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Rock Island daily Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1886-1893, February 02, 1892, Image 2

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THE AUG US, TUESDAY. FE13RUAU V 2,1892.
THElAItGUS.
blUhd Daily and Weekly at 1624 Second
Avenge, Rock Taland. 111. '
J. W. Potter,
Publisher.
Tmis Daily, 60c ptr month; Weekly, $3.00
per annum.
AH eemmanicationt of a critical or argumenta
tlre character, lolitical or religious. nt bare
real tame attached for publication. No such
mx i(v mrn win uc pnniei oyer nciiuuuv bikuwuic
Anonvir.ona eommnnteatloes not noticed.
Correspondence solicited from every township
in kocK Island eoantv.
Tuesday, February 2, 1892.
Peoria wants the democratic state
convention. Feoria knows a good thing
when she sees it, and we don't blame her
for wanting to capture the prize. She
hashed the honor of entertaining the
convention before, and acquitted herself
proudly, and we know of no reason why
her claims should not be c&icfully con
idered by the state central committee
A New York newspaper correspondent
has made an estimate of the condition of
those who have passed out of this vale of
tears and reports the number of souls in
hell at 159,000,000.000, against a palt y
' 18,OCO,000,000 duly saved and cccupyiog
the mansions of the blessed. Tbis esti
mate may be fairly accurate if New York
City be taken as the basis of comparative
morality, but Indiana gives promise of
better things. We can furnish for the
. reinforcement of the "very elect" not
only all of the truly moral republicans,
bat also quite a sprinkling of democrats.
mugwumps and prohibitionists. If it
would not occasion too much trouble e
would ask for a recount.
A strange and altogether startling
piece of news ccmes from Boston. And
furthermore, the report, which is import
ant if true, savors of something that is
nearly akin te the scandalous. It coo
cerns not the lower classes of the hub
' city nor the masculine portion of its pop
ulation, but its most aristocratic ladies.
The statement is made that the deplor
able exhibition of high kicking known as
the skirt dance has become a favorite fad
in back-bay drawing-rooms of late, and
Afternoon teas "for ladies only" have been
enlivened by the spirited "kangaroo
kick," with varations of divers ballet
performances. Groups of young ladies,
who are the acknowledged leaders of
- Boston '8 best society, attire themselves
in garments warranted to hide no grace
ful movements of their lithe bedies and
well-formed limbs, and give exhibitions
of Delsartean pose, and something of a
livelier nature before audiences of society
bud and staid matrons. Ob, home of
Joseph Cock.' the only town on earth
that excludes all tumorous papers from
its public library I how could your
women do these things and not expect
to be caught at it? We Know now why
you keep "The Clcmenccau Ca9t" and
other evil, undress affairs from your city;
you are trying to encourage a home in
dustry by shutting out foreign compe
tition. Xow For Home nle.
The New York Press says it was the
only organ in that city that several weeks
previous to the extremely important elec
tions of Water ford and Rossendale placid
in the hands of its readers reliable infor
mation ss to the positions and prospects
of success of the parties engaged. The
result in each case proved how accurate
was the information fnrnisbedits readers.
Rossendale has been captured by the
Gladstone heme rulers, ably assisted by
some Irish national members cf parlia
ment, and not since Mr. Gladstone intro
duced the home rule bill in 18S6 was
there a more distinctly English pro
nouncement on the question. The Irish
vote in Rossendale was of small account.
so that this great victory, which places
Irish home rule firmly in the foreground
of English politics, was unquestionably
won by English votes, and is a true ex
pression of English opinion tbereoD. It
augers well for the final success of the
Irish cause.
But that which is to follow, and follow
soon, will be immensely more important
that is, a general election, as by it will be
settled forever the long vexed question.
No other -course is open to an honorable
administration. Rossendale has given
Botice to the conservative ministry, of
which the Marquis of Salisbury is the
bead, that its conduct of affairs in general
end as regards home rale Sn particular, is
not in harmony with the people's ideas.
Therefore, if political events follow in
regular order we must logically conclude
that a dissolution of the ministry will soon
occur, and the people of the United King
dom be afforded an oppcrtunity to rote
home rule for Ireland and send William
. Glandsone into office to complete the
great work to which he has devoted the
ast years of bis political life. Bad the
.. government been successful in Rossen
dale they could point to it and say with
some show of reason, indeed, that they
held the confidence of the nation; but the
result proves the contrary, &id there is
nothing left for them but dissolution, and
that on a day in the near future. Sooner
than many imagine there will be a great
political struggle in the United Kingdom,
and the standard around which the battle
will fiercely rage will bear the words
"Home Rule."
SPECTRAL PIRATES.
SCENES ' OF MORE THAN ' FIFTY
Vr.ARS AO RE-ENACTED.
Kills Island, the Government Immi
grant Landing, Is SaUl tu lit tlauntetl
by the Ghosts of Former Criminals of
the Se i Who Were Hanged There.
Kllis island is haunted. There is no
doubt aliout it, for the watchmen who
guard Uicle Sam's immigrant station on
the historic little island say they have seen
sights g ven to few mortals to see, and
have hei.rd moans ami cries and Khouts
which never came from lips of man. More
than thi, one man there knows what it is
to incurt hedi.spleasureof the disembodied.
He was rowling around the ghost well at
the forb dden hour when a heavy spade
wielded by ghostly arms descended on his
head and knock! him senseless. A great
bruise on the back of his head is still there
to confound the incredulous.
At midnight shadowy forms, clad in long
capes and three cornered hats, walk abroad,
ami, arm in arm, make the circuit of the
island. The ghosts are said to lie those of
the pirat ?s hanged years ago on the "pi
rates' tre;" in the shadow of the ancient
governor a house. This house is still stand
ing. It t as delied the ravages of lime, and
its oaker. beams and white ash shingles
are as so ind as they were the day . they
were taken to the island by the villagers
of "Xeu Yorke," who turned out in force
to erect t ie building.
Southeast of the old bouse stands the
pirates' tree." In summer its leaves rus
tle again.' t the shingled side of the house,
and in winter the branches of one gaunt
limb the very one upon which the pirates
were ha lged beats a mournful tattoo
against the low eaves as if sounding the
"long roli" for the souls of the departed
buecaneei-s.
STRANT.E SOCXDS.
A few f t from the tree is an artesian
well. It was sunk at the expense of the
government, but no water was found, and
after bor ng nearly a thousand feet the
project and well were abandoned. Nothing
but a deep, black hole, four feet in diame
ter and eighty feet deep, now remains to
mark the spot. Four men lost their lives
in that well by being caught in quicksand,
and their bodies were never recovered. The
branches of the pirates' tree extend over
the mouth of the well, and the ghosts of
the pirates make it their headquarters at
midnight, and at that time it is said the
branches of the tree are mightily agitated
and blow upward, as if a great draft is
sued from the depth. of the big hole.
Despite the most searching investigation
the residents on the island cannot account
for the strange sounds and sights in an?
other way than that ghosts are abroad.
A feeling of terror has seized upon the
government employees who are forced to
remain nij;ht after night on the island. At
times when the spirits become unusually
festive, dojrs known to have been securely
locked were violently slammed, and win
dows knovn to have been fastem 1 were
raised and lowered.
Lights have been mvsteriouslv ex
tinguished, and mighty gusts of wind have
come down the chimneys. This latter
strange proceeding is said to be due to t he
fact that the more venturesome ghosts
take speciid delight in rushing down the
chimneys.
After tie ferryboat J. H. BrinckerhotT
makes its last trip the island becomes a
lonely spot indeed. Business ceases, and
as the set ing sun's rays become dimmer
and dimmer and the shades of night en
velop the l.ttle isle, a feeling of desolation
pervades t le place.
;riusTi.v p.fccANKrns.
Those on the island say that just before
midnight the wraiths begin to appear, and
they are oi t in lull force when the clock in
Trinity tover begins to toll 12. Sepulchral
tones are h -ard issuing from the direction
of the well. Suddenly a dozen shadowy
forms dreed in lung capes, high top Ijuots
and three cornered hats leap up from the
darkness of the well and dance frantically
about the i dge. Theu the branches of the
"pirates' tree" shake violently, the tree
rocks fron side to side and groaning is
heard.
The spirits of two buccaneers are seen
bent over t'ie ground beneath the tree go
ing throng i the motions of digging. At
times the hanging of the pirates is re
hearsed. Two of their number are drag
ged forth from the shadows of the old
gunner's hmisc and hanged from the fatal
branch. Vhen the moon shines brightly
the ghosts seldom venture from the black
pit.
On Wedn salay night Watchman Sprague
was missed anil it was thought he hail
fallen into the ghosts' well. The watch
men and Tieasnrer Manning armed them
selves and sallied forth to find the belated
watchman. They came across him lying
near the doctor's quarters, partially
stunned. When he recovered he said he
heard noises that froze his blood, and lie
fore he could run he was felled by a spade,
which lay near where he had fallen.
Sprague's head was swollen, but it wax not
cut. While they were leading Sprague
away Treasurer Manning saw something
uncanny an I yelled, "U hosts." There was
a stampede and poor Sprague was left
Straggling behind. He hid himself in a
trunk unci remained there until morning.
IIISTOKY OF TUK ISLAND.
The very next night Watchman Jahn
and twoof his assistants set out to unravel
the mystery. They lay in wait near the
well until midnight. At that hour they
were almot-t pet ri tied when they saw the
forms of t.vo men clad in the costumes
pirates affect hanging by the neck from
the pirate's tree. When they recovered
from their fright the brave watchmen
scurried for their quarters as fast as thuir
legs eould Garry 1 hem, aud have uot ven
tured out at night since.
One hund -ed years ago Kllis island was
known as Ovster island. . ShorUy after tfie
war of I8l Captain Morgan, au old sea
dog, turned pirate aud committed many
outrages in the bay ami on the coast. lie
was cupturnl after a lierce struggle, and.
with four of his piratical crew, was hanged
to the pirate's tree.
Nearly forty yeurs later the notorious
buccaneer, Captain Giblis, whose deeds of
lawlessness stirred up the entire commu
nity, was hi nged on the same tree, in the
presence of l.UOO people. New York Ad
vertiser. A Tribute to a Fad.
First Bur-filar (outside) Hello, pard!
Wot'slhe matter?
Second Burglar (picking hfmsel out the
debris ut tot t of stairs) Kf I'd a-knowed
that this heie was the home of one of t hem
female txmncers wot has graduated in
physical culahcr, I'd a-staid away. She
met me at the head of the stairs and
th rowed me clear throui the front door.
PittsburK Balletin.
A short, stout man in long failed frock
is an incongiuity. It is well not to lie fash
ionable if on ; is to hazard being laughed at
for one's paii is.
i I 'The Castled Rhine" Today.
TL whole course of what used to be
railed th castled Rhine now looks like the
lower Thames and smells like Shoreditcji
or Bermondsey. We see a panoramic de
velopment of all the more offensive trades
and guilds of the Middle Ages. Formerly
the Rhenish industries Were mainly con
centrated in the flourishing principality of
Wied, colonized originally by the hard
working . Moravians, or they had been car
ried on from time immemorial in primitive
fashion, as in the manufacture of the mill
stones at Xieder-Mendig. Now the steamer
carries you through volumes of smoke, be
tween a double line of cloth mills, chemical
works, lime kilns and brick fields ot
everything, in fact, that is lucrative, un
wholesome and prosaic.
Nor does theevilend there. Thespirited
proprietors of these enterprises have been
rapidly growing rich and have been hous
ing themselves as befits their rising for
tunes. They have been transmogrifying
and adding to venerable castles; they have
been running up sumptuous mansions ot
the florid composite order in the suburbs ol
the cities, and one of the most audacious ot
the nouveaux riches has actually seated
himself on the summit of the castled crag
of the Drachenfels.
After that sort of thing it would be iu
hypereritical as idle to protest against the
government cutting up the country for the
exigencies of national defense. Indeed,
the circles of detached forts around May
ence and Coblenz blend rather happily with
the broken ground, and the glacis in the
sequestered jioplar groves on the enceinte
of Cologne give character and color to an
otherwise tame and monotonous land
scape. Loudon Saturday Review.
Nile Mud.
There is nothing to make one realize the
importance of mud indeed, like a journey
up the Nile when the inundation is just
over. You lounge on the deck of youi
dahabieh and drink in geography almost
without knowing it. The voyage forms a
perfect introduction to the study of mud
ology, and suggests to the observant mind
(meaning you and me) the real nature of
mud as nothing else on earth that I know
of can suggest it; for in Egypt ?oxl get
your phenomenon isolated, as it were, from
all disturbing elements.
You have no rainfall to bother you, nu
local streams, no complex denudation; the
Nile does it all, and the Nile does every
thing. On either hand stretches away the
bare desert, rising up in gray, rocky hills.
Down the midst runs the one long line ot
alluvial soil in other words, Nile mud
which alone allows cultivation and life in
that rainless district. The country bases
itself absolutely on mud. The crops are
raised on it, the houses and villages are
built of it, t he land is manured with it, the
very air is full of it. The crude brick
buildings that dissolve in dust are Nile
mud solidified, the red pottery of Assiout
is Nile mud baked hard, the village
mosques and minarets are Nile mud white
washed. I have even seen a ship's bulwarks
neatly repaired with mud. It pervades the
whole land, when wet, as mud undisguised;
when dry, as dust storm. Coinhill Maga
zine. A Retting Captain.
The captain of one rather old and slow
steamer, rinding that he would have to be
a long time in China liefnre he received a
full cargo of tea, and would have probably
to return in ballast, began, to every one's
astonishment, to say thnt, owing to the
repairs that hail been done to his enirines.
he hoped to make a racing passage. Then
still more to the astonishment of the rap
tains of the fast steamers and the world at
large, he commenced to back himself to
make the fastest passage home.
In such very considerable sums of money
did he wager that people began to think
there was something in it, anil the mer
chants sent their tea almost entirely to his
ship, arguing that, as the captain stood to
lose i.iiK), the repairs to his steamer s en
gincs hail probably put him in a position
to bet almost on a certainty.
Of course the steamer, whose greatest
speed was eight knots an hour, arrived in
Knglaud weeks after the others, and the
captain lost his 500; but instead of having
to lie in China waiting his chance of cargo
coming in from the interior a probable de
lay of weeks he had cleared in a few days,
after his liets became known to the public.
with a full ship, thus recouping to his
owners, who of course paid Ins betting
losses, a considerable number of thousands
of pounds profit. Blackwood's Magazine,
How MetalH Are lsoil by Nature.
Nature uses largely four gases oxygen
nitrogen, hydrogen, chlorine. She uses
ulso largely two inorganic nonmetallic bod
ies carbon and sulphur. She uses metals
calcium and iron. She uses one metalloid
phosphorus. Man in his work uses all
these elements with some others. Nature
uses iron sparingly; man uses it largely.
Nature uses the metal calcium largelv.
letting it enter into the construction of the
bone of every skeleton of animal; man uses
calcium in a rough way in the formation
of buildings in the compound form of
lime, together with other metals in the
grand storehouse tin, copper and alumini
um, substances which ' nature siiows no
preference for in any of her artistic and
mechanical works. Man also uses zinc.
lead and mercury, for which nature has no
special employment that is obvious to us.
Longman s Magazine.
Hundreds uf Varieties of Wheat.
Ancient monuments show that the culti
vation of wheat had been established iu
Kgvpt before the invasion of the shepherds.
There are numerous varieties of this use
ful grain. Colonel Le Cauteur, of the Isle
of Jersey, cultivated l.'iO varieties on his
estates at one time, aud Darwin mentions
a French experimenter who had dis
tinct sorts growing at onetime. Vilmorin
Andrieux et Cie. seed merchants of l'aris,
have collected upward of TOO diflereut
types of wheat, or more titan twice as
many as the great Jersey experimenter.
Three small grained varietiesof common
wheat were cultivated by the lirst lake
dwellers of Switzerland. St. Louis Re
public One's Kelutives.
In u Hudson river waiting room one day
a bit of conversation between two women
floated to outside ears: "I'm going up to
Yermont to a family dinner." "Are you?
You'll have a lovely time." "Well, I don't
know," cautiously; "family dinners are
something of a lottery. One's relatives
understand so well bow to tread on one's
corns, you know" which wa not without
a coMsi!-L'.-ib!e grain of truth. New York
Times.
Steel Wire Ilnpu.
Steel wire rojx-s should lie of crucible
Hteel, having a breaking strength of seven
ty to seventy-nix tons per square inch.
Large pulleys are more necessary for wire
than for hemp ropes, thesmallest diameter
permissible being l,30to 1,400 times the
diameter of the wire in the rope, if of iron,
and 2,000 times if of steel. For mining pur
poses wire ropes are liest made with h
hemp core, beingmore flexible. Invention
D
Men s cork sole shoes, all grades.
Misses solid school shoes, heel and sprina
Quids' "
Women's heavy shoes, Peb. Goat and Grain.
We will sell this week only a
dongola shoe-$l,
A ladies' fine dongola house
THE
20 PER CENT DISCOUNT SALE.
1623 Second Ave., - - Rock Island.
Js?siL533s
S way Depot corner Fifth avenue and Tnirty-
TRAINS. ItLSAVB. tARRlVK.
DavExprefs.f T'
Kansas City Day Express... 5:50 am 11:16 pm
Washington Express 8 :98 pm . 1 :05 pm
Coancii r lnffs 4 Mmneeo- r :50 pm ! 7 5 am
ta :ess I r i
Council BluCs A Denver I ,9 o.-a.m
Limited Vestibule Ex.. f &n. a.dsam
hansa City Limited j10:S5 pmi 4:54 am
Atlantic Accommodation 1 8-30 ami 8:15 pm
HjolnK west. jQoing eaet. 'Daily.
BTJELINGTON ROUIE-C, B. i. RAIL
way Depot Firft avenue and sixuenth St.,
M.J. Yonng, agent.
TRAINS. i Lm unnrva
StTiiOoi Bspresa. , :0 an 8:0 am
St. Louis Express i 1 Si pm 7 :18 ptn
St. Faol Express 6 :45 pn. 8 OS am
Beardstown Paseeceei 2:f5pm 10:35 am
Way Frelcht (Monmouth)...! 8.03 m l:f0pm
Stirling Fasfecper j 7:13 am :48 pm
Savanna " l0:S5am 8:4spm
Dhily.
CHICAGO, MILWACKKK ST. PAVL RA1L
w&r Racine & Southwestern Division De
pot Twentieth s',recl. between First and Second
avenue, S. D. W. Holmes, agent.
TRAIN'S. LKAva Arritb
Ju&u and Kxpres? 6:45n 9:Wpin
St. Paul Expr. ss S:15vm 11:25 am
t.A Accommodation W;n 10:l(im
t. Arcon-motiatior. T:?5g, StlPpm
ROCK INLAND PEORIA RAILWAY DK
pot Firdt avenue and Twentieth street. F.
H. Rochwell. Agent.
TP.AiHS. jj.AV. ABRIVK
Fast Mall Express 8:10 am 7:30 pm
Express 2 : pm l:.Vpn
Cable Accommodation 9:10 am 8:00 pm
" j 4:00nm S:0i am
MOST DIBBCT BOUTS TO THE
East. South and Southeast,
Fust M'l.i
8:10 am
8:51 am
:15am
9 :U am
10 :'A1 am
10:39 am
1:135 am
Exprtss
8:S0im
8 :m i m
3:i"Tpm
8 .57 pm
4 :35 pm
4 :5i pm
5:55 pm
Lt. Rock Island..
Ar. Orion
CamnrdBe ...
G-lva
Wyorainu
Prtrct ville ...
1'eorta
Bloomington..
Springfield...
Jacksonville.
Decatur
Danville
Indianapolis.
Terre llante..
E vans i lie...
St. louis ..
Cincnnai....
Louisville....
.' 1:15 pm
.' S:45 im
.. 4-00 pm
I 9:50 pm
8:50 pro
. ; ft ::Vi pm
' 7:10 im
.' 1:20 am
9:15pm
4-3(1 pm
18-05 n t
10:uopm
13:10 n't
3:15 am
in-on am
! C-S am
. i :ini pm
.10-00 pm
:00 am
:00 am
WEST BOl'ND .
Lv. Peoria
Ar. Rock Island
10:15 ami 4:10pm
l:30pni 7:80 pm
Accommodation trams leave Kwk Is and at
6:00 a. m. ud 6 45 p. m; arrive ot Peoria 8:45 p.
m. and 9:80 a m. 1 eave Penjia :(0 a. m. and
7:15 p. m; arrive Rock Island 4:00 p. m and 2:05
p. m.
All trains rn daily except Snnday.
All passe ger trains arrive and depart Union
defol, Peoria.
Free Ct air car on Fast Express between Bock
Is'ond and Peoria, both directions.
Through tickets 10 all points; baggage checked
iDrsagu w aesiinaiion.
CABLE BHAWCB. '
lActom, Acccrs.
Lt. Bock Island .lom 4.00 pm
Arr. Reynolds.. 10 211 am S.06 pm
Cable 11.00 am 6.40 pm
lAci cm. lAcrom
Lv. Cable 8.20 am 3'0 pra
At. Reynolds I 7.00 arc! 1.45 pm
" itock ls.and 7.55 am' 8.00 pm
H. B. 8UDLOW, H. BTOOKHOTJSlT
nperintiTidneTri
Or Uir I'lqaor ll:..i, loUivel 4 uit d
byautinlnialerinsr Ir. Uaine'
4lsTwn kiNTMr.
It le tnantifttcnre4 m a powder, which con be
;i luia of new. a cup ot corteo or tea, cr m lot
without tlie iCDrow.edrje ofhe patient. It i&abs-'.aic-lj-hirtaiefli,
and will e.lt-et permanent and prrdy
cur?, whether this paient is a moderate ririmtr ur
an alcoholiwveoJc It has been given tn tlicmsntih
ot ca."j, au"J in rvery iDBtance a prft-ct oure bas foi
low?d. it never Kail. Theeyetem ouoe Im prefect,
d wuh the 8pcr.flc.i: beeoms an ULter impoasit;
fnr Honor act)to to exist.
';oi.:js:x &iKrsrf c co ivoie sroiririor.
CINCINNATI. OHIO.
S Taf bvk or ariieu'ir ao. To be tad cf
Fcr eale by UartbaU F.ebr and T. H. Thom
ftp. dramcieta.
THIS WEEK ONLY.
BOSTON
UNACQUAINTED WITH THE GEOGRAPHY 0FTHIS COUNTRY YVXt
VUCrt VALUABLE INFORMATION FROM A STUDY OF TH'.S DAP
MTH
OF THE
CMcaio, Ml Islasi & Pacific Bj,
The Pirert Route to and from Chicago, Jollet, Ottawa,
Peoria, La Salle. l..line, Koci Island, in ILLINOIS;
Davenport, Mucat:n, Ottumwa. ikaloosa, Des
Moines, Wintered, Audubon, Harlsn and Conncll
Hull In IoV A ; Minneapolis aud St. Puul, in MIN
NESOTA; Vatertonn and Sioux Falls, in DAKOTA;
Cameron, St. Joseph and Kansas City, in MISSOURI;
Omaha, Lincoln, Fairbury and Nelson, in NEBRASKA;
Atchison, Leavenworth, Horton, Toiwka, Hutchinson.
Wichita, Beilevllle, Abilene, Poilue City, CaMtrell, in
KANSAS; Kinpfuher, F.l T.eno and Minco, in INDIAN
TF.ERITORY: Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo,
in COLORADO. Traverses new areas or rich farming
and grazing lands, affording the best facilities of Inter
communication to all towns and cities east and west,
northwest and southwest of Chicago and to Tacific and
trans-oceanic seaports.
MAGNIFICENT
VESTIBULE EXPRESS TRAINS
Leading all competitors In splendor of equipment,
between CHICAGO and DE3 MOINES, COUNCIL
BLUFFS and OMAHA, and between CHICAGO and
DENVER. COLORADO SPRINGS and rUEBLO, via
KANSAS CITY and TOFFKA and via ST. JOSEnt.
First-Class Day Coaches, FREE RECLINING CHAIR
CARS, and I'aiace Sleepers, with Dining Car Service.
Close connections at Iienver and Colorado Springs with
diverging railway liues. now forming the new and
picturesque
STANDARD GAUGE
TRANS-ROCKY MOUNTAIN ROUTS
Over which snperbly-eqnipped trains run dally
THROUGH WITHOUT CHANGE to and from Salt
iJtkeClty, Ogdes ind San F"ncisco. THE ROCK
ISLAND is also the Direct ana Favorite Line to and
fitoi Manitou, Tike's Peak and all other sanitary and
scenic resorts and cities and mining districts in Colorado,
DAILY EAST EXPRESS TRAINS
From St Joseph and Kansas City to and from all im
portant towns, cities and sections in Southern Nebraska.
Kansas and the Indian Territory. Also via ALBERT
LEA ROUTE from Kansas City and Chicago to Water
town, Sioux Falls, MINNEAPOLIS and ST. PAUL,
connection? for all points north and northwest between
the lakes and the Pacific Coast.
For Tickets, Maps, Folders, or desired Information
apply to any Coupon Ticket Office in the United States
or Canada, ox address
E. ST. JOHN, JOHN SEBASTIAN,
Cenl Manager. Gent Tkt. A Pass. AgL,
CHXC&.'O.
AlinluiltfJrinnTiif
E. C. FRAZER.
-A. MsTV
ANTHRACITE. COAL.
rnll
. THEMOIJNE
STATE SAVINGS BANK.
MOLINJS - ILLS.
OIH;e Coraer Fifteenth street and Third Ave.
CAPITAL. $100,000.00.
Succeeds the Moline Savings Back. Ogasixed 18S9
5 PEB CEIT. IMTEKST PAID 01 DBMS.
Organized nnder State Laws,
Open from a. m. to 8 p. to, and Wcdnesdar and
Satnrnay niehts from 7 to 8.
Pobteb Skikwer, - . . President
H. A. Awswobth, - - Vice-President
C.r.HiKKwii. - - . Caenier
DIRECTORS:
Porter BMnner, S. W. Wheelock,
f. A. Hose, H . A. Ainsworth,
G. H. Edwards, w. U. Adams,
Andrew Fnberif. C. F. Iiemenway
Hiram Darlinc,
0(1
-4
ladies' pat. tip
slipper - 50c.
CPESATINS CVM
innnM:i.-.iT.
IOWA,
ivi i ii in Lau I A
AND
SOUTH nflKOTi
Solid Trains
BETWEEN
Chicago, Minneapolis and St. Pi.
Yla the Famous Allien Lw, Kol.
mile tbTinnfiannlic n n H c. 5.
I la su AjOuis, Minneapolis A t. l aui
AND
ti t. r l i ni a.
in iincf ii .irrnr.i n i iiii.-t i tif
BETWEEN
KANSAS CITY. MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. PC
PEORIA. CEDAR F.APIDS A Nil SIO'JX FAiil Ut:
CHICAGO AND CEDAR RAPID:
Via the 1'amous AHwrt L l.1.
THE SHORT LINE
TO
SLSPIR T LAKE T"'
The Great I
ov;i Sui
iiv.-r i?r
For Railway and Ht-1 1
Pamphlets ami all nit"!;:
tlt'iri Ticket ami I'.:"-
FOR CHEAP HOIVitt
n lltia rtf tliic I,. V.m-I.v r- I"
Southeastern Minnesota a'"l tvwnl i--
whtw drought ami crop t:if!!!n- an- :
Thousands of cIiohv a t - "I l.iii Wi
I rut'll l.'VitiKi.tii v-.t.. . , .t 1 . r 1 - 1! .Tr
tion as to prices of ian-i :uil r.it-( tarr.a
Uenl Ticket and Pas- miei- A.-nt.
AU of the Pas-ienizn- Tr.iiioii 'X.n
tins Kailwav are lMMle-1 ! tu:i sr
engine, and the Main Line i.-. I'm-sa i"j-
flre lifrliteri with tli. VU.ptri,-
Mans. Time Tallies. Tlmiith Kate :M i"-
I'limaiioii iiiriii-.Meci on ap " .
Tiekets on sale o-.t tins - i ; T at all M'
points in the I'nion, ami l y ii A.'"iit.
parts of the Tinted Siali c an-i i a;i:. "i
aiFor aiiiioimci-nieiils of K -iim s
and local matters of im-n---. pUay-r.-lrf'. -
local columns oi tliis paper.
C. J. IVES, J. E. HANNEGAV
Vres't 4 Gen'l Supt. iler.'l Tk:11- 1
CEDAR RAPIC8, IOWA
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ELECTRIC BELT
wit cr
IMPROVEQ-
pose, tare ! inrtnr "'kr'
KAtfTS. r.-t.irir iht
Constipation Piles
No DrnR. or Medicine, nf
Koin-onvenlence hn-v'-r i
' A
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en S win cure in.
rucipe to
BOX -V'" BW

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