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Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, August 04, 1913, HOME EDITION, Image 1

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RGU
Associated Press
Exclusive Wire
SIXTY-SECOND YEAR. XO. 249.
MONDAY, AUGUST .4, 1913. -TEX PAGES
PRICE TWO CENTS.
THE
ROCK
BLAND
A
HOME EDITION
BIG CHANGE
IN EXPRESS
RATES 0CT.1
Reductions by Commission
Will Hit Companies
Hard.
INVESTIGATED 6 YEARS
Block System of Computation
Lays Basis for. Simpler
Freight Schedule.
Washington, Aug. 4. Reductions of
express ratfs which will cost the com
panies fully $26,000,000 a year, approx
lmatfly 16 per cent of their gross rev
enue, was ordered by the Interstate
Commerce commission today to be
come effective on or before Oftiober 1,
1913. ,
.nil atvo ru.n iix.t:n.
Th most important change pre
scribed is a modification of the present
graduated BaIo of parcel rates. One
nundred pound rates for short dis
tances either have been left unchanged
or slightly reduced, for the longer dis
tances they have been lowered. For
f.O pound or less all rates have
bern practically reduced. For packages
of more than four pounds going more
than 2o( miles and less than 2,ooo the
new express rates are generally low
er tlun the pan-el poBt rates. For
more than 3,ouo miles, the rales are
practically the same.
The report and order of the com
mission, prepared by John H. Marble,
ere in affirmation of the findings of
former Commissioner Lane, now sec
retary of the interior.
11 T Oi l' Ylll.l.loNM OF RATE.
Hy prescribing a so-called block sys
tem dividing the I'ulted States into
D.'iO blocks, averaging 2.500 spuare
miles, as originally proposed by Lane,
Jtoo.ooo.ooo different rates now publish
ed by express companies, will be re
duced to less than 650.000 and the in
terstate commerce commission be
lieves the system points a w-ay to the
solution of the existing m:izc6f freight
rates.
KXPKJT IK. ir.
The general impression in official
circles is the express companies will
attempt to test by legal means the con
stitutionality of the commission's or
der.
The new system of rates is not only
a simplification of existing rale struc
tures. and methods, but in tho opin
Ion of rate experts lajs a foundation
for future practice in all rate revis-1
Ions. While the commission has not j
considered the prac.tihility of applies-
tin d the block system to the mak
ing of fr-it rates, it is known that
the quest iou may be taken up almost
any time.
EI.IMIX ATE MYSTERY.
With standard freight rates once es
tablished, between blocks instead of
between points mid all other rates
in percentages instead of the standard.
the mystery of the present complicated
system of freight rates, in tho opin
ion of the commission's experts, -would
be solved. The basis of classification
prescribed by Ihe commission is that
all merchandize of ordinary value is to
be carried as first class or at ordinary
merchandize rates.
1111)1) SKOOM) I. ASS.
Articles of food, drink, with a few
exceptions, are second class and will
be carried at 75 per cent of the first
class rates. Kates for newspapers as
well as for bread and such articles
for which specially low rates are now
charged, are subetaptially the same
as the present rates.
Permanent committees have been
appointed to revise the route of ex
press carriers to eliminate routes
"una now cause consicierauio com
plaint on the nart of shtDDers.
inwn.11.-a on in n-r u iv
Th. ' h. A eioH
statements Indicating the losses of
revenue under the proposed rates
would be Intolerable and argued siren-, "'"- " u"UJU'ttuur"' materials,
uouslv that the establishment of the expo1rts manufactures and agricul
parcels post bad deprived them or I iural Prducts. movements of manu
quite 30 per cent of the revenue for-j faclurer9 materials within the United
merlv received from parcels of n States activities of transporting agen
pounds or less. The commission's con- cleB and the 8uPP1r distribution of
cluf Ion is the establishment of the par. I currency thus far In the fiscal year
eel Dom 1 not insriflcatten for anv I 1913 practically all exceed those of the
higher scale of rates than the one here
thown to be reasonable.
TWO FOR TEST.
"The commission's order is for tw-o
jea-V says the report. "That period
will give opportunity for a test of
thei-e rates under conditions amounting
to s ncrmal average. Respondents are
at liberty at any time to bring forward
1 ew facts as a basis for a petition for
incd'firatlon of this or any other or
der'" The decision was deferred more
than a year and followed an investiga
tion that occupied nearly six years.
Watch Thief Taken.
Harry Hayes was bound over to the
grand jury this afternoon under $C00
brndt on a larceny charge. Hayes
Me!t a watch from Mrs. James
.''rhomer. anl tfien sold the time
1 'ere. Tnp 'heft was reported to the
vchce who traced the thief and placed
I'.im under arrest.
J
Forecast Till 7 p. m. Tomorrow, for
Rock Island, Davenport, Moline
and Vicinity.
Unsettled but generally fair weather
tonight and Tuesday; slightly warm
er tonight; light, variable winds.
Temperature at 7 a. m., 65; highest
yesterday, S8; lowest last night, 62.
Velocity of wind at 7 a. m., 10 miles
per hour.
Precipitation, none.
Relative humidity at 7 p. m., 40; at
7 a. nv, 65.
Stage of water, 4.6; a fall of .1 in
last 48 hours.
J. M. SHERIER, Local Forecaster.
ASTRONOMICAL EVENTS.
Evening stars: Mercury, Jupiter.
Morning stars: Saturn, Venus, Mara.
Planet Mercury In Inferior conjunction
with the sun 12 m.
GATHERS FORGES
FOR A HARD FIGHT
Western Federation of Miners
Plans Stand in Michigan
Copper Country.
LEADERS ON THE SCENE
Union Officers Denounce Recklessness
of Deputies Guarding the
Mine Properties.
Washington, Aug. 4. Walter Palmer
of the department of labor has been
uetanea to investigate the copper
strike situation in Michigan. He leaves
for Calumet tonight to learn if the de
partment may be of service in effect
ing a settlement.
Calumet, Mich., Aug. i. Practically
the entire strike zone in. the copper
country echoed to rifle and revolver
sncts tnis morning. Tber were more
than the r.fual number of "shadow
shots" by sentries and an increased
patrol rorce or armea deputies was
blamed by troop commanders and
uti'on officials alike, for the almost
constant popping of revolvers that
lasted from shortly after midnight
until daylight. Despite the promiscu
ous firing, no or.e was hit. The rumor
that a man was shot near the Red
Jacket proved false.
DEd.AHEI) AY OITRAGE.
"ine work or mnffFpuues is an
outrage", said President Tavlor, of
the Michigan Federation of Labor."
It is Inconceivable that a grea: state
rhould allow the national guard to be
used as a curtain behind which armed
thugs, authorized through a blanket
commission, may -commit acts that by
right ought to land them in prison.
Taylor said the American Feder-
at ion of Labor and every affiliated
union in the country is behind the
strike and that the fight will take on
national proportions. He intimated he
wxi:'d ko to Lansing in person to tell
the governor of conditions.
11. A DETER M I Kll ST11I
With the arrival today of Mr. and
Mrs. Joe Cannon of lxs Angeles, who
came from the scenes of the strike
in New York and New Jersey, "Mother
Jones," who is due here tomorrow,
and other unionists w-ho are en route,
there is every indication the western
federation is rallving its forces for one
cf the most determined struggles In
union labor history. The first attempt
at resumption of actual mining oc
curred in "E ' shaft at the Champion
mine, in the south range. It was a
fiat failure. Onfy a pumpman report
ed for work. Union pickets' surround
i d uhs n.an and argaed so strenuous
ly, one of them arrested him.
IS GREAT ACTIVITY
IN ALL INDUSTRIES
Washington. Aug. 4. Further evi
dence that the industrial and commer
cial activities of the United States are
, on the up-grade affected only favor
ably by the tariff prospects and eco-
tnomic plans of the democratic admin
T istration-is presented in a
in a bulletin
JUjlt issued by the department of com
merce. It is stated that the figures on
former high-record year, 1912.
ATTACK NEW YORK
BUT ONLY IN PLAY
Newport, R. I., Aug. 4. Eleven great
gray battleships, the most powerful in
the United States navy, steamed out
of Narragansett bay today, bent on a
theoretical destruction of the fortifi
caticn of Losg Island sound. The pur
pose was to open the way for the ulti
mate occupation of New York city.
Lowering clouds and threatening
weather helped, to conceal the move
ments of
the fleet from the army,
which manned the coast defenses,
About thirteen thousand officers, and
men of tie navy are engaged.
THE WEATHER
NAVAL RASE
FOR BR1TIAN
IN BERMUDA
t
Washington Interested In
Rumor of Move by
England.
HITS MONROE DOCTRINE
Decision of U. S. to Fortify
Panama Canal Held Rea
son for Action.
Washington, Aug. 4. Keen interest
has been aroused in official circles
here by a report reaching ihe state de
partment that Great Britain is con
templating the establishment of a great
naval base in the Bermuda islands.
It is stated authoritatively that the
British government has made inquiry
concerning plans of the United States
for the protection Qf the Panama
canal routes, and it has been sug
gested that this indicates an intention
to safeguard British shipping through
the isthmus as is done in the Medi
terranean. MAY KM) MOMtOE UOCTRIXE.
Officials realize that me problem
raised is a tremendous one, involving j
as it may the very life of the Monroe
doctrine and making, perhaps, a com
plete revolution in foreign naval pol
icy in the western hemisphere. For
it is expected that Jf Great Britain,
changes its naval policy in American
Atlantic waters other European na
tions probably will follow suit.
While these changes may be ex
pected in the Atlantic waters and the
West Indies, officials likewise realize
that, with the opening of the canal, the
United States must contend with
Japan for the domination of the Pa
cific. U
STATIONS ABAXDOYEO.
The British royal navy abandoned
its naval stations in this country about
10 years ago, when the United Sta'-esj
gaye up the idea of the construction of
the ' Nicaraguan canal and set about
digging the big water way across
Panama, whose approaching comple
tion bids fair to revolutionize interna
tional relations. '
Apart from Its We6t Indian stations,
the royal navy maintained stations at
Ksquimault, British Columbia, and
Halifax, Nova Scotia. There once
was a plan to strengthen greatly the
fortifications at Esquimault overlook
ing the Strait of Juan De Fuca in order
to make that important base, but both
of these stations now have a merely
nominal existence under the govern
ment of Canada and are little more
than recruiting stations for the royal
navy.
ST. LltTA A MEMORY.
British troops were withdrawn from
St. Lucia, in the West Indies, in 1906;
the guns were dismcun'ed from the
fortifications and what once was a
great military station became only a
commercial coa'.ing place and is not
today even a saluting port.
The three light-draft cruisers, the
Aeolus, Milpomene and , the Sirlus,
flying the British colors, now base at
Kingston, Jamaica. They are insig
nificant, as war vessels, corresponding
to such American cruisers as the New
Orleans and Albany.
WEST IS NOT IN
FEAR OF TARIFF
Senator Myers Cites Wool as
Example Showing the Ef
fects of Protection.
Washington, Aug. 4. Senator My
ers, democrat from Montana, told the
senate today the west did not fear the
tariff bill.
"Amidst the hue and cry about tho
discrimination of this bill against the
west, I wish to have heard cne west
ern 6tate which feels reliant and is
liot complaining about discrimination.
This discrimination against home in
terests when translated Into English
in my opinion often means 'we are
not getting our share of graft, and we
are being overlooked in the distribu
tion of plunder.' "
The woo', growing business, he said,
after nearly a hundred years of pro
tection, coddling and nursing, is a
decadent business.
KING GEORGE WINS
CUP IN BRITTANNIA
Cowes, Isle of Wight. Aug. 4. King
George on board his veterancutter
Brlttannia at Cowes regatta today
, won the Santanita handicap for cut
ters. The Britannia, wh'eh has not
raced at Cowes for nearly
j years, waa scratch boat.
fifteen
SUFS BUTT IN ON
CHURCH SERVICE
Interrupt the Singing of Litany
to Chant Plea for Em
meline Pankhurst.
AT ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL
Forty Ejected by Ushers, Some Refus
ing to GoWithout .a- .
' -V
London, Aug. 4.y-A party of 40 well
dressed euffragets interrupted the
morning service at St. Paul's cathe
dral yesterday by chanting a prayer in
behalf of Mrs. Emmeline Pankhurst.
Ushers ejected the women from the
edifice after a scuffle, in which sev
eral chairs were upset.
The disturbance took place during
the 6ingihg of the litany. The women,
who had front seats in the center
aisle, chanted loudly:
Save Emmeline Pankhurst.
Spare her, spare her.
Give her light and set her free.,
Save her, save her.
Hear us while we pray to Thee.
PROTEST OF 6 AVAIL.
Evidently the chant had been re
hearsed. 'Jt was in the same tune the
choir had' been singing. When the
women began their chant ushers rush
ed toward them from all parts of the
cathedral, while numerous members
of the congregation remonstrated with
the disturbers, telling them to remem
ber that they were in church,
i The 6ufragets, however, repeated
their chant three or four times, each
time in a louder key. A majority of
them finally were led out quietly by
the ushers, but a half dozen or so
clung to their chairs and fought
cgainst ejection. When all the dis
turbers were removed from the build
ing the services proceeded.
POLICE C1.I.E OUT.
A squad of police was in attendance
at vespers, but there was no disturb
ance. A BUSY DAY WHEN
MULHALL CALLED
Senator Townsend Denies Giv
ing Lobbyist Time for a
Confidential Chat.
Washington, D. C, Aug. 4. Senator
Townsend of Michigan was the first
witness before the -senate lobby com
mittee today. The testimony of Mar
tin M. Mulhall had been finished and
that witness was waiting to be ques
tioned by the house lobby committee.
Townsend flatly denied Mulhall's testi
mony that he had talked with him
and characterise 1 Mulhall as "a self
acknowledged corruptionist." Emery
and Mulhall, when Townsend was a
member of the house, came together
In his office, and Mulhall made an
argument about labor legislation.
"When he paused I asked him if
he was through and when he said
jyes I said: 'Well, this is my busy
J day. You will have to excuse me.'
i Therefore, it Is an unqualified false
hood, when he says he talked to me
ronfidentiallv."
" "This man was personally offensive
! to me," concluded the senator, "there-
STILL SETTIN'
fore I could not fail to remember if
he had talked to me confidentially."
Former Congressman Watson of In
diana in a letter to the committee
charged the democrats of the commit
tee had prejudged the case made out
by Mulhall against the manufacturers
without a hearing. Watson declined
to appear, saying, "I prefer to take my
case to another court."
Chairman Overman announced for
mer Senator Foraker would be heard
tomorrow.
Watson has written the house com
mittee for an appearance and prob
ably will testify after Mulhall's exami
nation. MINE DEATHS AT
T0WERCITY,PA.,19
Double Explosion Catches Men
Working Over Area of
Quarter of a Mile.
Pottsville, Pa., Aug. 4. Harry
Schoffstall, the only survivor of the
explosion at the East Brookside col
iiery, which resulted in the death of
19 persons, is in a dying condition at
his home In Orwin, today. Of the 10
Americans killed nine leave widows,
and an aggregate of 51 children.
Tower City, Pa., Aus- 4. The num
ber of dead as a result of the double
explosion at the East Brookside col
liery of the Philadelphia and Reading
Coal and Iron Company Saturday was
increased to nineteen yesterday by the
death at Pottsville -of John Lorenz,
mine superintendent. Daniel Farley
.and John Fesgler, fire bosses, are still
in tjie working in 6pite of all
efforts which have been made to res
cue them.
It is now almost certain that they
are buried under a big fall of rock,
which occurred inn the vicinity of the
tunnel where the first explosion oc
curred. Thirteen men died in the first ex
plosion and six went to their death in
the second blast after a heroic attempt
to rescue the first victims. One cf the
rescuers escaped.
It is not known exactly what caused
the explosions but the miners at the
colliery are inclined to believe Jhat
the first explosion was that of dyna
mite and the second was caused by
gas which had been liberated by the
dynamite explosion. It is also sug
gested that the first explosion was
caused by gas. The dead were scat
tered about for a distance of about a
quarter of a mile. Only three men
were taken out alive and two of these
died.
Twenty-Two Die in Scotland.
Glasgow, Scotland. Aug. 4. Twen:
ty-two coal miners perished in a fire
last night at the Mavis valley pit,
Cadder colliery, near here. A widow
lost three sons.
ATTEMPT ON LIFE OF
AN OMAHA DETECTIVE
Omaha. Aug. 4. An attempt to as
sassinate Chief of Detectives Stephen
Malcney was made earl ytoday when
some unknown person fired two bul
lets at him as he sat in his office at
the police station, which Is atwut a
hundred feet from a switching track
cn which several box cars were stand
ing. There were no arrests. Moloney
gave the matter little attention, re
It was probably some fan
marking:
atia." '
NEWYORKERSARE
IN AUTO FATUITY
s.
Osgood Pell and Banker
Laimbeer Dead as a Re
sult of Accident.
CAR STRUCK BY A TRAIN
William K. Vanderbllt In Party It Is
Claimed No Signal Was Glv
en at Crossing.
Hempstead, 12 I., Aug. 4. William
Laimbeer, the banker who was injured
in an automobile accident last night
near here, In which S. Osgood Pell,
the millionaire real estate dealer, and
his chauffeur, Charles Gambean, were
killed, was barely alive in the hos
pit il today. There are slight chances
for recovery. Mrs. Laimbeer's con
dition is critical, but she has a chance
for life. Her skull is fractured.
COROEK AT WORK.
The coroner today began an investi
gation to determine whether the Long
Island train which struck the Pell car
whistled or otherwise signaled as it
neared the crossing. Witnesses tay
no flagman was on the spot.
William K. Vanderbilt, who was one
of the party, but in a car ahead, said:
"There were several cars between
that which I wa3 driving and Pell's
car. I don't recall whether I heard a
whistle or not. I do know I had no
idea a train was approaching."
Mrs. Laimbeer was Miss N. Schenck
before her marriage and a famous
beauty of Newport and New York.
FKACTl RE OF SKI I.I. FATAL.
Laimbeer died this morning. Frac
ture of the skull was the cause. It is
believed Mrs. Laimbeer will recover.
Laimbeer's fir6t wife was Clara Blood
good, the actress.
CHAIR ENDS SLAYER'S LIFE
Anthony Grace Executed at Sing Sing
for Brother's Murder.
Ossining, N. Y., Aug. 4. Anthony
Grace was put to death in the elec
tric chair at Sing Sing today for the
murder of his brother, "Jack," the well
known wrestler, whose body was found
hacked to pieces in the rooms of a
social club in Walden, N. Y., last Sep
tember. Anthony disappeared at the
time of the tragedy, after having sud
denly married the widow at Walden.
When arrested, he had much personal
property In his possession pertaining
to his dead brother.
BRADY WILL GIVES
$70,000,000 AWAY
New York, Aug. 4. The will of An
thony E. Brady, traction magnate,
leaves five children and a grandchild
the bulk of an estate valued at $70,
000,000. The widow receives $1,000,000
outright and annually $60,000. One
hundred thousand goes to charity.
Cured of Broken Neck.
St. Joseph, Mo., Aug. 4. Glen Len
her, 17 years old, of Humboldt, Neb.,
was discharged from a local hospital
as cured of a broken neck. July 9 a j sand salmon fishers, white, Japanese
swing turned over and dropped him land Indians, have gone on a strike on.
upon his head. For three weekc his'Fraser river. Only Greek fishermen.
- 'neck and shoulders have beea encased
in plaster ca&l
WILSON OUT
OF MEXICAN
IMBROGLIO
Resignation of Ambassa
dor Announced After a
A
Visit to Bryan.
SHOWS TAFT LETTwH
President Hopes for Peaceable
Solution of Trouble by
Southern Neighobr. , "
Washington, D. C., Aug. 4. Secre
tary Bryan today announced the ac
ceptance of the resignation of Ambas
sador Wilson of Mexico.
Bryan made this statement: "Am
bassador Wilson's resignation was ao
cepted to take effect Oct. 14. The
part w hich he lelt it his d lty to take
in the earlier stages of the recent
reolution in Mexico, would make it
difficult for him to represent the views '
of tie administration in view of the
situation which now exists."
HAS 0 IIWS l.KAVE,
The ambassador, in ordinary prac
tice, is entitled to 60 days leave ol
absence exclusive of jSunday's which
accounts for the fixing of the date on
Oct. 14. In the meantime no appoint
ment can be made to fill the vacancy.
Consequently the American embassy
in Mexico will remain in charge of
Secretary O'Shaughnessy.
AMRASSAIJOIl PAYS OMPI.1MEXT.
In a statement the ambassador said:
"I believe the president and secretary
in their consideration of the question
are actuated by the highest patriotism
and justice to both countries."
XO A II M EH IXTEHVEXTIOX.
Washington, Aug. 4. Armed Inter
vention in Mexico is neither a prob
ability nor a possimuty, lor a peace
able solution of the situation Is becom
ing more practicable. This Is the view
President Wilson took today of the
situation. He let it be known
that before long he would make a
brief announcement of the first step in
the policy of the United States toward
Mexico.
MAY DEAL WITH IltERTA.
While there is no inkling of what It
may be, it came from the White house
that it was expected the president would
formally announce his decision not to .
recognize the Huerta government. The
sudden call of Ambassador Wilson to
Washington led to the report his status
might be announced.
. IS A MIsrXDERSTAXniX'O.
The ambassador came to the White
house and was told there was a mis
understanding about his engagement,
that instead of a conference with the
president he was to call on Secretary
Bryan. The ambassador said the tele
gram received in New York stated the
conference was to take place at the
White house. Observers of the diplo
matic situation predicted the ambas
sador's resignation' would be accepted
soon.
The only explanation, however, as
to the. purpose of his recall to Wash
ington made at the White house, was
that it was for further consultation.
SAYS TAFT APPHOVEIJ.
On the way from the White house
to the state department, the ambassa
dor gave out a copy of a letter from
President Taft. June 29, 1911,, approv
ing his course in Mexico.
ALLEI TO WAKIIIXGTOV.
Washington, D. C, Aug. 4. Ambas
sador Wilson returned to Washington
today for a conference with Secretary
Bryan. The ambassador's return evi
dently was arranged on short notice.
His telegram from Mr. Bryan merely
said he wanted to confer on "import
ant matters." Mr. Wilson disclaimed
knowing for what he was summoned.
CANT IMPERSONATE
MEMBER OF CONGRESS
Will Be Crime When Bill Now
Before the Senate Be
comes a Law. lrJi
Washington, Aug. 4. Early action
by congress to provide punishment for
those who impersonate members of
congress or public officers, "by tele
phone, telegraph, mail or otherwise,"
was promised in the senate today,
when Cummings presented a favorable
report from the judiciary committee
on a bill he recently introduced. It
carries heavy fines and Imprisonment
as penalties. '
SALMON FISHERS OUT;
CATCH THROWN BACK
Vancouver, B. C, Aug. 4. Four thou-
, remain, and their-catch was throwJ
vwtoard fay Japanese f ick4. - 1

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