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Rock Island daily Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1886-1893, March 11, 1892, Image 2

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THE A KG US F1UDAY, M I. Oil 1 I. 1sl
9
THE ARUUS.
Published Daily and Weekly at 1621 Second
Avcnce, Rork ltland. 111.
J. W. Potter. - - Publisher.
Trans Daily, 60e pir month; Weekly, $2.00
per annnm.
Alleommaniration of a crit:ra1 or argumenta
tive character, tolitical or religions, must hue
Teal name attached for pnbli alien. No n;h
nicies win oe prvntei oyer nctifions s'i;naiur
Anonymous eommutiicatio-is not noticed.
Correspondence rollci.ed from every township
n hock island coantv.
Frioat, March 10, 1863.
CALL IOK It KM OC It AT lit KTATK
S.OXVF.XTIOX Of ILLIOI!. -
Headquarters Democratic Slate Central Com
mittee of Illinois. Mn-imn House, Cfiicitfo
February 22, Is'.K!. A Convention of tlie Dem
ocracy of the State ol Illinois, is hereliy called to
meet in inc. iiauot ineinaise or iteprcr ent.'im'ts,
in Sprinclielil, Illinois, on Wednesday April S?th,
ls92, at 2 o'clook v. . forth purpose i f nomi
nating tandiilatos to In- voted for on Tuesday.
November 8th. InW. for the office of Governor;
l.'eutcnant Governor; Secretary of State; Auditor
oi none r ccour.is ; t reiisurcr ; Attorney oener
Ml ; Three Trtis'ces of the University of Illinois;
To Congressmen at La".'?: a'so for the purpose
of selecting one Pres'ilentnl Kl ctor from earn
CongTissUiiiiiI Dhtrict. and four Presidential
Electors from tlie state at la re. Two delegates
from each Congressional Disuwt and eitlit ilcle
rates from llie state at la-ee to" Hie Deinocrattc
National Convention, to be hel.i in Chit-ago. Jun
SI, 1SVJ. One State Committeeman from ach
Congressional District, and aev4 n state Com
mitteercen from the state at innrc, and snoli other
business asmav j roperty reini lttfore the con
vention. "Ihe basis of representation for e.trh
county snail nc: ur.e crMjjatc lor eacn lonr
hundred votes cast for CU m land and Tburman a!
the last t Preside! t:al Elettioi'. and one delegate
for each fiactionnl part thereof, of two hitmirrd
Totes or trore. Under this call tlie representation
of Kock Island connty will be, on 3,ii!4 vote-, 9
uefepites.
By order cf the Domorr.itic State Central Con;
mittee of Illinois. Dans P. FnKLrs. Chairman.
Theo. Nklson, siicrcMry.
Tlie followirc resolutirn wtv adooted by the
Demrcr.ilic State tcntial Coiiiniittce, February
2, 1W.
Be it reolved. That it is this sense of this Com
mittee, that the Amtialian Ballot 1 aw applies to
the election of officers at the annual towu n ett
ingtoall elections cxci pt as specially exevi ted
in said lfiw, and this committee recommend that
all elections to be held for town ofllcrrs this"
apring, be held nrder the provisions and according
to the letter of said law.
DEMOCRATIC I'ltlM Alii A M
IOXYKXTIOX.
The democratic vo'ersof Rovk Island are re
quested to assemble at the usual votliis placis in
tbeir respective wards atT:30 p. m., on
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1S02,
to nomirate Candidates in 'each Hard, for Hlder
nien, a follows: On earh'n all the wards for
two years and one eai h In the Sixth and Seventh
for one yeir. and to choose dcleia'es to the cnv
towmhip convention. The wards are entitled i'o
delegates as follow s, their ratio of representation
being one for every yo votes, and frac'.ional in
votes or OM-r cast for ) resicHru in lsss:
Vote. Ic-'.i rates.
First Watil 1M s
fecondWard "..218 11
Third Ward..: ','to 12
Fourth Ward Sirs in
Fifth Ward 21' i-.
Sixth Ward i:is 7
Seventh Ward 12:: B
Total ( r,
The delegates so e'.i i ti d w ill tin et at Turner
nail on
WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 1C,
at 7;3noclotk, for the purpose of nomitatini; can
didates for oiic superv:s. r I. r two years, two
assist att siipe.v isors for two years, town collector
and assessor; also te aptoiLtcuuirmaiicf the ci y-
iownsnip comuiutee.
HENRY L. WHEF.' AN.
Chairman Ci'.y-I o nship Ciiumir.ee.
Sanciamon county, III., democrats, in
convention Saturday, in resolutions en
dorscd Gtterbl Palrtur for tlie nomina
tion for president.
Fcott Wire was indorsed for renomi
nation to congress, by tbe Cass county
democratic centra! committee, in cession
at Virginia last Thursday.
Ogle county editors propose to prose
cute township, city and school officers
who fail to publith their annual reports.
aa required by law. The editors of Ogle
county are organized for mutual self pro
tection. .
"Cheapness Isn't always an angel of
mercy," said Major McKinlcy in a recent
banquet speech. This is quite true, sayi
the Dubuque Telegraph. Cheap labor,
for Instance, instead of an angel f
mercy is a demon of misery. It is a
cause of wide spread poverty, suffering
and crime. . And as the policy of protec
tion, which fint?s cxpressien in tbe law
bearing Major McKinley'a name, is con
stantly cheapening wages by encourags
ing instead of restricting immigration,
thus intensifying tbe competition be
tween laborers for permission to toil, it
is a public evil should be repealed. In
the caBe of the wage earner it is produc
ing an effect whicb its authors professes
to deplore.
Pbtok to leaving the United States Sir
Edwin Arnold made a speech In New
York city in which be said: "I ask your
permission before I conclude this last of
my readings with some verses from the
Persian of Sadi, which explains and jus
tifies my books, to effor, first to you, and
- next through you, to those G5 audiences
which I have had the honor to address in
various cities of the United States, my
most respectful and heartfelt thanks for
the grace and kindness of the receptions
which they have given roc. I do not pre
sume to praise what is far above rry
praise the large-minded enlightenment,
tbe glad interest in great thoughts whicb
I have found everywhere existing and
active in this country, evidenced to me in
many clear and remarkable ways. But I
will dare say that here, if anywhere in the
world, the poet, whose credentials are
honest good will toward his kind and firm
faith in tbeir glorious destiny, may fear
less? speak what ia in bis heart and brain
and be Bure of an altention as gentle, and
generous as it is cultivated. I came to
America her friend. I go away her
champion, her servant, her lover."
"Oh! for a ledge in some vast wilder
ness, some boundless contiguity of shade,
where rheumatism and headache would
never reach me more." Why! you
needn't travel so far, old fellow, just jltj
s bottle of Salvation Oil; that's what you
want-
f'h- Fa-m-ia' Homms.
Chicago Herald .
Poor men are twin;; crowded cut of
Illinois. The iuiic,t dJ. nl farmer is
every ,yar finoing bis p-it wsy narrower,
his hill more sieep, h's lond mi re Iiea.
Tbe renitr and hired man are taking the
place of a flee pof ulaiioo. Thirty fami
lies last week left a nit gle neighhivrhio1
in McLean connty becust since 1883 lard
vakes have i.creael 4) pr tin
all about tbem. In-rers d tx' ion fol
lows thit rise in valuation, ard farniig
which yields only a profit hi best will
not keep ptce with tbe ddled
burden. Those whose farms are
unincumbered can do better with
tbeir cipital in newer states. An in
quiry dfelops that the buyers arc inves
tors, no tirmers. Home after home bis
fallen icto the bands of capitalists who
require a cash rental too hopelessly h'gn
to admit a margin of profit to the bus
bamlman and on teims so severe that
surrender means loss. Cass county.
Livingston, L"gan and Me Lean arn alike
affeced. lt is estimated that 3. (MM) poi
sons will this tear leave central Illinois
for the cl eapi-r- lacih of the west. 'I hey
are men ho can ill be spared. Reports
may makt the Mate seem richer, but tiie
man who stands on the land that ho t wm
is worth more than a woild on mcney.
DEATH WON THE GAME.
Two t:rcat Clie-s Players Leave a Mar
velous Contest t llileeidoil.
Kiu-lit mnntlis ami ,t lialf the Kame had
eimt'on. Anil urli a ptmc, my children!
loin lYnn, lltitisher, aiiniu-r. Jonathan
Pyin, YankiH; Rutland nptiu-t America;
;ln Old Vt'crkl auainst the New!
Between t he Cltt! Klcotric of Xew York
mil the Club Eccentric t,f Loudon emula
;ion li:ul ex;.lte.l iis:-if to patriotism. On
ihe day of defeat tlu- flav: of ; he vanquished
nation would float reversed from the bal
sony of the dishonored club and all tho
:hessboanls for six months at least re
main veiled with crape.
Thus ope ily must be carried, and as
frankly borne, the.se tokens of inournint;
and alTront, which no revenue should ef
face. For such -vas the condition of the com
bat the mt.tch to 1k the only one of its
kind.
The momentous question of the battle
Jecidod upot, then anise the subsidiary
question, here should the encounter
take place?
They soticlit a ground of conciliation.
Cut w here ti id it J
Cornelius Kevick, the impresario, in
charge of the affair, proposed to charter a
steamer, vvhi: h should be stationed in mid
ocean, equidistant from the American and
tho Ensrlish coast, aboard which the two
adversaries s'louM lx-take themselves and
there remain while the match Insted. In
ireniotis as it was, however, this idea was
forced to the wail. They must find some
Dther v":y.
They found it in tlie elect He cable,
which once more was ttoinL; to un-rit its
name of a 'bond of union-' lietwei-u the
Old and Xew Worlds.
This is how it was that for eilit months
ami a half Jo latlian Pyin and Tom Penny
had disputed by dots and dashes for the
trlorious t it le of "I'idvcrsal Champioti of
the Noble Oatae of Chess."
At 12 o'tlo-k, say, Tom Pinny would
telesmtph to Jonathan Pym.
And one hoi r later Jouathan Pym would
respond.
Dating from Oct. l. 10, the (jrame for a
Ions while ha 1 been indecisive. Tow.v I
the end of llei cinU r Tom Penny showed
sins of weak ie-s, throw ins; the partisans
of Jonathan P; rn into a state of excitement
that set them to quarreling among them
selves like pol tknl "Ikisscs."
But sudilenl -, in the middle of January,
the English ch irnjiion by a genial ruse re
conquered all his lost advantage. Down
went Pym! up went Penny!
At bust, on tl e tilth day of May, 1SS!, the
American hail one of those inspirations
that conquer i-ven destiny. On the re
ceipt of his disj audi Tom Penny had acold
sweat.
But he did m t give up oh.no! and five
days later, on the 3Uth of May, had pir-i-tively
a gleam of hivpe. A sudden move of
his adversary h ul oiened to him a door of
safety. One sti di blunder at that moment
was decisive. Could it be possible?
Tom Penny f xamined the board more
closely. The blunder was not certain. It
might cover a supreme stratagem. What
should he thitiv? What course to pursue
of the two in view? Was it sham or error?
Should he pas; the door that had been
opened to him? If error, Jouathan Pym
was lost; if sham. Tom Penny was routed.
That day Tom Penny wrote out his own
telegram; he played his last Make and
knew it.
An hour later, unfolding his message,
Jonathan Pym s;niled triumphantly.
"Gentlemen," -laid he to his colleagues
of the Club Elect ric, "wait until tomorro.v I
In twelve hcurs' time England's champion
will have signed his own condemnation."
The next day in London members of the
Club Eccentric f mnd Tom Penny on the
floor of his chamber, struck down by apo
plexy and still rigidly clutching in his
hand the dispatch that had killed him.
And already fi r two long hours in the
grand salon of the Club Electric Jonathan
Pym hnd awaittd from Ixmdon the tele
gram of his vanquished foe.
Jonathan Pym frowned nnd fidgeted.
That telegram ha must have then, and
then only, could t he game be ended. With
out it the match vould remain unfinished.
The door openi d and a flunky appeared,
bearing on a salv r a folded paper.
"A dispatch for Mr. Jonathan Pym."
He seized it, opened it and read aloud
the following fout words:
"Your adversary is dead."
The paper escap 'd his lingers and fell to
the floor, caught ip at once by those be
side him to verify the text.
"That is not all!" they cried; "they de
mand a response"
"They shall have it!" said Pym, and
with a firm hard writing beneath the
line "Your adversary is dead" the two
words "I also!" hu drew a pistol from his
pocket and sent a I all through his brain.
The game was still a draw between
them, but was no longer an international
affair. Boston Globe.
Koiin-I Advlce.-
Mr. Neer What ousht we to do. doc
tor, as a community in order, to er to
meet the grip?
Dr.' Blunt Dou t meet it. mr dear
air; avoid it, Chicago Tribune.
It is said that a 'aclory in Aiicman i
now making unde-tdothing from a wood
fiber which is said to equal in every re
spect that made frorn wool.
The National lib-nry in Paris, with It
2,000,000 printed books and 1 00,000 tuana
scripts, ia the largest literary storehouse
la the world.
i WHEN HAWTHOHNE WAS SAD.
A a Insight Into tlie ICai-ly Career nf the
Famous American Uomanclst. 9
In the first decade after Hawthorne left
college he formed several plans of life, one
nf which was that of entering his uncle
Manning's counting house. In one of his
letters to me he spoke of this as a settled
purpose, but his repugnance to commercial
life was such that the plan was ultimately
abandoned, and he relapsed into the state
of partial inaction which so often results
from unsettled plans.
It is well known that soon after graduat
ing he prepared for the press a little vol
ume of tales entitled, 'Seven Tales of My
Native lind." The publisher who en
gaged to bring out the book was so dilatory
that at last Hawthorne, liecoming impa
tient a'ld dissatisfied with the excuses
given, peremptorily demanded the return
of the manuscript. The publisher, nroused
to a sense of his duty and ashamed of his
broken promises, apologized and offered to
proceed with the work at once, but Haw
thorne was inexorable, and thpugh, ns he
wrote mo at the time, he was conscious of
having been too harsh in his censures, he
would not recede, and he burned the man
uscript isi a mood half savage, half de
spairing As 1 expressed to him perhaps too
strongly my regret for this proceeding, he
did not, when Fanshawe was published,
confide to me the fart. Hearing, though,
of the publication, I procured a copy, and
subsequently mentioned it to Ilavv'thorne.
lie had tnea-time become dissatisfied with
the book, ani', he called in and destroyed
all the copies lie could reach. At his re
quest I bur ied my copy and we never al
luded to 1'anshawo aftcrwar '.. It was
at this time, I think, that he ecama ut
terly disheartened, and though conscious
of possessing more than ordinary literary
talent he almost abandoned all expecta
tion of success as an author.
In one of h;s letters to me, after relating
some of his disappointments, he compared
himself to one drifting helplessly toward a
cataract, and closed with these despairing
words, "I'm a doomed man, and over I
must go."
Happily the despondent mood was not
permanent, and he continued to write,
though subjected to frequent disappoint
ments. He was contributor for a little
while to a magazine published, 1 believe,
in New York. The compensation was
small, and even that the publisher pro
fessed his inability to pay; so Hawthorne
stopped his contributions and withdrew.
At the parting a characteristic incident
oecurreiL The editor begged for a mass of
manuscript in his possession, ns yet unpub
lished, and it was scornfully liestowed.
"Thus," wrote Hawthorne, "has this man,
who would be considered a Mifcenas, taken
from a penniless writer material incom
parably U tter than any his own brain can
supply." And he closed with a bitter male
diction upon the grasping editor.
He had the experience of being more
than once deceived by those who professed
to have tlie power and wish to befriend
him. A young man, with some means and
greater aspirations, commenced the publi
cation of a literary iu u -paper in Bo-ton
and ottered li.iut home the posit ion of co
editor. Another person, backed by a rich
lather, siipph.i.ted Il.jwthorne. who was
civilly bowed out, and the newspaper, af; r
a brief and sickly life, expired.
In the Hawthorne biography there ap
peared several old and carelessly written
letters of my own, answers to somo cf
Hawthorne's that were long since de
stroyed at his request.
These letters 1 should hardly have repro
duced except for the purpose of showing
that Hawthorne was at times quite de
spairing and in need of all the encourage
ment his friends could give. Horatio
Bridge in Harper's.
I sin;; Liquids at Meals.
A great deai of misapprehension is often
found to exist in the popular mind in re
gard to matters of eating and drinking;
the cause of this to some extent is to be
j traced to old time sayings, which have
come down to us in the form of a concen-
iraicu iiuusionoi sometxxiy s opinion upon
n subject of which he or sdie was woefully
ignorant. One Of these misapprehensions
to which we may refer is as to the injn
riousuess of taking fluid with meals. One
frequently hears it laid down as a maxim
! . I. n ..: :.. i i . i. ,
mat. ii is o.iu iu uniia. Willi your meais,
it dilutes the gastric juice," By way cf
explanation we may remark that "it im
plies that the fluid taken is harmful."
Whence this sagacious postulate origi
nally came we cannot tell; it has quite the
ring about it of an inconsequent deduction
formed by a person whose presumption of
knowledge was only exceeded by a lament
able ignorance of the subject. Medical
men often find much difficulty in dealing
with these "museum specimens of anti
quated science, for even educated persons
are disposed to cling to the absurdities of
their youth. Medical Press.
Kuropeao Coins.
The standard coins on the Continent are:
In Prance, the franc; in Spain, the peseta;
ftl Italy, the lira; in Holland and Austria,
the florin; in Germany, the mark; in Rus
sia, the ruble.
Belgium and Switzerland use the French
name for the piece of twenty sous. Each
of these pieces is. like the American dollar.
divided into 100 parts, called kopock in
j Russia, pfennig in Germany, kreutzer in
Austria, cent in Holland, nnd in Italy,
France and Spain by the word meaning
hundredth.
These small copper coins are used in the
postoflice in France and collectively in cei
tain industris, but are not in general cir
culation. In Italy and Spain tbeyhavea
purchasing value with the smail shop
keetiersand are seen everywhere. Chicago
Tribune.
f The Dinner Horn.
Details in regard to the manner in which
meals were served during the Dark Ages do
not abound. It is only toward the Twelfth
century that we begin to have a little light
tin this interesting subject. When a meal
was ready iu the Thirteenth century the
guests of a castle, with the vassals, were
assembled to the sound of a horn, a method
of summoning that appears to have been
the privilege only of tbe greatest lords.
Some hundreds of years later a bell was
used for tbe purpose
On large farms in the southern and west
ern states tbe horn has survived, though a
large bell is somirimes used. Svn Fran
cisco Chronicle.
Ivubiustein's Iteply.
When Rubinstein was traveling through
tbe United States upon a concert tour, it
chanced that Barn urn's circus followed
almost exactly the same route chosen by
tbe great Russian. On one occasion, when
the train was filled with snake charmers,
acrobata, clowns and the 'like, the guard,
noticing perhaps Rubinstein's remarkable
appearance, asked him: "Do yon belong to
tbe show?"
Turning bis leonine bead with a savage
hake Rubinstein answered fiercely, "Sir.
1 am tbe show." Ixmdoo Tit-Bita,
14.00
Gentlemen: We place
on sale a line of Calf and
Kangaroo Shoes in Con
gress and Bals equal to
any S5.0) shoe ever sold
in this market at the low
price of $4.00.
1623 Second Ave.,
THE TlUYiXEKS' HI IDE.
CHICAGO, KOCK ISLAND PACIFIC KA1L-
ay Depot corner Fifth avenue and Thirty-
nnt atreet. r rana u. riummer, ueiii.
TRAfNS. TLav. tABRiTE.
Council Blntls & Miuneso- I j .jn,,1 i:00am
ta Dav Expresa )
Kansas City Day Express...! 5:50 am 11:16 pm
Wathington Kxpreoa 3 :S8 pm 11 :05 pm
Ooaccin luffs sfc ilmncso- I ! .7.50 pm: 7-05am
ta :ess f '
Council Bltrls Denver I ,a sm ,3:39sm
Limit ei1 estthule Ex..) ,
Banaan City Limited , 10:65 urn 4:M am
Atlantic P;igscri r 8-15 .itr S:4. pm
ttioinkT w est. tGoicg cast. 'Daily.
BUitLINUTON KuLTS-C. B. y, RAIL-
ay Depot Kiret avenue and Sixteenth
M -T Vnnsp. nirml.
TRAINS. ' iie matvi.
B 7Loa r-.xpresa..". ttuaiTi 6.0am
8u Ui'f ftiprei.i' 7 S.i pm 7:1S pm
P.ml Kxvroas 5:til ptr. 8 0s am
aeanlstcwc PsFfcnccr. ... S:f5pm 10:35am
Way Frci: ht (Monmouth)... 8:ttaai 1:50pm
st?rtnti Fasncnrcr 7:15am fi:42pm
Savanna " j 5 15 am 3 45 pm
Daily.
CHICAGO. MILWAUKEE ST. PAUL KAIL
way Racine & teoutnweetern Division De
pot Twei.tieth street, between First and Second
avence, E. I. W. Holmca. agent. .
TRAIN'S. LaVB. ARBivjt
Mai. and Express :45trn, 8:00 pm
St. Panl Erpr. m 8:15 pm 11:25 am
-t. A Accommodation :tH);tt 10:10am
Accci modation 7:S6sit 6:10pm
ROCK ISLAND PEORIA RAILWAY D IS
pot First avenue and Twentieth street. F.
H. Rockwell. Agent.
TRAINS. Lv. !ABWT.
Fact Mall Express 8"rl0am 7:80 pm
Express 2:S0pm 1:80 pm
Cable Accommodation 8:10 am 8:00 pm
" i OOom 8:05 am
MOST DIRECT BOTJTX TO TUB
East. South and Southeast.
BAST ODNP.
FaetM'l. Expnss
Lt. Rock Island 8:10 am 8:ao pm
Ar. Orion 8:51 am 8:04 pm
Com'rdue 8:15am 8:27pm
Galya :44am 3:57 pm
Wyomine 10:30 am 4:85 pm
PrtLCjyille 10:8V am 4:57 pm
feorla ll:lB5am 5:55 pm
Bkomington 1:15 pmi 8:15 pm
Springfleld l'S:45pm 4:30pm
Jacksonville ' 4'00pm12-Q5n't
Decatur 8:50 pm'l0:00pm
Danville 8:50 pm13:10 n't
Indiauapolie I 6:85 pm 8:15 am
TerreHaute I 7:10 pm. 10:00 am
Evansville 1:20am 7:85am
Bt. Ionia ,S:U0iim 7:00am
Cincinna'i ,10:00pm 7:00 am
Louiaviile '
west ots.
Lv. Peoria...': 110:15 am 4 :10 pra
At. Kock Island j :30 pm! 7:30 pm
Accommodation trauis leave Rock Is and at
8 :00 a. m. and 6 45 p. m ; arnve nt Peoria 8 :45 p.
m. and a :30a m. leave Peoiia 6:00 a. m. and
7:15 p. m; arrive Rock Island 4 :00p.m. and 2:05
p. m.
All trains ren daily except Sunday.
All passe per train, arrive and depart Union
deoot , Peoria.
Free Clair car on Fast Express between Rock
Is'ond and Peoria, both directions.
Tbiougli ticket 10 all points; baggage cnecked
tbrongh to destination.
CABLl BRANCH.
Aceom.
Accoia
4.00 pu
6.08 nit
lAccoin
Lt. Rock Island.
Arr. Reynold....
Cable
8.I0 am
10 20 am
estrn
7 80 am
8 05 am
11.00 am
5.40 pn
lAcrdrfl. 1 Arxvim lAcjsnm
Lt. Cable...'.
At. Reynold
B.20 am 180 pn 8.45 pm
7 00 toil 1.45 po 1 4 25 pra
7.5f am1 S.00 pa 1 6.30 pir
Hock island..
n stmrov
TA.'KBULaA
-:' Tkt. Aw
Superintendent.
4r Me lAqmir Ustoia. loitlvel 4 uit-d
' by Mliwtrrixtrrixar Itr. UuAura'
- VolHm MsrrOr.
lt 1. maaofaettiredaaapowdisr.wnicB ean bectvrn
? '" ' br-a oup of coaea or tta. or in lood,
without tiie knowledge oftne paUent. It is absolute)?
hiiinleaa, and will erteet a pmnaneat and speedy
curj, whether the aatienl is a moderate drinker or
an alooholi" wreck It baa been given In thousand,
or oases, ai. J in every instanoe a perteet core has fol
''W-mJ. It aerer l iHa. Th system onoe impregnat
ea witn the Speolflcjt becomes aa att.r impossihilitj
sot the Honor appetite to eiist,
WUlEi PlM'I lC--o stole Prssrirtsn.
, CaMCIttNATI, OHIO
43 pac book of jmrttonlm nre. To ba had of
For sale by MarahaU Filter and T. H.
vi. arogxi.ta. ,
;$4.00i
1 he" Bostonl
WACJU'IKTEOMTH THE GEOCBACi'.T OF THiS COUNTRY V.lll CBIA'tl
KUCH VltfUBlE HiFORHHTlON fflDM A SWDY Of THIS tUP CF THE
-re.
IV
i' . 1 .t .1.. ' : :L 1 j'
CMcaio, Bod Maai &MScEy,
The Dirrct Route tn and from rMrago. Joliet. Ottawa,
1'coria, La Salle, Mnline, E H:uiJ, in ILLINOIS;
riavenport, tu.-atino. otrurnwc, ikal.-x5a, Pes
Moines, V.'interset, Aul,ilnn, Hor'.an anl Council
IiluiTs, In IOWA; Minneapolis ami St. IHiul. in MIN
NESOTA; Watertown ami Sioux Fall, in DAKOTA;
Cameron, St. Joseph and Kansas City, in MIssOL'Ul;
Omnba, L'ncoln, Fairbury an 1 Nelson, in NEBRASKA;
Atchison, Leavenworth, Horton, Tupeka, llutrlilnson!
tVidiita, Belleville, Abilene, Dodge City, Caldwell, in
KANSAS; Kingfisher, El Reno and JJinco, In INDIAN
TERRITORY: Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo,
in COLORADO. Traverses new areas of rkh farming
and grazing lands, affording the best facilities of Inter
communication to all towns and cities east and west,
northwest and southwest of Chicago and to Tacific and
trans-occauic seaports.
MA GN1FICENT
VESTIBULE EXPRESS TRAINS
Leading all competitor. In splendor of equipment,
between CHICAGO and DE3 MOINES, COUNCIL
BLUFFS and OMAHA, and between CHICAGO and
DENVFR. COLORADO SPRINGS and PUEBLO, via
KANSAS CITY and TOTEKA ani via ST. JOSEPH.
Flrst CIass Day Coaches, FREE RECLINING CHAIR
CARS, and Palace Sleepers, with Dining Car Service.
Close connections at Denver and Colorado Springs with
diverging railway lines, bow forming the new and
picturesque
STANDARD GAUGE
TRANS-ROCKY MOUNTAIN ROUTE
Over which superbly-equipped trains run dally
THROUGH WITHOUT CHANGE to and from Salt
Lake City, Ogden and San F-ncisco. THE BOCK
ISLAND Is also the Direct anr Favorite Line to and
from Manltou. Pike's Peak and all other sanitary and
scenic resorts and cities and mining districts in Colorado.
DAILY FAST EXPRESS TRAINS
From St Joseph and Kansas City to and from all Im
portant towns. cities and sections Id Southern Nebraska,
Kansas and the Indian Territory. Also via ALBERT
LEA ROUTE from Kansas City and Chicago to Water
town, Sioux Falls. MINNEAPOLIS and ST. PAUL,
cennsctlong for all points north and northwest between
the lakes and the Pacific Coast.
For Tickets, Maps, Folders, or desired Information
apply to any Coupon Ticket Office tn the United States
r j . 1 1
v. vMiRua, or auuresa
E. ST. JOHN, JOHN SEBASTIAN,
Genl Manager. GenT Tkt. Pas. Agt,
CHICi. O. L
m .. v '- -.j s N
; n,;:s.-.t.' .1r!t--j:".Vi.r...- - T -v-
f y - -- ;
THE WOUNE
STATE SAVINGS BANK.
MOLINJE. - ILLS.
Office Corner Fifteenth street and Third Ave.
CAPITAL $100,000.00.
Succeeds the Ifoline Savings Bank. Organised 1869
S FEB CEIL 1ITEBEST PUD 01 DEPOSITS
Organized under State Laws.
Open from 9 a. m. to 8 p. m, and Wednesday and
Saturday nlghta from 7U8.
Pobtbb Bkihmcb, . . - , President
H. A. AmswoKTK, - - Vice-President
Cr.Bl.utiT. - - Cashier
DIRECTORS:
v Porter Skinner, S. W. Wheelock,
C. A. Rom, H . A. AJnsworth,
O. H. Kd wards, W. H. Adams,
Andrew Fribara;, C. F. Demeaway
Hiram Darling
.oo
I hese shoes arc porfe
fitters, new uo,ls. Tree
styles, genuine hand
and guaranteed i..
satisfaction. W'e v.
these shoes at S4 'j
closed; so don't dclav.h-
be fitted before
broken.
Rock Island.
OPtntTifts c'.t
1000FiIg?ofi?::
OWA,
MINNESOTA
SOUTH DAKOTA
Solid Trains
i l:v. i : n
Chicago, Minnr;api.!i-- .-nd St. ?au!
Ym the K;imo-i 1 :. . 1. .
St. Louis. I.Tirsneapo'.is St. Paul
Via St. Louis, Mi'in--..;.. ill-.i s' i . -. :
Through Sleepers and Chair Cars
KfTw: :
KANSAS CITY, WiNNf flPCt:S f NO ST. K'.'L
PEORIA, CEDAR FPICS ANu CICUX ff .lS. Oil
CHICACO AND CEDAn RAPiLS
Vio the l';iM j.. ..
THE SHORT LINE
1
V"t) SPIRIT LAKE
Tlie Great low. t r-t!; 1.: : .t 1 Kc-.-rt
For Railway' atxl il.'t I ! t I'--.V.;
ramplilet ami a':! tut !, : '. . .i-.-v
tieti'l Ticket ami 1 - 1 A-' i.t.
FOR CHEAP HOMES
On line of this r.ia.l in ':!
Southeastern Miniiesoi.i ati.i titr.ii l'-' '.
where tlnuiht ami cr. lail-:f are a!.w:
Thotisamls of chei'V :u r. s i f fc.uil vet i;ii-i.
Local Kxcursi.iii rites - n 1 er 1 .ii iiil.i
tionastopncesiif I:i:,. .ia.i i.ite-nf lari',.iilrfl
Uen'l Ticket ami I':ts-. w-'- r A j-nt
Ail of the Fa.wtii.-ei- 1 nm ait I':-n-:j -t
tills Itailwav are iu-aieil I y st.-.mi Ir.i ti"
eiiKine, ami tlicMatn l.im- !. ' l'.iv -nvrlri.!
are ligltted with the Elect rn- l.:irlit. .
Maps, Time Tables, Tlinii-li l-it-'-s tici al.
formation fun.isheil mi aip!ieati"ii m A-a
Tickets on sale over this r.:te al all Mii.,;s-W
points In the Cliion. and l v its .U-'-nls, U
parts of the I'liited States 1 aaa.l.i.
ta"For aniioiuicenienls ot Ei urM"n 1. i 'v
and local matters of interest, i'1-.i.-e r. t-r '.-
local columns ot tlus jiaj- r.
C. J. IVES, J. E. HANNEG.
Vres't 4 lran'1 Supt. i;:.i 1 s: i !' ii1
CEOAR RAPIDS. IOWA
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HSI.TaM irr w - -
Constipation Pfes
SPEEDILYCUBED.
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