excitement of Urge crowds Potent effect in securing male as well j be tc center of the movement.
of society women ct high degree who ( 9 female convert.
fairly tumbled over one another in j Mrs. O. H. P. Pelmont, one of tho
'he scramble to get favorable post- J most active suffragets in America, will j
tions In the line of march. It was In
morons reading when first issued. One
day a department store in New York
ndvortised Supir-Cured Hams at 4c a
lb" Knttier cheap, you s;iy? Well, 130
odd persons thought ho too. for that
was the liiimber thnt asked for the ham
at this ridiculously low price the morn
ing the ad. appeared. It transpired
thut the printed proof O. K.'d by the
grocery buyer nnd sent down to the
newspaper ofline for insertion In the
day's issue read "14c a lb." The first
numeral had simply dropped out of
Fight; 12," sales were made at a Iohs of
10 cents pei pound. Woman's Home
Companion.
MODERN OCEAN LINERS."
before Wilson's inauguration.
The determined little band of suf
fragets who planned the parade were
fearful a: the beginning that they
would not be able to Interest the so
ciety women of the capital who have
long and successfully shielded them
selvei from Innovations and the fem
inist movement. Imagine their sur-
Their Double Hulls Defy Hidden Rocks
and Derelicts.
In the band of 'a skillful marine
architect much more has been accom
plished with steel construction than
the mere economy of space. The safe
ty of vessels at sea has been enor
mously increased until in the highest
type of modern ocean Liners the ele
ment of danger is virtually eliminated.
The marvelous ingenuity displayed
throughout this frreat fabric of steel In
guarding against every possible con
tingency of the sea cornea to the av
erage landsman as a surprise. A great
liner of !o.u00 tons may be controlled
by a single hand. The complicated
machinery for safeguarding the shin
is practically automatic.
The bottom of the great hull of the
liner Is doubled, the inner shell being
strong enough to float the ship even
If the outer hull be completely torn
away. It Is exceedingly unlikely that
water wmiid ever reach this inner
shell through accident to the ranln hull,
but the precaution la taken so that If
It should strike a bidden object It will
prove sbsolutely Invulnerable The
shipwrecks of the past caused by run
nici; upon hidden rocks, derelicts end
Icebergs ere thus completely eliminat
ed. M. R Cea In Cass lei-s Magazine.
STARTLED THE BISHOP.
Cheapest Hams Ever Sold.
Sometimes an error creeps into the
published announcement of a big store.
arrive very soon, laden with suffrage ;
deed a great surprise to the suffraget arsuTncnts, and she eipec s to muke :
lPA.rtera mrA tViv .am mvn mnr . i '. rv. ivinrftHi th a I
prised when these same society iead-iof open-air itreet comer meetings Uttt reulu. although U may make bo-
d::e to the negligence of the proofrender
cr to the lomp jsitor la tLe printing of-
An Untimely Royal Letter and the
Message It Conveyed.
One night at 3 o'clock the bishop of
Orleans nm roused by a royal cou
rier wbu tin a iu hot haste brought a
dispatch fntn tiis majjsty Louis X?.
TJia bishop imagined that something
terrible bud happened. Tremblingly be
opened the pa kage and read:
"Mousieur the Bishop of Orleans My
dauchters wish for some preserved Or
leans quinces. Pray send some. If
you have none I beg that you will"
In this pnrt of the letter there was a
drawing of a sedan chair, and under
neath the chair the kind's letter con
tinued thus:
"Send Immediately Into your episco
pal town and get them, and, monsieur
the bishop, mny God have you In his
holy keeping. Louis."
Lower down on the page was this
postscript:
"The sedan chair does not mean any
thing. It was drawn by my daughter
on this sheet of paper, which I hap
pened to find near me.''
Greatly relieved, the bishop hurried
a courier into Orleans, procured the
preserves and sent them to his royal
master. Thomas E. Watson in "The
Story of France."
des ana for the helpful lines that come
to one's iulud iu hard places. Home
Progress Mugazine.
A Good Stove Lining.
A good stove lining, one that will
last two years or more, can be made
from blue clay. Brick clay or one that
does not contain much snnd. Is good
also. Clay found In salt water marshes
laone of the' best for stove litilngs.
The clay most be reduced to a paste
about like putty. The bod for llnlntc
should be brushed clean and moistened
before the clay is applied. Put on with
hands, smooth with a trowel or thin
piece of board. National Magazine.
All the news all the time The
Argus.
Value of New Ideas.
" Some large business firms employ a
man whose sole duty It Is to rend ev
ery trade Journal, every technical pa
per or pamphlet and every majrazlno
In order to get new Ideas ebotu 'he
conduct of tbelr business. Such lnfor
matlon Is laid each day before 'be
beads of the various departments, who
in turn pass It down the line to men
nnder them and see that the new Idea
Is tested. By this means each worker
is kept In touch with what other men
are doing in bis particular line, and so
his personal efficiency la increased. Al
most everything can be done in a man
ner a little better than the present
way, and modern business demsud
to know and practice the best. Dlog
etiea carried around a cup to drink wa
tar out of till one day he saw a" Cog
Upplng water with his tongue. Us
threw away bis cup snd afterward
drank water out of the palm of bis
band. Be got from the dog a new
Idea. Louisville Courter-JournaL
i mrm - - . m m m Mr w
r W mW WJ w - - H . - - 7. ItJ M
fj:z 4ja. - . ;v Iff
Poetry and the Child.
Read poetry to the chlM. Read easy,
simple verse, read nonsense verse,
read real poems, rend sometimes such
poems as "Thanatopsis" and hits of
"Paradise Lost." Of co-irse the child
will not understand the thought, hut
he will enjoy the sound, and he will
unconsciously Icsrn the words Poetry
was never meant to he rend to oneself,
but always to bo rend aloud or recltid.
It Is harder than proe. The-order of
the words Is often like our everyday
speech, and the words themselvee are
frequently different. Here especially
childreu need help. If tbey find It
they learn to love poetry, and there
are few things that so sweeten life as
Lift)C.ulaa love tot poetry for Its beau-
2
ByMr&Janet
MKenzieHill
Ms F
Our instructions to the famous editor of the Boston Cooking School
Magazine were : "Get up a book of recipes of the things people tke best.
Find the best way to make and bake each one. Then wrile it out so plainly
that even an inexperienced housewife can't have a failure,"
"The Cook's Book" was the result. Some of the 90 recipes were origi
nated, many of them were improved upon, and aQ were personally tested by
this best known authority on cooking in America, and she tells so clearly how
she made everything that one cannot go astray.
While some of the cakes and pastry are elaborate enough for any occasion
the recipes are all thoroughly practical and call for no expensive a. J unusual
ingredients. In addition to telling how to make them.' the book is beautifully
illustrated in colors showing how to arrange and serve the dishes afpctizingly.
More than half a mi'lion of "The Cook's Book" are now in use in Amer
ican households. Yet the demand is constantly increasing. Many send for
two or three at a time to give to friends or young house
keepers. Don't depend on borrowing one from a
neighbor have one of your own.
How to Get "The Cooks Book"
la every 25c ca of K C Biking Powdet is pecked e
colored certificate. Send a oar of theo certificates ttae
it ob a poital card ft you like) with yooc same and ad
dicts plainly written, and "The Cook's Book will be
mailed free of cLarge. Only one book foe each ffiVstn.
Addrt Jaques Mfg. Compjuiy, Chicago
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