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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, April 24, 1913, HOME EDITION, Image 1

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ROCK
AND ARGU
Associated Press
Exclusive Wire
SIXTY-SECOND YEAR. XO. 160.
THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1913. TWELVE PAGES.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
S, iBOl EDITION
GET SCUTARI
BACK ONLY BY
FORCEARNIS
Montenegro Defies Power
of Europe to Take
Its Prize.
ULTIMATUM IS GIVEN
Austria Ready to Resort to
Bloodshed if Other Nations
Delay.
Cettinje, April 24. "Sen
tari is from today Montenegrin'
was the defiant reply of King
Nicholas today to the European
invitation to surrender the hard
won Turkish citadeL
The king made this state
ment in the course of a speech
delivered from the balcony of
the royal palace. Among the
audience were ministers of the
Balkan states who came to con.
cratulate him. He added:
"Should Europe stIH think of
s catching Scutari from Monte
negro, which has given her life
blood to take" it, Europe will
have to carry out the task by
force of arms.'
tinATtm CIVKN.
London, April 24. "Take
immediate combined action to
turn the Montenegrins out of
Scutari or we will do it alone,"
declares a circular cote by the
Austro-Hungarian government
fo the powers today, fffhenote
' vifWM Mini n iiiiif--
PRKSTIUIS IS KICDAJKaBKED.
Austria-Hungary declares she
cannot permit the Montenegrins
t( flout the decision of the great
powers. The prestige of Euro
pean nations has been violated,
says the cote, and Austro-Hun-gary
demands that the powers
decide promptly on the steps to
be taken to restore that pres
tige, adding if the powers are
unable to reach a speedy deci
sion she will see to it herself,
that the wiQ of Europe is re
spected and the Montegrins va
cate Scutari.
Berlin. April 24. There were many
indications today that, the German gov
ernment and public regard the Knro
pean situation as critical. A high dip
lomatic oflkaal paid;
"Kurope has entered another crisis
as grave as that which preceded the
A ustro-Russian demobilization.''
PKKDKTi lH OK KOKfK.
An official of the press bureau of the
Herman forHgn office believed it prob
able force would have to be employed
lo expel the ManUn epriiis from Scu
tari. The official view 1s an the Uin
pran powers will wort together until
the problem is solved.
Tho stork marktt was demoralized
by fears of grave political complica
tion. ITALY rTTFTRKSTEIl.
Rome. April 24. Vwy active ex
changes of communications between
Rome and Vienna over Scutari are go
ing on, Italy aud Austna-Iiuugary be
ing directly interested in the question
of the future of Albania. The efforts
of Italy axe directed toward prevent
ing the Isolation of Austria Hungary
and convincing Mntenro of the ne
cessity of complying with decision of
the conference of Kuropean ambassa
dors at London,
Old Horseman Passes.
Milwaukee. Wia, April 24. Thom
as J. Dunbar, aged 72, a well known
horseman, who many years followed
the grand a resit, is dead here.
STOCK EXCHANGE
BARS 2 MEMBERS
New York. April 24 WUHam Mor
ris Imbrie and John V. Kirkner mem
bers of the stock exchange, today
were suspended from all privileges of
the Institution for Fix months, be
cause of acts "detrimental to the in
terest and welfare of the exchange."
It is understood they were found guil
ty of carrying accounts for an officer
cf a New Jersey trust company who
was recently sentenced to the state
prison at Trenton for embezslement.
The Weather
Forecast Till 7 p. m. Tomorrow, tor
Rock Island, Davenport, Moline,
and Vicinity.
Showers this afternoon and tonight,
cooler. Friday generally fair.
Temperature at 7 a. m 62. Highest
yesterday. 79; lowest last night, 57.
Velocity of wind at 7 a. m-, 13 miles
per hour.
Precipitation. .01 inch.
Relative humidity at 7 p. dl, 45; at
7 a. m., 73.
Stage of water, 8.7; a fall of .3 in
last 24 hours.
J. M. SHERIEIi, Local Forecaster.
ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS.
Evening star: Saturn. Morning
stars: Mercnry, Jnpiter, Mars, Venus.
Planet Mars in the east before sunrise.
BATCH OF MINOR
OFFICES FILLED
Washington, D.' C. April 24. The
president sent the following nomina
tions to the-seoate:
United States attorney northern
district of Iowa Anthony Van Wage
nan, United States attorney western
district of Wisconsin John A. Ail
ward. Conmrinakmer of labor statistics
Claries P. NeilL
Auditor of state and other depart
ments Edward D. Hearne, Delaware.
Commissioner of fish and fisheries
IlOgh II. Smith. Washington, D. C.
.Collector if customs John J. Bell,
Port Huron, Mich.
W. IL Cottrfil to be postmaster at
Princeton, J.
CottriU is a republican, and has been i ernor Johnson and the California le?;
assislant postmaster many years. The 1 Islature In framing a law regarding
I president has known him since boy-1
hood. i
RAIL FIREMEN TO
GET AN INCREASE
New York, April 24. Railroad lire
men are granted an increase in pay
estimated at from 10 to 20 per cent
by the award of the Krdmann act ar
bitration board in their case, handed
down last night. O titer claims of the
firemen are allowed, but the demand
for-two firemen on targe locomotives
to dented except in cama c $qp&ltxt
j"" TBflWfi&TrSjurfst for'which the fire
men fought, namely the standardisa
tion of wages based on the weight of
locomotives on drivers, was granted,
although the award provides that all
wa&es that were higher or conditions
that were better than fixed in the
award shall not be interfered with.
This provLsion affects a number of
railroads.
BROADER CONTROL OF
RAILROADS IS URGED
Iansing. Mich, April 24. The Joint ;
legilative committee which is inves-:
tigating the alleged irregularities of
the management and conduct of affairs
of the Pere Marquette railroad, now
in the hands ot a receiver, made its
final report today with the recommen
dation that the plate be given broader
control of the railroads and attributing
the Pere Marquette difficulties to mis
management and manipulation.
ADMITS HER BUSINESS
BUT DENIES HER GUILT
The defense in the case of Mrs.
Margaret Mixer, who is on trial in
the county court, charged with con
ducting a house of ill fame, is that
she was not in the business at the
time tlie information charges. On the
stand this morning Mrs. Mixer, who
Is also known as Grace Campbell, ad
mitted that she had conducted a house
of ill fame but declared that she had
"q-uit business" when ordered to do so
last September by the city authori
ties. She explained the presence of
another woman at her place on the
occasion of a raid by the police, by
saying that the woman had come to
he:- for assistance and that she had
taken her in for a week.
FRIEDMANN PATIENTS
IMPROVING, HE SAYS
New York, April 24. Dr. Friedrich
Franz Friedmann has issued a state
ment in which he deidared that ail of
the tuberculosis patients whim he
has treated with bis turtle serum in
this city have shown marked improve
ment, and there appears to be much
hope for their recovery.
"All unprejudiced and unbiased per
sons can now see the result of my
treatment." Pr. Friedmann said. In
two or three months every person
with his eyes open will be able to
see the result.
"In the patients here the night
sweats have disappeared. The roughs
and pains have gone. All of the pa
tients have taken on weight, and to
the unprejudiced mind all seems hope
ful." Guests of Baltimore.
Washington, D. C, April 24. Several
hundred delegates to the General Fed
eration of Women's Clubs went to Bal
timore today to be guests of that city.
j The morning session of the convention
was held there. The women return
j here for the evening session.
LEGISLATION
AWAITS UPON
BRYANVISIT
California Senate Will
Not Act on the Alien
Land Bill.
ON HIS WAY TONIGHT
Relations With Japan in Mean
time in a State of Sus
pense. Washington. D. C, April 24. With
Bryan ready to leave late today for
California to represent the president
at a conference with Governor Johti
son and members of the legislature,
the situation over the anti-alien laud
legislation insofar as it relates to re
lations of the United States and Japan
are again in a state of suspense.
I.KAVKS TOMOIIT.
After an hour's conference at the
White house last night President Wil
son directed Bryan to proceed at once
to Sacramento to cooperate with Gov-
the ownership of land by aliens that
wouf d not conflict with the treaty obli-
i gations of the United States, partic
ularly with Japan.
Mr. Bryan will leave Washington at
6:45 this eveningiand arrive in Sacra
mento at 4:45 next Monday.
WILL. AWAIT COMIAG .
Sacramento, Cal., April 24. No
further action will be taken on pro
posed alien land laws for the state
until after the arrival hi Sacramento ;
next Monday of Secretary Bryan of . ... , . , .
.. . ' . ! in both senate and house. There was
the state department. ,
This announcement was made last!an informal conference between sen
night immediately upon the receipt of jators, and the house met an hour ear
formal notification of the secretary's i Her than usual.
purpose to start from Washington to-
that here was no disposition to act
hastily and that all were agreed it
would be the part of courtesy to
President Wilson to await the arriva".
of Mr. Bryan bearing the views of
the federal government, before the j
land bills were brought out on the
floor of the senate.
It was stated that the new amend
ments to the bill before the senate
were in preparation but would not be
ma'le public nntil Mr. Bryan had view
ed them.
Tokio, April 24. The relations of
.Tanan and the United States were dis-
ousljed this morning by Premier Ya,
mamoto. He said they must remain
! peaceful, despite local disturbances.
and expressed absolute confidence that
American citizens, both official and un
official would demand that no discrim
ination be made and that matters be
arranged in a spirit- of fair play.
MURRAY TO GO WHILE
THE GOING IS GOOD
Washington, D. C, April 24. Comp
troller of the Currency Murray today
indicated he will leave the govern
ment service Saturday when his five
year term expires, even though his suc
cessor has not been appointed and
qualified.
MISS BORDEN NOT
KIDNAPED; ON LARK
New York, April 24. Miss Eamona
Borden is back at the New Jersey
sanitarium from which she was "kid
naped" late yesterday. According to
sanitarium authorities she returned
after dining with frieids in Newark.
"There is no mystery a boat it," said
a nurse at the hospital. "Miss Bor
den simply took a notion to take an
automobile ride with friends. That's
all."
Counsel for Gail Borden, the multi
millionaire father, explained it prob
ably was nothing more than a lark
on the part of Miss Borden.
GIRLS' SCHOOL INMATES
ESCAPE DANGEROUS FIRE
Duluth, Minn, April 24. The
main building of the Villa San eta
Scholastica was completely destroyed
by fire. The fire, which was of un
known origin, started at midnight in
the laundry. Sixty sisters and 65
girls between 12 and 19 years of age,
marched through the smoke-filled pas
sages and escaped.
WMANIGAL WILL GO FREE
AND "BEGIN LIFE OVER"
Los Angeles, Cal.; April 24. Ortie
McManigal, confessed dynamiter, and
a prisoner since April, 1911, will be
released within 30 days, according to
attaches of the district attorney's of
fice It is understood he will be giv
en his liberty without restricti'jn to
make his way promptly to some place
where he will be unknown, to
life over."
"stan
TARIFF DEBATE
ON IN CONGRESS
Washington, D. C, April 24. The
'tariff discussion was on acain todav
The house attendance was depleted
drecT members on a special train rfofJ
New York to attend the'.banquet as
guests of the celebration at the open-
t inrr nf on i fl i en Km ifi r
Hammond of Minnesota was the first
speaker cn the tariff. After a long,
I involved discussion of various tariff
j theories. Hammond urged a middle
i course between high protection and
absolute free trade.
"The democratic party is not a free
trade party," he said, "and so far as
1 can find it has never declared for
free trade." He undertook to show
the Underwood bill was drawn strict
ly in accordance with the tariff-for-rev-enue-only
princiixle.
Beginning the debate in the house
yesterday on the democratic tariff re
vision bill, Representative Oscar W.
Underwood of Alabama, the majority
'leader, predicted great relief for the
nation through the passage of the
pending bill. Representative Augus
tus P. Gardner of Massachusetts voic
ed the republican skepticism regarding
the country's future under such a tar
iff bystem and Representative Clyde
Kelly of Pennsylvania expressed the
opposition of the new prrgressive par
ty to all tariff bills framed by present
methods.
Mr. Underwood in outlining the bill
severely criticised the protective tar
iff theory based on the cost of pro
duction differences at home and
abroad, and , praised the competitive
tariff theory, declaring it would
strengthen American products into the
world's markets. He denounced the
raising of taxes by the protective tar
iff as unjust, because, he said, it taxed
equally the workingman and the mul
timillionaire. MAKE EXCUSES EARLY
TO SEE BALL GAMES
Chicago, April 24. The following
notice, gigned by Postmaster . Camp
bell, was posted at the postoffice to
day: "AH requests for absence owing to
funerals, lame back, house cleaning,
sore throat, headache, indigestion, et&,
must be handed in not later than 10
a. m. on the day cf the game."
CLARK LOSES
GONTESTFOR
A HOUSE SEAT
Springfield, IlL. April 24. The elec
tions committee dismissed the contest
brought in the 33rd district by Charles
Clark, republican, against Campbell,
republican, Hartquist, progressive, and
Werts, democrat, on the ground the
contestant failed to make a prima facie
leasee
LOVE AT LONG DISTANCE
jjj' r-J
INCOME TAX TO
YIELD $70,125,000
Washington, D. C, April 24. Demo
cratic leaders estimate that, exclusive
of the corporation tax, the Under
wood income tax will yield revenue
for the first year under the operation
of the bill as follows: '
Incomes, Number of
amounts. incomes. Revenue.
$ 5,000-10,000 . .... 178,000 5,340,000
10,000-15,000 53,000 4,240.000
15.000-20,000 ........ 24,500 3,185.000
20)00-25 JWD -...w. 10.500. 2,100,000
25.000-50.000 .
50,000-100,000
100,000-250.000
250,000-500.000
21,000 9,660,000
8,500 11,560,000
2,500 11,560,000
550 6,743,000
4,000-5,000 126,000
More than $1,000,000 100
630,000
5,826,000
Total
$70,125,000
TELLS DIPLOMATS
HIS PEACE PLANS
Washington, D. C, April 24. Secre
tary Bryan laid before the diplomatic
corps his plans for an International
agreement for peace. Almost every
ambassador and minister in Washing
ton was at the secretary's office at
noon in response eo his invitation and
heard bis explanation of the plan
which soon will be the basis of treaty
negotiations.
OFFICIALLY VOTE TO
END BELGIAN STRIKE
Brossells, April 24. Delegates to
the national socialist congress today
voted by a three-fourths majority to
terminate the strike and resume work
immediately.
A CATHOLIC BISHOP
AT SCUTARI SLAIN?
Rome, April 24. A report of the as
sassination of the Roman Catholic
archbishop at Scutari, J. Sereggi,
reached here today. To save the pon
tiff any sudden emotion, the report
was not communicated to him, al
though the improvement in the pope's
health was maintained and bis strength
is increasing. No official confirmation
of the assassination was received.
FATALITY DURING ROW
ATTENDING A STRIKE
Hopedale, Maes , April 24. The first
fatality in connection with the strike
at the plant of the Draper company,
textile manufacturers, occurred today
when an unidentified man was shot
and killed in a clash between police
and pickets on the outskirts of town.
Firing was general on both sides for
a few minutes. No other person was
struck.
Prince to Tour Canada.
London, April 24. The Prince of
Wales will not attend Cambridge after
leaving Oxford, according to informa
tion at hand from Oxford, but will fin
ish his university education at Mag
dalen college and start early next year
on an. extended tour of Canada. In
order that he may appear In military
uniform in Canada he will have a
commission in the Grenadier Guards.
Prince Albert will go to Cambridge
next year, as arranged, and will oc
cupy the rooms in Trinity college used
lis tha king while there.
WILSON SHATTERS
PRECEDENT AGAIN
Washington, D. C, April 14. WH
son's visit to the capitol today, the
third in his eight weeks of office, was
a precedent breaking trip as far as
capitol historians could say. There
is no record of any other president
going there to save time tn talking
about appointments. The president
arranged this visit so as to reach, the
pre6idotit'p.yggpdlv-in "ample 'tithe for
a conference before the senate con
vened at 2 o'clock.
The president summoned Senator
Townsend of Michigan, republican, to
inquire about J. J. Bell of Port Hur
on, whom he has In mind for collec
tor of customs there. Bell was de
feated for congress on the democratic
ticket last fall. After he had been in
the capitol one hour, having conferred
with 16 senators, including LaFollette
and Tillman, and 13 representatives,
the president went back to the White
house.
JAIL FOR MORE SUFS;
MAY STARVE AT WILL
London, April 24. Mrs. Charles De
spard, leader of the suffragets, arrest
ed last night for trying to hold a
meeting In Trafalgar square, was sen
tenced to 14 days' imprisonment in
default of the payment of a fine of
$25. Her companions were sentenced
to 10 days each.
Idon, April 24. The "hunger
strike" bill, designed by the govern
ment to do away with forcible feeding
of suffragets serving terms in prison,
and which has been called the "cat and
mouse" bill by the militant suffragets,
passed its third reading in the house
of commons last evening by a vote of
294 to 56. The bill will now go to the
house of lords. It allows the suffra
gets to remain on hunger strike and
suffer the consequences.
Manchester, England, April 24.
The immense window of the free
trade ball where John Burns, presi
dent of the board of trade. Is to speak
tonight, was blown out by a bomb ex
ploded beneath the platform early to
day. Police believe the bomb was
exploded prematurely and was Intend
ed for a militant suffrage salute to
Burns.
PLANS TO ATTEMPT AIR
TRIP TEXAS TO CHICAGO
Bay City, Mich, April 24. U H.
Deremer of this city will on May 1
leave Corpus Christi, Tex., where he
has been giving hydro-aeroplane ex
hibits, and try to fly to Chicago.
Deremer's course will extend along
the golf coast to Matagorda, Tex.,
thence north on the Colorado river to
Austin, where he will replace the
pontoons of his machine with wheels.
He will fly across the remainder of
Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas to Kan
sas City, thence he will follow the
Missouri river to St. Louis, again us
ing the pontoons. Thence up the Mis
sissippi to Rock Island, 111. At Rock
Island he will remove the pontoons
and fly to Chicago.
THOUGHT 77-DAY SLEEP
HAD BEEN BUT SHORT NAP
Cherbourg, France, April 24.
When Leon Jean, a rope maker, woke
up today be was amazed to find him
self in a hospital Instead of at home.
He bad been asleep 77 days, although
he thought he was In bed only a few
hoars. His health was very good.
He could not be awakened Feb. 6 and
his family cent him to a hospital
E DEATH
LIST CLIMBS
TO BIGFIGURE
Over a Hundred Lives
Snuffed Out by Explo
sion of Gas.
OTHERS CRAWL OUT
i Several Hours Before Extent of
lilt? LMdd&lCI LiUUlU DG
. Learned.
Pittsburgh. April 24. With the com-
Ing of dawn fresh crews took the
piaces of the tired workers who had
tolled unceasingly and braved death
throughout the night tn an effort to
penetrate the dark recesses of the
Cincinnati mine at FmVeyville, where
the explosion of fire damp yesterday
killed many men and -wrecked the
mine.
mn 23 BODIES.
Thirty-four men. as many as eonld
be worked m the mine with safety.
spent the morning clearing acwy piles
of debris and searching for bodies.
Up to noon 22 bodies had been brought
out, and it was stated that others lo
cated, would not be brought oat until
late this afternoon when ventilation
would be restored.
RAT J7S ARE rnCAJX
The rescuers-of the bureau of mines
are making headway in the endeavor -to
force air through the ruined entries,
and until this is done the exact num
ber of dead cannot be ascertained.
The bureau of mines gave out a state
ment the loss of life probably would
not exceed 75.
Thousands gathered tn the vicinity
of the mine are being kept back
from the property by the state con
stabulary. in aw m.d mine.
The Cincinnati mine had been, tat op
eration 80 years. Thirty years ago an
explosion bfcw in hie -cars through
tipple aijiijrfcbross the Monon :
gahela river.
VirMBKH RftCAPB.
Pittsburgh, April 24. The ltres of
scores of miners were snuff
ed out shortly after noon yesterday,
when a disastrous explosion occurred
in the Cincinnati mine of the Monon
gahela River Consolidated Coal and
Coke company, at Finleyvllle, about
27 miles southwest of this city.
Over three score of workmen In
the mine made thrilling escapes to the
surface, crawling most of the time on
their hands and knees through deadly
gas fumes and over debris. A number
sustained burns.
Rescue work was carried on with
difficulty on account of the Ore and
deadly fumes. The coal company
maintains a rescue corps patterned af
ter the mine force of the United
States government. Aid from the fed
eral mining experts, it is Bald, wag
declined by the coal company.
MINKKS CAN Till,!. NOTIIIlVCi.
But a few of the miners who reach
ed the surface were in condition to
talk. From these little could be gain
ed. Suffering from burns or fright,
the miners only knew that the explo
sion had occurred and that a large
number of men were either killed by
the explosion or asphyxiated by the
"after damp."
Several hours after the explosion
seven foreign miners crawled from
one of the entrances of the mine. All
were seriously burned. They could
give no connected account of condi
tions In tlie mine or their individual
experiences. They all said that tlie
"mine was full of dead people."
Business in Klnlayville was sus
pended. The greatest excitement pre
vailed and practically the entire com
munity rushed to the ill fated mine.
Relatives and friends of the men be
neath the surface were frantic. Many
of them had to be restrained.
KNTKAldCfcy UCARUEa
After a time a guard was placed,
completely surrounding the entrances
to the mine and all persons except
rescuers and mine officials were held
at a distance.
A gas explosion Is thought to have
caused the disaster, although this fact
has not been exactly determined. Fire
damp. It is said, may have been re
sponsible. Wilson to See Game.
Washington, D. C. April 24. Tho
president had a long list of engage
ments today but nevertheless planned
to attend the Boston-Washington ball
game.
NO OPPOSITION
TO LANDEE BILL
Springfield, 111., April 24. Senator
Landee's bill, authorizing the estab
lishment of a free state employment
office, where two or more contiguous
cities contain a combined population
of 50,000 or over, passed the seoat
38 to a.
IN

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