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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, April 25, 1913, HOME EDITION, Image 1

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LAND ARGU
Associated Press
Exclusive Wire
SIXTY-SECOND YEAR. NO. loi.
FRIDAY. APRIL 25, 1913. SIXTEEN PAGES-
PRICE TWO CENTS.
THE
ROCK
S. HOME EMM'
TARIFF TALK
IN HOUSE IS
EARING END
Moore Introduces Novelty
in Having Questions
Read By Clerk.
HE SUPPLIES ANSWERS
Primer Form Is Followed, Re
publicans Attacking Bill as
Misleading to Public.
Washington, D. C, April 25. With
only three more days left for general
debate on the Underwood tariff bill in
the hoL"ge, the prospect today was
the "neeeaure would pass the house
and go to the senate during the firs
wt-'.k Iti May. Representative J. Hamp
tra Moore, for the republicans, and
A. Mitchell Fa'racr, for the demo
era's, were leaders of the debate to
day. .Moore introduced a novelty and for
the first time in the history of con
ress, us far as nown, a speech on the
tariff was delivered by reading ques
tions from the speaker's rostrum and
iti'.- delivery of replies from the floor.
Moore's speech was a "tariff primer,"
fc Mowing the lines of Platos republi
can form. He, sent to the desk a set
of questions which the clerk propound
ed to him. and Moore, in his an
swers, ran the gamut of tariff legisla
t ion and tariff dogma.
RKTAU.H FIRST APT.
"When was the first tariff act
passed," asked the clerk.
"The first act passed was the tariff
iu't," replied Moore, "it was approved
by President Washington July 4. 1789,
and was regarded as an American
declaration of commercial independ
ent." "What do you mean by the Under
wod bill?" quuriud the clerk.
"The bill Introduced by Chairman
Underwood, exponent in the house of
: h theories of President Wilson." was
the reply. -
onnociUTS acctukd.
And so the questions and answers
ran on.
Moore charged the democrats with
r ntlnually misrepresenting the tar
iff questions, and declared the present
Payne law revised the tariff down
ward, and when the clerk asked why
the people complained if they enjoy
such wonderful progress, Moore re
p'led: "They listened to ambitions
politicians, agitators without consci
ence, journalistic organs with axes to
grind, magazine seeking pap. essay
ists who found it more convenient to
writ fiction than work, theoretical
college professors, n cm-producers gen
erally and a few sincere reformers
usually misinformed and frequently
misled."
OLNEY DEFENDER
OF CANAL RIGHTS
Washington. D. C, April 25. The
United States, as owner tof the Pan
ama canal, has the right to fix such
terms as it pleases and the neutrality
rf the waterway applies to its users
ouly and not to the United States.
This view was expressed today by
KJchard Olney, former secretary of
sUte, whose speech was heard before
n meeting of the American Society of
International law, which Olney did not
attend.
"If the qnostion is submitted to ar
bitration." Oitiey's speech continued,
"it should not be submitted to The
Hagire, but to a special tribunal. The
Hague would be partial as, admittedly,
all European powers are interested
in the outcome."
Pope Much BtUer.
Rome, April 25. The pope was
much better today. Cardinal Merry
Del Val told Bishop Schrembs of To
ledo, Ohio, that the pope "is suffering
from the consequences of an attack of
grip which would have passed un
noticed If it had affected an ordinary
person."
WORLD'S CHAMPS
VISIT PRESIDENT
Washington, D. C. April 25. The
liopion American league baseball
team, world's champions, went to the
exec...ive ethecs today and met Presi
dent Wilson, who shook hands with
t .u li player.
' i ll for-sivr you for what you did
to i.s yesti: day." snid the president
v ",h a laugh. ' It went all right as
! -.g as 1 was there. You took advan
te of my at::ce." The president
referred to his early departure from
- game 10 confer with Bryan. Wash
l " jr. ai sliced whes the president
The Weather
Forecast Till 7 p. m. Tomorrow, for
Reck Island, Davenport, Moline,
and Vicinity.
Fair tonight and Saturday, not much
chenge in temperature, probably light
frost tonight.
Temperature at 7 a. m. 44. Highest
yesterday C9, lowest last night 43.
Velocity of wind at 7 a. m. 7 miles
per hour.
Precipitation none.
Relative humidity at 7 p. m. 55 at 7
a. in. 74.
Stage of water 8.5 a fall of .2 In 24
hours.
J. M. SHERIEK, Local Forecaster.
ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS.
Evening star: Saturn. Mornltig
tars: Mercury. Jupiter. Mars. Venus.
Planet Saturn, moving eastward, soon
to be lost In the sun's rays.
SALOON LICENSE
RAISED TO S2,250;
Rockford, I1L, April 25. What is be- j
lieved to be the highest dramshop f.?a
in Illinois resulted from action by the
town of Pecatonica, the only "wet"
community in Winnebaeo coun'y. in-
creasing the fee from $1,5'0 to $2,250. j
The town has only two saloons
TIGER CONTRACT
SIGNEDOTCOBB
Detroit, Mich., April 25. Tyrus
Cobb at a local ho1 el today said he
"hoped" to come to terms with Pres
ident Navin of the Detroit club before
tonight Cobb admitted he does not ,
expect to receive Jl.ooi) Tor Lis sir-
vices this year. He said he had sim
ply made that proposition to Navin at3 '
a basis of negotiations, lie added, !
however, he had reason to believe
he would be offered more than the fig
ures he claims caused him to "held
out." If he signs today and is reinstat
ed Immediately by the national com
mission, he will not be able t,' play for
several dayB, he said, as he had playt ;1
no ball since early this month.
Cobb signed a contract,
were not given out.
Ti;e t.-mis
PLAN OF WILSON
SftTtSF!EdW
Tokio, April 25. Satisfaction Is gen- j
erally expressed here over the decis- i
Ion of President Wilson to send Secre-j
. ... I) . rv.llf.. . .. n.,,.!. . 1 , . .
legislators on proponed anti-aiien laud
legislation. The majority of the nowa-
papers of Japan adopt a more tranquil j
tone today, but the widely circulated
Osaka Mainjchi, independent, in a war
like spirit, poinis to tne Japanese neet (
as no toy, and says if forced to ac- ;
tion by discriminatory legislation, it Is j
capable of vindicating the national 1
honor.
London, April 25. "Secretary. Bry-; ..The gtate of rjunois ig a part of interstate state rates, presumably rea
an's peacj proposal, laid before the ; this comlIlissloni declared O Hara ! scnable in themselves, and having no
diplomatic corps at Washington yes- j Juul expressed his sentiments j reference to interstate commerce,
terday. lias all the simplicity charac- toward the shoe company. "I want to The commerce court denied the ap-
tenstic or uie great idea, says the
Evening Standard today, "but whether
practical, only time can show. Grav
est discredit will be reflected on any
European government which does not
welcome the communication and give
it the fullest and most sympathetic
consideration."
$1,500,000 STOCK
SENT TO BAILEY
St. Iuis. Mo., April 25. The name
of former Senator Bailey of Texas
was brought into the proceedings of
a suit of the National liana of Com
merce of St. Louis to recover $1,500,
000 worth of stock in the National
Terminal Railway company here to
day. The statement was made that
without the knowledge of the bank
directors the stock was taken out of
the bank and sent to Bailey.
Henry Clay Pierce testified he had
become Involved to the extent of near
ly seven millions through misplaced
confidence in the late J C. VanBlar
com, former president of the bank.
LEHMANN, CONVICTED ST.
LOUIS ASSEMBLYMAN, DIES
St Louis, Mo, April 25. Julius
Iehmann. former member of the St.
Louis municipal assembly, convicted of
bribery while Joseph Folk was circuit
attorney, died last night. He was par
doned by Governor Folk five years ago.
During the famous boodle trials be
testified that a $47,000 bribery fund
was distributed among IS members of
the municipal assembly at a "birth
day party at Lehman's home.
Gainsborough Bring $T OO.OOCX
Ixmdoc. April 25. Thomas Gains
borough's painting. "The Market Cart,"
out of Sir Lionel Phillips' collect ton,
sold at auction today for $100,004, a
record price for a Gainsborough.
Pioneer lllinoisan Is Dead.
Kewanee, IIL, April 25. James A.
Clark, a Henry county pioneer, and a
Urge tend owner, died yeswrday at
tLt age of 7b.
30 CENTS DAY
PAID GIRLS IN
OUR CAPITAL
Welfare Commission at
Springfield Brings Out j
New Facts. !
WAGES PAID BY MONTH
i Two Far.tnrv Fmnlnves fiivr.
TheirSShady i
Fpringfield, 111., April 25. When the .
senate "white slave" inquiry was re-;
sinned this morning, D. W. Venable, '
proprietor of the Victor hotel, was re
caUed to tne stand Questioned re-
gurdiug the circumstances under
which he secured and held the hotel, !
which he testified last nirht was run j
in a respectable manner, he said he !
had offered to sell the furniture and :
lease for $1,000 less than he paid for j
it. !
D. L. Philiip::. owner of a building .
in Jefferson street., w as examined rol- j
ative to his property, occupied as a!
saloon on tiie ground floor and an im- j
moral resort on the second floor. Phil- j
lips rented the building to the Seipp I
Brewing company and was not fan;;
ilir witn the conditions existing in the !
flat above the saloon, although he ua-ter:-tood
it was immoral.
y.:.r Barnes, 16. living in Second
street, testified she was wording for
the t'oates Watch and Tool company.
She was paid $3 for the first week,
then put on piece work, and was able
to earn only 30 cents a day.
Sylvia Kane, 17. offered testimony
similar to that of the Harnes girl.
Wages, she said, were paid once a
nvjr.th.
MiOtMKM EIH r.XrOHl TK1).
Ti:o International Shoe company, a
$25.')U0.y00 corporation, with a branch
i.i Springfield, was excoriated by the
inquiry. S. W. Derby, superintendent
of the local factory, was on the wit
ness TEtanu , touowing tne testimony i
of
lishment. and .assumed a fccstile It-
titude toward the committee. Derbv i,Tiu,!S,u" '? '"uB ia.raa,e
was answering questions in a low, ic-'rtes ,owrr than 'nterrfate rates
articulate voice. "Speak up, pleae.'W"' havc ,),'en hw 10 ? reason-
able. Because of the similarity of the
u I . , "stonnnhr. !
' " ' " ,
s:ul newspapermen cannot hear you."
"I clor.'t care anything about Uiem,"jlasJ Monday Hied a brief in mterven-
rasaonded Derbv. '
..j, we do'care declared Juul.
"This is the modern version of -the !
public be damned,'" interposed Chair-1
,nan 0-iara.
IJJ.S Hl .TIlM'.fHK. 1
Derby saw he had made a mistake.
"I m talking to you not to them," he
I .id. ted
teli vo nerbv. I. for one. wish I imd
the power to drive your concern from
the state. You are a disgrace to the
state.
"And. I want to add, one of the
greatest disgraces to the state," in
terposed O'Hara.
"We had some information regard
ing your concern," continued Juul.
MIST IlRFVG PA TROLLS.
"We learned of one poor girl that
worked for you being driven to pros
titution because she was paid only
$3.50 a week. We had to go Into exe
cutive session because the testimony
was so rotten" the public could not
hear it."
Derby was, asked to bring his pay
rolls before the commission next
week.
Agnes Kane, 21, formerly employed
by the International Shoe company,
told of Foreman Alexander of the box
department seizing girls and shaking
turui u.ey uu.p.easea. ana curs-
ing the girls when they failed to turn
out as much work as he desired.
HOLDS COMMISSION LAX.
Whether vice conditions have im
proved under the commission form of
government was a subject of inquiry
last night before the senatorial wel
fare commission.
Mayor John S. Schnepp of Spring
field who has been the city's execu
tive both under the old system and
under the commission form of gov
ernment, expressed his opinion before
the O'Hara investigating body at a
hearing which began at 8 o'clock in
the evening in the banquet ball of
the Lelaad hotel. He declared that
conditions in Springfield after two
years of operation under the commis
sion form of government are not qdita
as good as under the old system.
TfXL OF CAXPAJGlf FTWD.
That others believe to the contrary
was indicated when a woman keeper
of a house of ill repute was placed 03
the witness stand and questioned re
garding statements she is said to
have made relative to the raising of
a campaign fund to be nsed for the
purpose of overthrowing the commis
sion form of government at the next
election.
This woman, a Miss "O. F.. who
. nas aepi an evu resort in sprmgfielci M serious trouble. Nctody was in
ifcr tiiM years, &aid &he must hareijuied.
-rp" o.t-,T LCfr I TO- A CHERRY S"l r
IPOTATOSS!
, ' (-tr-v-
w ; a
w
'COMMERCE BODY
j BASKS RATE RULE
Washington, D. C, April 25. The
I commerce court upheld the interstate
'commerce commission's ordor in the
Shrtveport-Texas rate cases, and in
'many respects sustained the principles
iwbifh the railroads ars. asking the su
iprfme court to adopt in the 45 state
' rate cases await;ng decision. The eu-
preme court entirely upheld the pow
ers of congress and the Interstate
crmtiuat,ins .in case a sfate railroad
Shreveport case to the state rate
icazns. Attorney General McFu'.vnolds
Hon m the state rate cases with the
Wcme court, as a "friend of the
court. ' Attorneys for the stale ofi"uc ia auu,u,"u,KB' UB lu
Mi:inbota today filed their reply, but j edict published today in the Rhenish
expressed the opinion the Shreveport
deeis'on would not affect their case be-
cause 'n!lesota, as distinguished from
; Texas, is seeking to sustain the right
iof the state to establish a system of
' plication of the Lehigh Valley rail-
' i(ad for an injunction to restrain the
1 interstate commerce commission from
enforcing its order reducing rates on
anthracite coal from the Wyoming re
gion in Pennsylvania to tidewater.
New Jersey. Counsel for the com
pany urged that such reduction or
dered by the commission would cut
the income of the road about 4 per
cent on an alleged total valuation of
property of $312,000,000, which
amounted to confiscation. It was
maintained the company was entitled
to an income of 8 per cent. The com
merce court held that the case of con
fiscation was not made out, and in
effect that a carrier has no assured
right to earn any fixed percentage of
profit on an investment, regardless
of whether a particular rate was rea
sonable. been "kidding" if she said she would
oontribute $500 toward a fund to be
ralsed by divekeepers.
. . r
.119 IJIAUtUlLII I 1.11 lU:A3t9,
Mayor Schnepp was unable to tell
how many disorderly houses were
1 maintained in Spi ingfield's segregat-
ed district. He said that, while he
had direct supervision over the chief
of police under the old system, he
now refers all complaints to Commis
sioner Davidson, who has charge of
the police department. Mayor Schnepp
said that the police regulations for
bid the selling of liquor in any of the
evil resorts.
"Have immorality and prostitution
increased or decreased in Springfield
under the commission form of gov
ernment?" asked Lieutenant Gover
nor O'Hara.
"I am inclined to think they have
increased," replied Mayor Schnepp.
HOSPITAL PATIENTS IN
PANIC AT SEEING FLAMES
Chicago, IiL, April 25. Three pa
tients were carried to safety and 55
others were thrown into a panic to
day when a fire attacked a two-story
brick addition to the Chicago Union
hospital in Wellington street. The
; action of 20 nurses in coieting the
f fears of the excited nattrta nmMt.
THE CALL OF THE SOIL
VOR YJ A
- v -o- -it . j . i -ion ki ,..,- i
New Postmasters
Named
Washington, D. C. April 25. The
following new postmasters were nam
ed by President Wilson yesterday:
W. H. CHAPMAN, Clifton, I1L
WILLIAM TWOHIG, Galesburg, IIL
GEOHGE A. GRIFFITH, Rankin, IIL
J. F. GOOS, Sabula, Iowa.
FRED C. RICE, Roachdaie, Ind.
ROBERT E. SPRINGSTEEN. In
dianapolis, Ind.
SHERLOCK SWAN, Baltimore, Md. !
W. H. COTTRELL (republican),
Princeton. N. J.
otioTjcIriest
forbidden auto
Berlin, April 25. Roman Catholic
: rg?nen are xorniaaen to own or
Prussian bishopric of Treves. Tne
head of the diocese declares the use
of automobiles is inconsistent with the
humility which should adorn the cler
gy, and furthermore, automobiling has
been a frequent cause of financial em
barrassment of priests.
Treves is situated picturesquely on
the Mosselle river, probably the oldest
town in Germany. It Is rich in Roman
remains and in many monuments of
the early church. It Is a Catholic
stronghold of 50,000 inhabitants.
TWO MEN HANGED
IN STATE MEXICO
Socorro, N. M., April 25. Denied
commutation ot sentence to life im
prisonment by Governor McDonald,
two men, Irwin Frazer and Francisco
Granado, convicted of first degree mur
der, were hanged at 4:52 this morn
ing in the county jail. They were the
first legal hangings since New Mexico
was granted statehood.
HALF OF BELGIUM
WORKERS RETURN
Brussels, April 25. More than half
the Belgian workers who took part in
the strike returned to their employ
ment tcdav. but resumnticn tf work I
is irregular ia some part3 of the conn--the smallest cnild or or tne numaiest
try. Some trade unions ordered their j seaman 13 of greater import than are
men to begin today, others tomorrow, le profits of any transportation com
still others Monday, while a few were ;Pany or of any individual,
determined to remain cut un'il May 1. "The 6aice feeling applies in my
A disagreeable surprise met thoh if: .'i ! mind to the motor boat world. . I am
at factories in the suburbs cf Urus- ; myself, as you know, a motor boat
sels. When they appeared at the gates ; man. As such it has always been pos
thls morning to recommence work a l sible to comply with the regulations.
eld employes were refused admias'ca
and told they were discharged.
CHICAGO MILLIONAIRE
KID CAUGHT IN NEW YORK
Chicago, April 25. Thomas Water
man, arretted early today in Kcv
York charged v.lth tho theft cf
000 from the Drexei State bank here, '. thoughtful of saving a few dollars, puts
w&s a clerk in that institution, t-n.la ; his own life or the lives of others at
valued at $21,000 were also i;ald to j risk by going without lights or proper
have been stolen. The local police ! equipment, is himself giving no 'sqnare
learned Waterman was sper.ii.ng nion-dea!,' either to himself or to others. If
ey lavishly along the "greet vi.ita jthe rrpirit of compliance with the law
way," and was known at some cafes j prevails, there should be little diffi
the "miiiior.aire kid." iculty with tLe reg-olatioW
BRYCE QUITS HIS
POST AT CAPITAL
Washington, D. C, April 25. Brit
ish ambassador Bryce today laid down
the office he held here more than 6ix
years and left for New York to begin
his trip home. Tonight at New York
ho will say farewell to the United
States at a dinner of the Pilgrims' so
ciety and Monday he will meet his suc
cessor, Sir Spring .Rice, on his voyage
across the Atlantic.
Tbdrrrnid"Mrs. Bryce will go to
San Francisco and sail for Japan May
3. They will spend some time in
China and Japan, where Bryce will
study the evolution of the Chinese re
public, and thio proceed to London by
way of Siberia.
CHILD SITS UP IN
COFFIN; ONE DIES
Butte, Cat, April 25. While mem
bers of the family and relatives were
grouped about the coffin of Mrs. J. R.
Burney'a three-year-old son yesterday
listening to the funeral service the
body moved and presently the child,
clad in a shrouu, sat up and gazed
about the room.
The grandmother, Mrs. I P. Smith,
81, stared at the child, as if hypnotiz
ed, then sank into a chair, dead. As
she fell the child dropped back into
the coffin, from which it was quickly
snatched by the frantic mother.
A physician was summoned and
Laid there was no hope for the boy
and death came a few hours later.
Today there are two coffins In the Bar
ney home. The child and grandmoth
er will be buried side by side.
SECRETARY REDFIELD
ON POWER BOAT RULES
Washington, D.. ,C. April 25. Secre
tary of Commerce William C Redfleld,
under date of April 14, sent the fol
lowing letter to the editor of Power
Boating, indicating his Interest in
power boats, and that as bead of the
department of commerce he would see
that the "little fellows" got a square
deal
"I say that the proper principle to
set in making and enforcing the reg
ulations of the steamboat inspection
service seems to me to be that while
the rights and privileges and oppor
tunities of the sUramboat and steam
ship interests shall be candid, fulL
and fair consideration, yet the life of
uid I have eeen many occasions of
ifrridf.nt and injury arising from fail-
; ure to comply with them. . Of course,
.the 'little fellows," as you call them,
bhould get and will get a square deal,
but this leaves unsettled the question
what a 'square deal" is and to wl;n
the
square deal' should be extended.
Candidly, he who, careless of ruls or
MISS BORDEN
ELUDING ALL
F PURSUE
Clews Regarding Where
abouts of Young Heir
ess Fail of Results.
FATHER DIRECTS QUEST
Declares Daughter Had Been in
Atlantic City Hotel in Com
pany of Three Women.
New York, April 25. The New York
police department officially began to
day a systematic search for Romona
Borden, 17-year-old daughter of Gail
Borden, millionaire milk dealer. Bor
den himself asked the police to take
up the case after lie held a long con
ference with the detectives at mid
night Although it was reported yes
terday she had returned to a New Jer
sey sanitarium, it now appears that
neither Borden nor the family physi
cian nor Borden's lawyers have the
slightest idea -where ehe is.
A girl answering in many ways her
description sailed yesterday from New
York on the liner Cincinnati. A wire
less -was sent to the captain of the
vesseL
Borden said he believed his daughter
was either in this city or nearby, and
declared, if necessary, he would hunt
for her all over the world.
"Someone win pay dearly for this,"
said the father. I know my daughter
1b not back at the sanitarlnm and I
am pretty positive she has not gone
abroad."
Borden added the initials on the suit
case in the automobile that took Ro
mona from the sanitarium rovealod the
identity of one of the women who aid
ed in his daughter's flight. Inquiry at
this woman's home in Brooklyn show
ed she went to Atlantic City Wed
nesday. .Word from Atlantic City said
a girl answering Romona's descTptie9r'
left a hotel yesterday afternoon with,
three women and took, a train for New
York. 1
MUST SWEAR WARRATP.
A report was current this afternoon
that Miss Romona Borden had been
found by a Jocal detective agency em
ployed by Borden. The report was not
verified. The authorities today refus
ed to instruct local detectives to join
in the search unless a search warrant
was issued charging waywardness or
abduction, Borden will decide later
whether a warrant is to be issued.
SHAFT GIVES UP
33 MORE BODIES
Pittsburgh, Pa., April 25. Thirty
three additional bodies were brought
to the slope of the ruined, Cincinnati
mine this morning, making the total
bo far recovered 61 Ten additional
names were added to tbe missing dur
ing the night. While no official state
ment of tbe loss of life has been given
out by the company, those at the mine
place the Iors at 115. It may be sev
eral days before the exact extent of
the loss is determined. - Preparations
to care for the widows and orphans are
under way and for the present they
are being looked after by the coal com
pany. Fourteen bodies were located short
ly before noon. This makes the known
dead C5. There are 27 more to be re
covered. SUFS PUT A
ON A BANK'S STEPS
Cardiff, Wales. Aprjl 25. "Votes for
women, R. I. P.," were the word
painted on a bomb found thiu morn
ing by a patrolman on the doorsu p o.
Lloyds bank in this city. The fiik-3
attached was burning when discovere't
and was pluckily seized anl extin
guished by the policeman.
EXPLOSION KILLS
2 ON NEW SHIP
Hamburg, Germany, April 25. Two
men ere 5' ai and Ciree dylug out of
1 oWit inj;u .vd by an csplosion of beii-
Ei.ifc iast night on board the new Hamburg-American
liner Imperator at
Cuxhaven. The accident was caused
by a workman filling his cigar light
er from a benzine tank. About 2,000
workmen were on board, completing
the furnishings of the cabins, eta, ia
readiness for the trial trip. In which,
the crown prince Is to take part.
RS
rl

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