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Ottumwa weekly courier. (Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa) 1872-1899, September 05, 1877, Image 2

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WEEKLY COURIER.
WKONKSDAY MOHNINO, SH-T. is:*.
John P. Irish LIFT* BOON
Johnny
1'.
Mr. Wilson
THIS
3rears has been:
Fiscal year.
187
5
187
6
187
7
just
he spend*.
the most
conspicuous sdvocfttc OI I*ND
specie RESUMPTION ANIONS
itor* in low*.
nil
THE ed­
In liis forthcoming
raid after GREENBACK votes, on
donblc-cncier
the Washington correspondent
COVRIKR who wrote over
hM been
fKbdidate
(Mhing.
Ve hope
ABLE to
a
platform,
he
will find
the M-onl of John 1*. Irish frequent
ly ving into his own fuee.
DENNIS M.UIONFY, editor Dubuque
Telegraph also bolts the nomination
of
Irish, unless the latter
will get down ofl'of his Tilden hard
money platform and
adopt the
Baby." Mahouev has his
Cheyenne
''KNJR
ecrtitieate
of democracy direet from Fort Lafay
ett. He graduated with Dean.
3. C. P. Poulton, KSI]., local editor
of the
Sun, and formerly
of the
"Potomac,"
nominated as a liopublic&n
for the Legislature in WY-
to chrouicle his election
Tim Walker was heaten, the other
day,for Representative,in his
tjr, bv Hotckiss, the old member. In
4T
to
48 votes.
appreciate the
7
to
S
business
Btill we should have rather seen Tim
Win, provided
there was any
danger
of the
election of a Democrat over
there.
The Republicans of Scott county
have nominated W. A. Foster,a very
•mart
young lawyer, and brother ot
Dr. Foster,
occasionally of Ottumwa,
L»r Senator,
and the balance of the
ticket ia made up of Liberals and Re
publicans. The convention rcpud
"tiled the temperance
plank of the Re-
JUblican platform.
A
bill has been found ngalnst Ex-
Jov. Chamberlain of South Carolina
for
embezzlement, and Wade Hamp
ton has issued a requisition on
Gov.
Bobinson of New York, to bring
Chamberlain before
(MF the
•dsqnires
THE
a rifle club
gang
Palmetto State for trial. It
all the patience ever
SESSED by
POS­
the mildest mannered Saint
Earth to view such operations
With any equanimity.
GOLD,
to-day, drops
030,000 of
to
37„'.
This
Is most encouraging. It must be that
financial wiseacres see, in the near
future, such
a balance of trade in our
flaTor, with Europe, as to expect there
from the easy resumption of specie
payments and
a swelling tide of pros
FERITY
to set in upon us. The imme
jliate cause for the dropping in gold,
%O-day, was,.perhaps, the sales
of
$1,
gold in New York by Sec
tetary Sherman.
One of Timothy (). Walker's
plank* in the platform adopted at the
recent Democratic County Conven
tion, at Bloomfield, declares as fol
low*:
"3. Destruction
of the National
Banking system."
The people of Davis county have
reeently destroyed Glenn's National
Bank,and Ellis' private bank,so that
We
don'tsee
any need of this partial
declaration of their capacity as bank
smasher*.
Turks again claim a decided
victory along the river Lom. The
fighting quality of the Turks in this
contest ha* been so tested as to prove
beyond all question that the Turkish
soldiery will compare favorably with
the soldiers of any nation in
the
whelming force of the
HON. WILSON SHANNON
a* an
who
OLD JOHN BROWN.
over­
Russians will
ever win for them final success.
Hen. James F. Wilson.
On Wednesday
night, the 5th inst.,
Hon. James F.^Wilson
will
address
the people of Ottumwa, giving spe
cial attention to the labor and|finance
questions of^the hour.
IS
men in the nation
one of the ablest
and
Lewis' Opera
Bouse, where the speech is to be
delivered, should be crowded on that
occasion.
We hope the people
of the country
and of the neighboring towns will
come in and hear* the true political
goapel expounded.
died at his
home in Lawrence, Kansas, on the
30th ult. He ha*hadsomewhat of an
eventful career as
a democratic poli
tician, going out of public notice,
however, after the settlement of the
Free State vs. Slave State
fight in
Kansas. Since then he has been prac
ticing law at Lawrence. lie was
twice Governor of Ohio, and was the
opponent of Tom Corwin for Govern
or, by whom he was beaten in the
celebrated campaign of
1840.
lie
Itl* KMI Ik KlarrkUf •1-KllnttH
iNnikf niacin* Npoerli IMI.
••r lagan* at nmwMWIt,
Kanaaa.
The Immortals Our Time,
JAneotn, V. 8. (IraH# ani Jnhn
llrotrn.
At the dedication of 'the John
Brown
Monument at Ossawatomie,
Kansas, on Thursday,Senator In gal
was
President Polk's Minister to Mexico,
and Pierce's Territorial Governor
of Kansas from '55 to '5.
This balance in our favor
must increase largely duringtho next
year. We should
much more
have felt this very
than we
A* a matter of
have, had we not
been ia debt on our bonds
in
Europe.
general information
which is important to the voters of
Wapello county, we
publish to-day a
statement of A. W. Gaston,
touching
eertaiu of Dr. Stewart's transactions,'
with
O. W. Lynam&
Co which Mr.
Gaston and his friends think should
disqualify Dr. Stewart from properly
discharging the duties of the Sheriffs
office, for
which he
candidate.
It will be observed that we also
give what Dr. Stewart's Attorneys
have to say
on the other side of
the
question. Mr. Gaston is one of the
oldest and best known Attorneys in
Wapello county, having been at one
time Prosecuting Attorney for this
county,and always standing high for
veracity and integrity and invariably
being a prominent and uncomprom
ising leader
in
circulation
me at this time to seal my testimony
for
(iod
and humanity with my blood,
will do vastly more towards advanc
ing the cause
I
I
SEN
other wav.
1
think
the cause
1
Already those who were considered
the great intellectual leaders in this
opinion in this crusade are dead.
The autonomy of the States had
been restored. The pestilent heresy
of
State
the
condensed statement shows at
a glance what the United States bal
ance-sheet for the last three
States
have earnestly endeav­
ored to promote than all
I
in my life before.
feel just
sovereignty had been recant­
ed, and in its place appeared the true
gospel of American nationality.
But all great moral movements
have their oscillations. They reach
a culminating point as a pendulum
moves to the end of its arc, and then
with constantly increasing velocity
and momentum they sweep down the
curve on the inevitable return from
their remotest excursion. For the
past seven years the path of the nation
has been downward. If either of
the amendments were submitted
States
to-day
fiscal
r.l,M8,13fi
187
6 lSit.SJ8.10a
1*77
The above is an excellent showing
for as, and is really
the cause which
is bringing gold down and pushing
our bonds to the very front rank
among the nations. It is making the
United States richer from year to
year,
individual gets richer
is constantly earning more
than
I
A
Total exports. Total imporit.
$tt05,M4fHra 9rAB,uo6,7)
7M,890, OT3 470,077,671
658,K*7,7S3 4v2,tisi ,**3
This represents
an
excess of United
States exports over imports for each
year as follows:
187
5
where
Hold as iu any
1
cannot now hotter serve
1
for
love so much than to die
it,and in my
death
I
than in my life.
may do more
do not believe
1
L.crd
should if
I
coun
•ige
Timothy will now be
shall deny my
and Master Jesus Christ, and
do not believe that
one of them could receive the number
of votes necessary for ratification.
It has become unpopular
to speak
of disloyalty and treason. The scars
and uniform of the Union soldier are
badges of dishonor and passports to
contumely in many of the States.
school of political pigmies whom
Providence for some inscrutable pur
pose has placed in power, are endeav
oring to pacify the country by de
bauching its convictions by asserting
that those who sought to overthrow
and destroy the government are more
entitled to its favors than those who
sacrificed all to uphold it: by at
tempting to obliterate the distinction
between right and wrong, and to re
peal the laws of God. They are
seeking to put the new wine of li77
into the old bottles of 18L0, with the
probability of the ultimate loss of
both receptacles and contents.
Reinforced by these perfidious al
lies under the delusive banners of
peace, harmony, and reconciliation,
the vanquished enemies of the nation
have been steadily and relentlessly
pursuing their purposes to regain
what they lost. They have falsified ev
ery pledge by which they secured their
political restoration.
I'nion. They promised
partially administered.
solemn covenants hare been observed
we
know
too well,
ering pretext
in the democratic
BE
the councils of the
democratic party.
These communications which wc
presume are but the
prelude to a gen
eral engagement on this subject, to
gether with an editorial demanding
the withdrawal of John
P.
Irish as
the democratic candidate for Gover
nor, for very good reasons,
AR
there
in set forth, are taken from the Ot
tumwa Democrat, of the ISOl'.I inst.,
which claim* to be the leading organ
of
that party hereabout*.
We believe that the Daily and
Weekly COUKIEK have more demo
cratic reader* than all the democratic
papers ia this county put together.—
Hence we give this little row iu the'
happy family, the benefit of oar wider I WVCTIONED
restored. Murder has become one
of the political tine arts, and assassin
ation a logical argument. Governors
and sheriffs who conspire with mobs
of felons and protect them from pun
ishment are rewarded by renomina­
ting,
it
exist.
I
deny my principles against
shivery.''
What immortal and dauntless cour-
breathes in this procession of
stately sentences: what fortitude
what patienfc what faith what radi
ant and eternal hope Over his soul
hovered the covenant of peace. lie
felt the loftiest consciousness of
Ori*«ls that
WON- r«yal
in a
He believed there was no acquisi
tion so splendid as moral purity no
possession nor inheritance so desira
ble as personal liberty: nothing on
this earth nor in the world to come
so valuable as the soul, whatever be
the hue of its bodily habitation no
impulse so lofty and heroic as an un
conquerable love of truth, and an in
vincible determination to obey God.
.therecan
LAML IWYRMD
ls that WPVt
Kc»']«lcrs.''
He trod the
I
was presiding over the Senate when
Sumner left the chamber for the last
time in life, and
1
saw his remains
borne from the Capitol, which had
been the scene of his labors for near
ly a qnarter of a century.
I
was with
Vice President Wilson the day before
he died, and witnessed the unparal
leled display that attended the funeral
cortege as
it moved through
Chief Justice Chase, then a
broken and disconsolate old man,just
lingering on the verge of dissolution.
They are almost forgotten. Their
names are no longer on the tongues
of men. Their speeches have died out
of popular remembrance. Seward
yet lives by a fortunate phrase—"the
irrepressible conflict,"—which was
not his own, except as an adopted
foundling.
The student of the future will ex
hume their orations and arguments
and State papers, as a part of the sub
terranean history of the epoch. The
antcquarian will dig up their remains
from tho alluvial drift of the period
and construe their relations to the
great
events in which they
were act
ors
but the three men
who
will loom
forever against the horizon of time as
the representative, conspicuous types
of this era, like the pyramids above
the desert, or inountuin peaks above
the subordinate plains, are
AltR All AM
LINCOLN, 1!. S. fill ANT, AND
OLII.IOIIN IIKOWN,
of Ossawatomie and
that the last
the mat
ter of stubborn fighting. The re
peated assaults upon the next to im
pregnable position of the Russiaus in
the Schipka pass, demonstrates
that
the Turk*are as brave and fearless
A* men can
be. Nothing but
I am not
is admitted that they
TL.C
acts
are excused upon the
ground that they are commit
young, misguided
aud passionate
call it
Is
delivered a masterly orntion. Wc
make the following cxlracts
John llrown said
'I
can trust tiod
with both the time and manner of my
death, believing, as
1
now do, that for
have done
as content
to die
for
God's Kternal Truth,andfor suffering
humanity on the
be
110
kinjr
sc itl'okl
with the step
of a conqueror, and the man whom
Virginia executed
AR
a felon,
to-day
polite
Kansas
canonizes as a martyr.
cit­
izen*, inflamed beyond endurance by
the wrongs of which they have been
the victims. Speechless submission
to these
llngrant
violations of the so
cial compact is called pacification and
harmony. Tacitus has titlv described
this condition of things in a single
sentence
"Solitudinem facient
peaco.
I
sure
began to acquire homes and
property. They
fiHod
savings banks
with their earnings. They assumed
definite domestic relations. They
gathered about
the schoolmaster and
eagerly
.studied
the alphabet, the
primer, the Bible.
to
HV
They promised
that education should be uuivcrsal,
but they refuse appropriation*for the
support of schools, burn school-hous
es, expel the teachers and discharge
the professors in their universities
who believed in the preservation of
the
that suf­
frage should be protected, freedom
ot' speech and opinion maintained
equal rights enforced, and justice
IM­
How these
Under the shelt­
ot
state,
it is announced that
and recognized as leaders of
the people, and, while slavery is not
restored by name, the frecilmen are
being rapidly reduced by indirect de
vices a condition of servile depen
dence that has all the horrors of slav
ery, with none of its alleviations,
"llome
rule" means the right to mur­
der with impunity, and
government" the right of a white
minority to suppress a black ma
jority by systematic violence
and wholesale assassination.—
And when the beneficent interven
tion of the nation is invoked in be
half of those whom it is bound
by the
most sacred obligations to protect,
the appeal is denounced as an inva
sion of the rights of the States be
cause the wrongs are not afflrmative
the
I Constitution and statutes of those
and'authorlzed by
ct
pacem appellant"—they make a des
ert and
When a repentant rebel Is
I AI1KI) AS A CM1INKT MINISTER
and made the chief attract ion of a per
ipatetic menagerie, called out
at eve
ry railroad station and compelled to
speak his little declamation like a
naughty pupil by his master, telling
the multitude that he has been very
wicked, but means to do better and
hopes in time to become a good Yan
kee, the spectacle is edifying and in
structive. The emotions of the cap
tive may be imagined, and tho re
sponse of
the
.south
solid. We
is significantly
must be reconciled.
West, in the
must
sure
will not
be first. He has
a prodigious grip upon the public im
agination. His example is bedded
deep in the general conscience. There
are more men in America to-day who
can sing the
"John
any other hymn, unless it may be the
long-meter
"Old
Wo
must love each other. We must for
get. Let us wash the crimson from
our flag, because
it
is the hue of the
blood shed by patriots in defense of
their country the blue from its field
because
it.
was the color of our sol
dier's uniform, and their gold from
its stars, hccausc they shone upon the
epaulets of our heroes
No, President, let us not do
ceive ourselves nor bo deceived
There can lie no truce between right
and wronsr. In
the'conflict of
idea
armistice. The gigan
tic revolution through which we
have passed did not arise upon
point of etiquette, and it cannot be
ended by a
apology. It was
the
a
great struggle between two hostile
and enduring forces which must con
tinue until one or the other shall be
come displaced and expelled from ou
system of government.
IT
must
GI
on either till the right of one man,or
class, by violence or force, to pre
scribe the opinions, control the acts,
and define the political relations
others is freely conceded, or until the
right of every individual, however
humble, to think, act or vote, in ac
cordance with
last. It will
till
tho
unity
nation is undisputed
New
York City on its way to his last rest
ing place in Massachusetts.
I
wit
nessed the administration of the
second oath of office to President
Grant
by
will
Senator
ISrown"song than
llundrod''doxology.
It is an immortal strain, and stirs the
soul like the solemn diapason of an
an organ iu the
fretted vaults of a ca
thedral.
Seven years ago the mission of
John Brown seemed to have been ful
ly
accomplished. The Declaration
of Independence
was no
longer a lie.
Slavery was destroyed, and its fur
ther existence inhibited
by
constitu
tional enactment. The frecdinen, by
their sobriety, their obedience to law,
their decorous demeanor, justified the
temerity of those who had dared to
maintain that tliey possessed intelli
gence superior to beasts, and souls
that were immortal. During centu
ries of brutal and degrading bondage,
the)- had retained the typical charac
teristics of their race. Their virtues
were their own their vices were the
offspring of the cruel system of which
they had been tho reluctant victims.
'They
have shown that there
has been no great contraction of
the volume of the currency, particu
larly the greenback curreucy, about
which so much complaint has been
made.
I
have
have already shown that wc
$4,000,000
more greenbacks
we had during
that there will be
THAI)
LSTW,
aud the tive pros­
perous years that followed, and
I
peration will begin, slowly at
A
The republican party
speech, and
irant, he would have recognized him
as
tod by
Governor and sustained
tho full
right
till
cred and liberty secure
TO
shadow of the
mountains, in the great valley, or by
the shore of gulf or sea. so long the
conflict,
never end
and supremacy of the
life is sa­
till the
op­
portunities for knowledge are as uni
versally diffused as the desire to
know, and the pursuit of happiness
as unlimited as the capacity to enjoy.
In view of these considerations our
exercises to-day have a profound sig
nificance. ller territorial pupilage
educated Kansas to freedom,and she
lias not forgotten that bloody tuition.
Twenty-one years have elapsed since
John Brown and his associates
died that the State might be
free.
I
see before mo many who par­
ticipated with them in those early
contests, and who still stand as sleep
less sentinels upon the watch-towers
of liberty. Tho siren and seductive
song of peace
not delude their
vigilance nor lull them into security.
The passions engendered in that
epoch have subsided,but its lessons
remain,and this monument, which wc
dedicate is not alone a momento of
the past, but it is an admonition for
the present and the future. It an
nounces that, agaiimt all the blandish
ments, the temptations of place, or
profit, cr expediency, we dedicate
ourselves to assert and defend those
vital principles of justice and recti
tude which
are the foundation not
alone of all individual welfare, but
oftrue
national grandeur.
SENATOR A LISON'S SPEECH
Allison
delivered a very
able speech, at Waterloo, Iowa, last
Thursday, which wc lind reported in
full in
the Dubuque Times.
Wc have only room to-day for the
following concluding part of it:
I1A1UI
Tmks.
The democratic party have tried
and are still trying, to fasten upon
the republican party all responsibility
for the business depression through
its conduct of the finances aud what
they arc pleaBed to call the contrac
tion policy.
am
money enough
to conduct all the business that there
is
to be done, money
enough to carry
all our products to market. These
hard times must be traced to other
causes undue speculation, excessive
imports, extravagant living and
in
vestments in iinremuiierative projects
They arc not confined to our country
they are more severely felt in Kngland
and on the Continent. They exist in
countries where specie payment pre
vails, as well as in ours where wc
have an inconvertible curreucy.
We have been compelled for many
years to suffer great burdens arising
from the war. These burdens wiil
cling
to the present
men, they
generation of
all play their part iu
troubles.
We
our
have a heavy debt,
National State and municipal, upon
which interest must
BO
paid by means
of taxation. Our recovery will be
slow, and by healthv process only.—
We must let go extravagance, and
practice individual and National
economy earn money and save some
i n o w a we e a n. I w e a e i n
debt strive to reduce
it.
Then recu­
first
but successfully in the not very far
distant future. This year we are
blessed with good crops'and fair pri
ces. But one crop alone
will not suf
fice.
few years of successful pro­
duction will work out the cure, and
we must await
the
process with pa­
tience. No cunning device of paper
promises
will help us
now but only
hinder iu the end.
KCONOXI v.
Last year we heard much of the
ex­
travagance of the Government. That
cry as
I
said
to yon
is abandoned.—
HA*,
1
year by
year, reduced the expenses and re
duced the burdens of the public debt
since
180*.
That policy of reduction
and economy is still being pursued by
the present
Administration,
as
by Secrelarv Sherman's
I
sec
.Mansfield
have no doubt
will
con­
tinue iu the future as in the past.
TilIC SorrilKliN Vl'I STION.
The action of the administration
in rolatiou to South Carolina and
Louisiana has been severely criticized
a portion of the Ucpubiicati press,
and by many itepuhlicans who were
sorely grieved by such action. It
cannot be denied that there is a great
diversity of sentiment among itcpub
licans on this subject. Our State con
vention, largely attended, and com
prising the representative men of the
party in our State,and though many
Itcpublicans were dissatisfied with
the situation,refrained from making
any declaration of opinion on this
subject, deeming
it
or not to open
the sovereignty of the
atrocious despotisms have
been
erected on the luius of liberty. Pop
ular majorities have been suppressed
by the most revolting methods known
to tyrants. But one political opinion is
tolerated, ami when the
himself.
organization
that entertains opposing views has
been disbanded by carnage and ter
ror,
the causes
which justified fri\ud anil violence no
longer existing,honest elections must
in
faithfully as
"local
I
ease, so
self-
him with
power of tho
General Gov­
ernment.'' If Packard was duly
elected and entitled to the office, ana
if it
was the duty of President Grant
'n
January to protect him against the
claim*
TOT
up by Nichols, it is difficult
to see how that claim became less
mporative in March, under the pres
ent administration, because in the
meantime tho usurpation had grown
more powerful In the
The Constitution contemplate* in
tervention only when unlawful com
binations in a State become so for
midable that tho proper and lawful
State Government cannot suppress
them.
I
was
concede that the question
a complicated and difficult one.
It is claimed for the President that
because of the failure of President
rant to sustain Packard in January,
the usurpation became so powerful as
that the Nichols Government consti
tuted the only defacto Government in
the State in March.
It is also urged
with much force that the new House
would follow the last and refuse to
vote army supplies except on condi
tion that troops-should not be used to
sustain tho Packard government, and
that by force
of circumstancos on the
1st of July last the President would
have been compelled
to
withdraw the
troops or submit to tho dishandmcnt
of the army.
IT
seems scarcely possi
ble that such revolutionary action
would have been adopted by tho
House. Nevertheless, it is true that
the House
defeated the Army
Bill
last session, because this revolution
ary proceeding was not assented to
by the Senate. Those are some of
cease
of
suggestions of bis
own judgment and conscience un
der tho law shall be absolutely un
questioned. So long as this right is
denied or abridged under any pre
text, or in any locality. North. South,
East
or
the
considerations that are said to have
animated the President in his deci
sion. Before taking final action, the
President exacted and received an un
qualified promise from the dominant
leaders in South Carolina and Louis
iana and other States of the South
that in the future turbulence and vio
lcnce should
that the diaboli­
cal methods before resorted to for
carrying elections, should be aban
doned that there should be no pro
scription because of political opin
ions: that the colored man should be
protected by law in the free enjoy
ment
every right, including the
vote. Secretary Sherman,
speaking for tho President, says those
conditions must bo fulfilled, and if
not fulfilled by tho voluntary action
of the officers of tho State, the power
of the Administration will be exerted
to its utmost in protecting these
rights.
1
hope this experiment of concilia
tion will be successful and these
promises will be kept that order and
good government in the south will
follow,and that her people will go to
work and build up the waste and des
olate places,and contribute their part
to the growth and prosperity of the
whole country. Whatever may be our
individual opinions or wishes in
re
lation to tho state governments i n
Louisiana and South Carolina, the
action of tho President is final. There
is no power in Congress,or elsewhere
to reverse it now. Hampton and
Nichols are in the enjoyment of their
offices,and are exercising undisputed
authority in their respective states.
Speaking for myself alone,
a small well
I
that Packard was not sustained iu his
rightful authority. But if the Presi
dent has made a mistake with refer
ence to these two states, even he can
not retrace his steps now in reference
to either of them. We can only wait
and see tho experiment tried.
THK SOI.III SOUTH.
I
think there is serious cause for
apprehension of danger to the coun
try from a solid Democratic South.
During the last lew years tho control
ling influences there have used every
effort, and have resorted to the most
unscrupulous and despicable methods
to crush out and destroy the Repub
licans there. Year by year State aft
er State has passed under Democrat
ic control, generally by violent, dia
bolical and revolutionary methods,
until now they hold absolute sway.
This, if maintained, will enable that
section of the
1'iiion,
But grant, if you please, that these
are mere apparitious aud not reali
ties. It is still dangerous to
amendments to the Constitution, if
at all, with their
own interpretation,
that the
IF FLIO
shall
could tho Louisiana
called, in
that connection.
believed then and
States
wise to tolerate
these differences and leave every lie
publican free to entertain and express
his Individual views.
1
endeav­
these political
wounds
sought to be healed by the action of
our State convention,but with a brief
statement shall leave, that question to
be considered by each
Kcpublican for
I was
present last winter at
Washington, and mingled in the ex
citenicnts of the heated and angry
contest
for the presidency that fol
lowed the election in November.
1
voted
favor of counting the Kc­
publican
(doctoral
vote of Louisiana
for President Hayes.
I*
examined as
fail,
1
I
believe now,
that Packard was fairly elected Gov
ernor that the Legislature elected
was Kepublie.au.
I
concur in the
views recently expressed by Secreta
ry Sherman as
to tho
character of the
contest in Louisiana, as to the proof
of the intimidation and violence there
systematically prosecuted to wrest
from the Republicans their rightful
majority, which failed through the
action of the Keturning Board.
I
agree with him that Packard, under
this sifting process, was entitled to be
Governor nor do
1
deny that
the final dccUion, with reference
to Governor was
iu the
Legislature. But
hands of the
1
cannot
concur
with him in his statement when he
says that
it was tho duty
of President,
Grant to use the power of the Feder
al Government and not the duty of
hie successor to do
so. Sec'v Sher
man declares his belief iu the elec
tion of Packard a:id states that
AIEHIOAI HRBADSTOrlS.
The PwinrllM C*r»li mu Can
pared wlik Foreign C»amtrl«a
—The Preaeat St ,te iki
ana Ita Fatara
tfrom the Now York sas
According to
a rcccnt
hibit made'by
000
State.
ccnt. in
more
with one-third
of the population, and less than one
third of the property, to practically,
control the legislative and executive
policies of tho national government.
Many believe that they will wield the
power upon all the great questions
growing out of the war go as to en
danger the national finances, impair
the public credit, imperil the groat in
terests of other sections of the
they do not propose
by National action and legislation to
enforce the great right* guaranteed
by the amendments.
Tho Home of Irish not at all Enthu
astlc.
IowuUity Republican.
Springer, an attache of the
statistical ex­
the French govern­
ment, the annual cereal product of
F.urope averages
at present
4,'.104,000,-
bushels. Of this Russia furnishes
1,600,000,000
bushels, Germany
742,
500,000
bushels, and Austria
450,000,
000. Dr.
Edward Young, chief of the
bureau of statistics, Washington, es
timates the product of cereals of these
United States at about L,(00,000,000.
At this present writing tho United
States is the greatest grain producing
aud grain-exporting country of the
world. Since 18(7 we have been rap
idly driving our chief competitor,
Russia, from British and European
markets. In
1807 we
supplied Eng
land with but
14
per ccnt. of her total
imports of wheat, as against
44
187:1.
plied her with
44
against
per cent, in
21
With uudiminised resources of land
for the production of wheat and corn,
there would seem to be no conceiva
ble limit to our production and ex
port of both. Our machinery, rail
road system, and elevators enable us
to place grain on shipboard
sea
supplies
will
Sept.
wealth
I
have
no doubt that the President was gov
erned by patriotic motives, that he
acted upon his best judgment in a
critical affair, with full knowledge
that failure, if failure should come
would be most disastrous to his
to drink. They
fierce­
ly disputed which should drink first,
and were soon engaged in mortal
combat. Stopping suddenly to take
breath for a fiercer conflict, they saw
flying in tho distance some vultures,
waiting to feast on the one which
should fall first. They at ouce made
up their quarrel, Baying,
"It
to keep the
to
000
I'nion,
aud by gradual and steady steps de
prive the colored man of the boon of
citizenship, and possibly even seek to
throw
upon the nation the burden of
rebellion itself, which, if resisted,
will be made the excuse
for a renewal
in some form of the old conflict.
They have not forgotten their great
defeat and great losses.
States
Natioual Government cannot
within a State, use its
and
divide
parties on sectional lines created
by the past conflict. The spirit
and tutelage of the conflict are
not destroyed. It will reappear.
Great interests will often be
iu
peril
through fear, thus checking and re
tarding our National growth. Vis
ionary schemes and plans iu embryo
arc being made for taking millions
from the Treasury schemes involv
ing many millions are already
brought forward. The Democratic
party cannot be trusted with such
leadership, and with majorities thus
controlled, to take charge of our Na
tional affairs. They inherit in the
South theories of government at war
with the
spirit of the Nation. They
insist that the great question of the
protection of the citizen is a matter of
State concern.
/'MS,and
one or two others conceived the idea of
tendering a serenade to tho Demo
cratic candidate for Governor, and
accordingly employed tho Social
Bund for the occasion. The band
played in front of the Express
and again
office
near tho Catholic church
in hopes of attracting a crowd, but
when they arrived at the residence
of
John
P.
the managers were much
chagrined to discover not more than
forty in attendance. We were not
present but were informed by those
who wore that the number present
would not exceed forty. Our Demo
cratic friends
don't seem
to enthuse
over the nomination.
Ex-rebel Gen. Mosby called upon
the President yesterday, and com
plained that, in the distribution of
Federal patronage iu Virginia, the
President confined it to two classes
First,
to ox-Union
soldiers, which
was
all right and second,
to
ex-Con-
fedoratcs who never became recon
ciled, and who voted for Tilden last
November, which wa*
all wrong,
tyosby said that
20.000 EX-Con
feder
ates in Virginia voted for Hayes,and
that not one had received a Federal
appointment, while many who had
voted for Tilden, and done all they
could to make it unpleasant for their
coinradeB who voted for Hayes from
a conviction of duty, had received
good positions. The President said
lie had no intention of discriminating
in this way, and would give the mat
ter attention.
A
ton Special.'
"had
he been President instead of General
Planing Mill Burned.
BOSTON,
Sept.
4.—li. C.
wheat and corn
011
long conversation
regarding the condition of affairs in
Virginia then ensued, and the Presi
dent made numerous notes during
the
talk—Chieityo
bushels flour,
bushels
Tribune Washing,
year.
Huntress &
Cos. planing mill, at Stoneham, is
burned. Loss $25,000 insured for
$10,000.
15 per
ccnt. less than can be done in the ports
of Russia. For over twenty-five
years past the millions of Europe have
looked confidently to this country for
cheap food when short of breadstuff's.
From present appearances it would
seem that tho United States can hence
forth control to a large extent the
grain markets of Europe. Russia and
Turkey have heretofore furnished
22.0
per cent, of the supplies required
by Kngland. The gigantic war in
which tho.so nations are engaged must
naturally cause an increased demand
for American breadstuff's. In India
famine prevails this
year.
subject to
Egypt,
tho suzerainty of
will be affected
war,
the Porte,
by the Russo-Turkish
and whether tho
war BO confined
to the present combatants,or whether
it draws into it other European pow
crs,
it
is evident that the demand for
American breadstuff's will be in
creased in the neighborhood of
25
per cent, in the case ot the cutting off
of the Russian and Turkish supplies
from market, and the war at present
doe9 not promise to be of short dura
tion. Italy draws large supplier from
Russian and Turkish grain centres on
the Black
create an active demand
for our breadstuff's in Italian, French,
and other Mediterranean ports.
For the
last,
four years we have
bushels in
Ad­
ministration. Infallibility is not given
to Presidents. They are chosen from
the body of the people, generally for
their wisdom and experience. But
they all make mistakes and commit
blunders, as do other men. Repub
licans can gather wisdom from one of
the fable*of vEsop. He relates that
on a summer's day when the great
beat induced a general thirst, a lion
and a boar came at the same moment
to
vo
Britain only
ex­
ported wheat flour, and Iudian corn
to the average value of more than
one hundred million dollars per an
num. Though our exports of raw
cotton—tho great American staple—
exceed by nearly two-thirds in value
the combined exports of wheat, flour
and Indian corn, tho ratio of increase
is
enormously iu favor of the latter
articles. If wc look
at
1, I87»I,
regret
to the
of tho country, while the in­
creased exports of raw cotton only
realized
$2,020,037.
The exports of
wheat from all United States ports to
all foreign countries increased from
14,5!L7,5Si)
1808
bushels in
to
years ending June
52,(iil7,:i'.HI
1870.
During the
five
30, 1870,
tho total
grain exports have increased from
a!'.,U:S,1W
125,1159,001
an average of
1,320,00!',000
erage of
bushels. On
44,741,371,
the total corn
crop of the United States in
1875 was
excess
is
absorbed by breweries and distille
ries all over the world, which
do
price of breadstuUs
at a high figure than anythiug else
The demand for foreign food is
constantly increasing in England.
Some valuable statistics recently sub
mitted
tho Manchester Statistical
Society by Mr. Stephen Bourne, of
her majesty's customs,show that each
member of the community now con
siinios to the value of two and a half
times
as
much foreign food as he did
twenty years back, and that the total
cost of such food in the past twenty
years has been over
£2,000,000,000
($10,000,000,000).
The true index to
what this means is found in the quan
tities, rather than the values, because
prices are to some extent deceptive,
being liable to inflation or depression,
as the
case may
be. tho
£319,000,-
worth of imports imported into
Great Britain last year, one-half rep
resented food supplies—thus
£159,
000,0M
were for food,
£119,000,000
for raw material,and
£41.000,000 for
manufactured and miscellaneous ar
tides. During the
from
this country.
1870
were
20,000,000
000,000
35,000,000
They accept the
to
their wheat freely at
great power to
protect citizens of the
I'nitcd
bushels from
southeastern Europe, including
France.
Anticipating the future course
and
further rapid growth of this
trade,
British capitalists are now building
six of
the largest-si/.ed iron vessels
for the transportation of breadstuff*
from our shore ou English account.
We should
not only strain
every
nerve to meet the increased demand*
of Europe for 1roadstufI'S, but we
should also supply ships to carry
them. Tho aggregate wheat crops
of Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin and
Kansas for the year
1S77
117,-
bushels, against
1S70,
40,000,000
bushels."
Assuming that the farmers
Making all
reasonable allowance for unforseen
contingencies, we
that they will receive an increase of
say
75
per ccnt. in money value over
last year. At no former time in the
history of Oregon as an agricultural
state
has the prospect for
5,500,000
and
9
OFFICIAL DISPATCHES
State tint 8«TMI
ThoQuuid
Turku
Bit the Dost at Hchlpka
Pass.
Three Thenaand Being Piled
ITp
In One Place.
At1,000,000 Fire In NewYerk
—One Hundred Lives Re
ported Logt.
CSX-PrealdentThiers,of
per
Meantime, Russia sup­
1867, as
per ccnt in
1873.
PrMte
Dead.
FOREIGN.
IV ASIA.
LONDON,
Aug.
31.—A
toward Sukum-Kaleh. Gen. Acbha*
off's crossed the river Kellcsuri on
the
8th inst. Ilia
advance guard oc
cupied Agmcschagown.. The advance
column of General Bibitscli'S forces
from the river Manicha arrived on
the 21th at the village of Seibeldin
skor.
The Turks having received rein
forcements, are fortifying Sukum
Kaleh and
the neighboring heights.
A BATTLE.
On tho 2Sth three Turkish columns
made a fresh attack upon our troops
front and flank. Notwithstanding
their immense superiority in nymbcrs
the Turks were repulsed' after a five
hour's engagement with a loss of
400
men. The Russian losses were insig
nificant.
IN HITROPR.
Prince Tchcrkaski ha*
Ali
villa
A
bushels, while, on au av­
2(i,:'.81,558,
crop reached
the total wheat
2!)2,130,000
bushels.
In order, however, to appreciate
the advantage of the United States as
a grain-growing country,
its
4
is better
for us to make friends than to be
come the food of crows and vultures."
Lot us imitate their example that we
may not become food for the vultures
of the Democratic party.
popula­
tion should be taken into account—
40,000,000
of people producing
40
bushels per head. Europe, with a
population of not quite
300,000,000,
produces only
10
Russia,
bushels per head
20
bushels per head,and
Groat
bushels per head. As
the average quantity of grain con
sumed per head is
15
bushels, we pro
duce nearly throe times as much as
we require Russia scarcely twice its
wants Europe, on an average, all
needed, but Great Britain not much
over one-fourth. It will be seen that
the general production far surpasses
the consumption, but this
commanded the
Turks in person, and attacked the
Russians at throe points. So far tho
Turks arc
successful.
A
the failure of those
Constantinople dispatch says
Mehemet
Ali
telegraphs that Thurs
day morning a strong column of our
troops from llasgrad Surinassonaple
attacked the village of Marahahas
soulez. The fighting was desperate
The
was
eral times,
the natural
percentage of increase,estimating the
value of exported cereals
at $100,000.
(K»0,
roughly stated, as against
$1(!1,-
000,000
of cotton for tho year ending
we find that, as com­
pared with tho previous year, the in
rensed exports of wheat, flour, and
corn added last year
$18,15:14,448
taken and retaken sev
but it was finally carried
by the Turks. The enemy
was
de­
feated and retreated in disorder,
pursued by our troops. About five
o'clock in tho eveninganotlier column
crossed and forced the enemy to aban
doned IIaydarayaz and fall back on
Pop. My headquarters are at Sckara,
from whence
1
proceed to-morrow to
join Ahmed Kyoub Pasha, who is en
camped at Karahassaler. Tho troops
engaged at Karahassaler were the
Kasgrad and
Fski-Djuma
Divisions.
Wo captured one cannon, four amu
nition wagons,
2,000
rifles, a large
quantity of uniforms and military
equipments. Baker Pasha greatly dis
tinguished himself. We lost
800
killed and wounded the Russians
4,000.
[NOTE.—Karohassauler and Hnid
arayaz seem to be identical with Kar
asan and Ilardarkai on the map. Pop
doubtless means Popsker, where, ac
cording to previous telegrams, the
Russians have a strong defensive po
sition.]
Shumla dispatch saysthe fighting
lasted nine hours. The
ried by the Turks
positions
car­
011
the right bank
of the Lom arc Telifeler Spahilar and
Karahaussaulo.
Osman l'asha telegraphs from Plev
na on the 30th that a Turkish recon
Roitering that day defeated the Rus
sian cavalry near Illicsad. A hundred
Russians were killed.
AX F.NOI.ISII STRIKF.
LONMOV, Sept.
1.—A
ton yesterday.
rious Russian defeat on the Lom
Both correspondents agreo that Po
poko has been abandoned and the
Kussia position completely turned.
The Turks are continuing the pur
suit.
Baker Pasha, under whom the
Turkish cavalry charge
was made,
aud who had two horses shot,in, with
Captain Boriscol, one of his stall',
re
ported missing.
HON. E. K. NOYES ALIHIVKS IN FRANCE.
PARIS,
Sept. 1.—Hon. Edward F.
Noyes recently appointed
call.
past
Fort
may safely estimate
abundant
harvests of grain of all kinds been so
bright as at this season. It is
esti
mated that the surplus of breadstuff's
this season will be
from 25 to :!0 per
cent, greater than in
1875-0.
With a
largely increased acreage, there will,
from present appearances, be a sur
plus of at least
bushels over
above requirements for
home
consumption. California, whence
late year* a steady stream of grain
has poured out, spreading not only
among tho islands of the Pacific aud
the continents watered by its waves,
but extending
to the
Atlantic and
Mediterranean, will probably pro
duce this year
12,000,000
bushels of
wheat less than last year.
With a greater acreage than ever
before, the coru crop of the United
States promises to be unprecedented.
Throughout the northwest the corn
crop,as a whole, requires rain,
yet it
is not HUtiering.
The agricultural situation at the
present writing may be summed up
in a few words. In no state east of
the Kocky Mountains is there a fail
ure of any crop—on the contrary, ev
erything points to a surplus of wheat,
corn,oats, rye and barley. It is not
believed that the farmers of the
northwest will market their grain at
present prices. The total
(including
Iudian meal)from the
3,343,005
B.
L)uke
ten years the
growth of imports has been most
rapid in articles of food. Of the
53,
390,524
cwt.. of wheat imported into
the United Kingdom from Sept.
1,
1875,
to Aug.
31, 1870,20,882,115
went
The imports of
maize into the United Kingdom in
80,000,000bushels,
ing about
00,000,000
Wash-
bnrno, had an interview yesterday
with Duke Decazes, Minister of For
eign affairs to
whom
the former pre
sented a copy of his credentials and
Washburne A copy
of his letter
of re­
Decazes received both
gentlemen with great cordiality. He
expressed regret at Washburne's de
parture and warmly welcomed Noyes,
who made a suitaide reply in which
he congratulated himself upon enter
ing into relations with a Minister
who had always shown great sympa
thy for Americans, and with a coun
try bound by
so
many ties to the
LONDON-, Sept.
compris­
but the men stood it nobly. The Rus
sians, who
at
As
Russian offi­
cial dispatch of yesterday says
Russian troops continue to
been re
moved from the administration of
Bulgaria.
Tho expected battle along the line
of the Lom from Aghaslar to Tarlake
begun yesterday and continued all
day. Mohemet
U.
AN ENGLISH FAILURE.
1.—Ellas
$300,000.,
The Standard
from the United
the efllux of gold for the United
States, whirh
was thought probable,
we
learn there
ket from
out the
foot up
are no orders in mar­
that quarter,
officers and
01,000,000
in
while the aggregate wheat crop*
of Michigan,Indiana, hio,Kentucky
and Tennessee will exceed the aggre
gate of last vear by probablv from
will
ceive the enormous sum of
States.
sell
90
cents
and it is be­
lieved that exchange between
necessity of
Goitxv
New
York and this country will be bal
anced
by the
export of bonds with
sending gold.
SRRIIK.N,
Sept.
sued.
3.—The
lowing official statement has
fol
been is­
The Russian loss on the 31st
of August was at lvahidika seven
killed and :0 wounded at
Ilelisat,
30
1,020
soldict'Bkilled
and wounded. The Turkish loss
ON
(in the
country), these figures show that in
the nine states the farmers
will re
$80,100,000
more for their wheat crop of 1877
than for that of
1870.
!B
enormous. Near the village of Ilel
isat alone,
3,((00
dead bodies were
counted on the 31st ult.
Cannonading between Rustchuk
aud Giurgevo is continued. No loss
or
damage,
our side is expected.
Apiti ANOI'LK,
Sept.3.—Iutellligcnco
received from Schipka Pass state*
that
Suleiman Pasha has gained
a
more advantageous position for his
batteries 011
the heights surrounding
Nicholas. Russian reinforce­
ments arrived during
the night.
TUB TURKS L.OSK
The Porte has ordered
tification of
of
L'asha,
by the
exports
of
flour and
I'niteil
States
for the fiscal year endiug June
1877,
:I0,
were as follows Wheat,
40,325,-
barrels
total reduced to bushels of wheat,
57,013,9:10
corn,70,800,983 corn meal
447,907
barrels total reduced to
of corn,
72,052,011—making
grand total of
a
129,095,547
against
bushels,
125,959,001 for
the previous
C. L. Davenport 'Dead.
CANTON,
Pa., Sept. 1.—E. L. Daven­
port died about noon. He passed a
night of extreme agony.
The
road to Gabrova is commanded by
Turkish batteries.
7,000
AT SCHIPKA
L'ASS.
CONSTANTINOPLE, SepL
LONIKIN, Sept.
3.—The
Turks acknowledge the loss of 7,000
men in Schipka Pass. Two thous
and wounded readied Adrlanople,
yesteiday.
3.—The
reported to have
Russian* are
evacuated
that the for­
Adrianoplc
be completed
before winter, and has decided that
they
SHALL conhi&t
ot
fort*.
21
detached
TURKISH ACCOUNT.
CAMP OF THE TI KMSII AIIHY Or-
I'OSITE POI'KOI,
UuUiAKIA, Aug.
Evening.—I
30—
have just witnessed a
victorious engagement for the Turk
ish arms from tho heights opposite
Popkoi, on the
river
LOM.
The bat­
tle commenced in the morning with
a forward movement of the division*
of Mejid Pasha, who commanded the
Turkish right, and Fuad Pasha and
Sabid
whose divisiojia fuiflied
the center and
left.
THK AtlVANCE
force*under Medjid was made
in gallant style, the men taking open
order and skirmishing as tliey near
ed the Russian position. The ad
vance was well covered by tho
on
first met the oncoming
rush of Turks with great bravery,
wore soon forced to yield. They
were driven precipitately down the
heights commanding the vallev of
the Lom with great los*. Meanwhile,
Sabid Pasha attacked tho Baschilsler,
lofty hill crowned by a three-gun
Russian
battery. It required a
brilliant dash to carry this
position, but it
omplished,
might bo expected,
The
advance
very
difficult
wa* successfully ac-
the guns silenced and
captured, and the Russians killed or
drivon back in headlong haite. The
attack, indeed,had been succeuful at
all points, and the troops ahouted
"ALLAH! AI.LAH!"
with a fierce enthusiasm that told of
their elation.
A
general advance was now order
ed, and. in
a short time, the bridge
over the Lom was reached, and the
Turks crossed,unopposed, to the left
bank. The villages on that side,
which were held by the Russian*,
were soon captured, and were short
ly after to be seen in flame*. The
Russians now evacuated Popkoi.
this victory
hascreatod the wildest enthusiasm
throughout the whole army.
THE RUSSIAN ACCOUNT.
LONDON,
Sept. 3, 1877.—A corres-
pondent with the Czarowitch's army
says of Thur*day'S battle:
"General
Leonoff, who commanded at Karasan
had about
3,000
infantry,
500
and ten guns.
cavalry
NO
leas than
Turks formed the advance. It was
odds
of six to one for eight hours HE
fore the Russians left the village, aud
firing
was almost continuous durinf
the whole day. After the Turks
hac.
entered a portion of the village the
Russian infantry
hold their ground
for two hour*, awaiting reinforce
ments. At length
300
came,and two
hours more of hot firing ensued, dur
ing which the Turks were continual
ly being
reinforced by masses of
troops. It was long since certain
that we must loose our position, but
the retreat did not begin fairly
too
many." General Leonoff* and his
staff were indefatigable in their exer
tions. When the retreat began it was
an ugly one. From one little rise to
another we went each time, until the
fire was too hot for us, and at last
when a
great
body of
centration is impossible, first from
want of troops, and second,
on ac
count of the great distances and nar
row roads. Our present position is
an admirable one. We stand, of
coursc, strictly on the defensive."
This correspondent estimate* the
Kussians at
5,000
in the battle.
speedily
strike of
cotton operatives commenced
10,000
at Bol­
A RUSSIAN 1BFF.AT.
LONDON,
tho daily
Sept. 1.—Later editions of
YEWS
LONDON, Sept. 4.—A correspondent
telegraphs that it would be impossi
ble to convey an idea of the grief and
consternation which prevails at the
death of Thiers, this morning. The
news spread
like wildfire and even
at an early hour, although tho weath
er was very inclement, the streets of
Paris were
filled
groat cxcitement.
U. S.
Min­
ister to France, accompanied by his
predecessor, Hon. Elihu
with people in
Some were actual­
ly shedding tear* and giving vent to
feelings of grief and apprehension,
the death ot Thiers just now being
regarded by all as a national calami
ty. Thiers had been staying, the last
few week*, at the Pavillion, llenri
tjuatrc street, Germain en Laye, and
had caught a slight cold, but nothing
that led to the anticipation of his
death.
Another correspondent says his
death has made a deep impression in
political circles. The conservatives
think it assures them success at tho
elections. Great consternation pre
vail* in the republican camp.
THE "THUNDERER'
LONDON, Sept. 4.
ers yesterday and
heedlessness of the
Gaakell,
cottou spinner, has failed liabilities
says with
respect to
WANTS PEACE.
-The
Times lead-
to-day show the
present war, its
excessive costliness iu men and mon
ey
far
out weighing its possibilities
for good
and the danger of eventual
Russian failure. From all of which
the Times concludes that the present
moment is propitious for intervention
and Germany aud England ought to
take the initiative
to
truce.
brinjf about a
SUKEM KALEH EVACUATED.
SATOUM, Sept. 4.—Tho Turks have
completely evacuated Sukom Kaleh.
THE BATTLE OF I'ELISAT.
LONDON, Sept.
4.—A
correspondent
at Paretin telegraph* "I rode over the
battle field of Pelisat. The Turks
left very few wounded and only
about
300
dead on the field. Their
losses could be better judged by the
number of
knapsacks with which the
ground
was strewn. In front of the
Russian trencheB, half way between
Pelisat and Zagalince the Turkish
dead were lying so close that they
might have shaken hand* with the
Russian* lying inside. It was a des
perate attack and a desperate resis
tance. The attack seem* to have been
well directed. It was made
*o
sud
denly and violently that the Russian
redoubt was taken almost by surprise
the first time. It wa* in fact taken
almost before Gen. Zotaff knew the
attack had begun. It would have
been much better
for Gen.
have retreated and drawn the Turks
out into open country where their
inaptness at executing maneuver* on
the field of battle would have put
thein
at great disadvantage with the
well drilled Russian troops.
A RUSSIAN VICTORY.
LONDON, Sept
Selvi.
cial dispatch dated Gorny Stnden at
7 :35
this a. tn. says Iovatz wa* yester
day carried by assault by Russian
troops under Generals Merotinsky
and Skobeloff.
-9
Public Debt Statement.
WASHINGTON, Sept.
1.—The
amount with
guns
of the Turks, who took advantage of
the frequent elevations
of
the coun­
try to push their batteries forward to
points where they could not only help
the infantry but make hot work for
the Russian batteries
the heights
bevond. On the sides the artillery
practice was excellent. Medjid
and
his men soon pushed their way to the
village of Karahassankoi, when
the
signal to charge was given,and, with
a rush, they were over the Russian in
trenchments on the hill.
THE SLAUGHTER WAS TERRIBLE ON THE
TURKISH SIDE
during this part of the engagement,
BRIOHAMB BURIAL.
PREIHMILMI W
riaai the
ST.
ery stable,
.T.
Frees
Circassians hov­
ered upon our right flank in the maize
fields below, our
Cossacks and
killed and wounded
THIERS DEAD.
LONDON, Sept. 4.—Theattack which
carriod off ex-President Theirs was
what is called in France apoplexic
faudruoyante. He was apparently
in good health in the morniug and
took his usual walk after lunching,
lie lelt symptoms of
&
hus­
sars were sent down to meet them.
Our position finally yielded, and we
straggled back to Gagovo. Such of
the wounded as could manage to
crawl away did so, while the infan
tryinen bore back others on their
rifles. Wo gave up our horses to
wounded officers,and finally gathered
a few hundred of us at the foot of a
hill along the winding road which
leads to Karasan. The result of the
loss at Karasan is not important tin
less tho enemy succeeds in forcing the
heights we now hold. The Czaro
witch's army is necessarily divided
into
small masses at different places
along the whole line of front from
Giurgevo to
glish, Hall
Water
kinson, Harris
CO,
Tirnova. Speedy con
illness which
developed into
lit.
died at six
so
aud Standard publish
dispatcher from their correspondents
who wore eye wituessesof Thursday's
battle, which confirm in detail
a
se­
an apoplectic
He remained unconscious
o'clock,
and
apparently with­
out pain. No event short of a coup
d'etat or a communist rising could
have created so profound an impres
sion throughout France. Its
effect
on the present political crisis cannot
yet be properly weighed. Gambetta
is now without a rival
in the republi
can party, but hi* advanced views
are
alarming to the left center that
the republican party, as a whole, will
probably seek to counteract Thiers
removal by putting forward Grevy,
ex-president
of the Chamber of Dep
uties, as a candidate for the
succes
sion to the presidency in the event of
President MacMahon'S retirement.
PWWSISD
Pttfktt
SALT LAKE, Aug.
31.—The
body of
Brigham Young will lie in state from
9 a. M.
to-morrow until
11
a.
M.
Sun­
day when the funeral will take place.
His
body has been embalmed and
will be buried in tho vault of hi* pri
vate cemetery near his late residence.
Special trains will come hero on all
the railroads. An immense concourse
of people is expocted. The govern
ment of the Mormon Church has pass
ed into the hands of twelve Apostles,
ten of whom will bo present at the
fbneral. Two of them, Jos.
F.
and Orson Pratt,are in Kngland. It
i*
not likely there
Democrat special from Paris, Texa*,
says that
a fire broke out about 1 p.
in the City Saloon, and spread
rapidly on the east, west and south
side of tho public square, until about
ten blocks of business houses and
dwellings were consumed, including
three hotels, the postoffice, telegraph
and express
office*.
at from
011C
20,000
PA
11
is,
until
4. The fighting having commenccd
at 8
in the morning, wheu, from all
along the line, came suddenly back
exhausted infantrymen. The only
remark passed was,
"There are
Loss estimated
$1,000,000
to
$1,500,000.
Many
families are without shelter.
Several lives are reported loBt, but
only
body has yet been found.
It is eaid that a man named Taylor
set fire to the City Saloon by pouring
oil on the floor and igniting it with a
match. lie said he would
"burn
the
damned town." He was arrested and
lodged in jail.
There was but one fire engine in
town and the water gave out,leaving
the city at the mercy of the flames,
The particulars of the fire are very
meagre. No insurance given
Texas, Sept. 1.—About one
o'clock p. m. a lire
broke
out which
spread rapidly, burning the east, west
and south sides of
*the
square on
Clarksville street from the square to
Pine Bluff street and from the square
to and including the postofficc. The
losers are the Farmers' and Mer
chants' bank, Liloed House,Postofflco
express office, Barm
&
Greshams liv
T.
W.&
A. S.
Johnson,
Cohn, Harrison and Co.,
Co.,
N.
J.
Goodgion
J.
Faulkner, Lewis
Bros., Denton Bros., City Hotel,
Gleseon'S stable,
MC
,1. W.
Craig,
Rogers,
II. L.
W. B,
Bairteb, Whitfield
Douglass, Williams
&
Cohn, 2nd store,
Wortham,
N
A, S.
Murry,
&
&
Co.,
N.En
Brader,
E. V.
Saunders,
W. W.
Sems,
J. D.
&
theripore, 8. Fox & Co., J. D.
M.
Saunderp,
W. R.
&
Jno. Gabbett,
ons
Nix
At­
Co., dry goods,
A1
Coum
.1. E.
Bros.,
Combs, Bright
Fittzpatrlck,Edmondson
Meyer. John Wyatt,
H,
Harris
note to the State Savings for that
amount. Finally lie gave the State
enough shares of stock to liquidate
his matured note to that institution
and callcd himself square with the
world.
The books are full of crooked trans
actions, and there is hardly a day
where the assistant cashier did not
force
a baianco to indicate that the
hank had more money than it really
had.
In all dealings the forms of law
seem to have been observed,and it is
doubtful if the ofl'cnso is an extradit
able crime.
All the other bank*
stroyed.
Zotaff to
4.—A Russian
employes of the C.
ofli
public
debt statement shows a decrease of
$3„809,538
the past month currency
•11
,828,537 special fund for redemp
tion of fractional currency,
$8,265,412
special deposit
of
legal tenders for
redemption of certificate* of deposit
$50,430,000
coin
$106^04,936
coin
certificates $38,525,400 outstanding
legal tenders
$357,070,164..
The
held for payment of
military establishments, not appro
priated
by
Congress, is $4,500,000.
Another Bavlnge Bank in Trouble.
BOSTON, Sept.
1.—Sandwich
ings Bank has been declared insolv
ent. The tota) amount of deposit* in
the bank are about
$1,000,000.
ter from
$40,000
not be able to continue.
CINCINNATI, Sept.
are doing
about
their usual business to-day.
A Meandering Mlnd-A Strange
Story from Sedalla, Mo.
SKDAI.IA, Mo., September
1.—The
Sedalia Democrat will to-morrow
contain a long article, the following
of which are the leading points In
May,Ls70,Hon.
S. S.
Land Office, suddenly disappeared,
and notwithstanding a
most
Angry Clements
A**AT
STOItM
AT I.EVKI.AI®,
'©MRIFLRLANI),
Aug.
LONIMIN, Aug.
Great Fire in New York.
100
&
F. II.
&
&
Frees, Ly­
Harrison, Lemi* Bros.,
Luck, Gridens Hotel,
A. B,
II.
Friedlander,
Co., Gray's wagon yard anc
others. Many private dwellings, of
fices and trade shops are not included
in the above area, making about ten
solid blocks destroyed. The old
Court House was also burned. Many
families are without shelter. Some
lives arc reported lost. Only one
body found as yet.
The Chicago Savinge Institution
Swindle
CHICAOO, Sept.
1.—The
of
depositors and left them instead
$3,000,000
less than
$1,000,000,
the
hands
LIVES LOST.
NKW YORK,
Sept. 3.—It is reported
that one hundred lives have been lost
in a fire at Tenth avenue and 36th St.
A MILLION DOLLAR FIRE.
NEW YORK, Sept.
3.—J.
nelly's barrel factory,
Smith
south,
J.
will be_ another
President of the church appointed for
some time.
A Big Blaze
TEN BLOCKS BURNT BY AN
tire engine
IWCKNDIABY.
Loins, Aug. 31.—The Globe-
350
liurdette, United
States Commissioner
less and
of the General
thorough
search, nothing of his whereabouts
could be learned. All his accounts
were found to be correct, and it was
supposed by manv that he had com
mitted suicide. Yesterday, a well
dressed and distinguished looking
man was observed passing up and
down on Fourth street acting in a
strange manner, at last he called on a
friend and told his name. Wheu
questioned as to where he had beon
for tho past two years, he replied that
he did not know. It is thought tho
presence of his family and proper
treatment will restore his reason.
31.—The most
severe storm ever known here passed
over the
city this forenoon, accompa
nied by lightning, wind and hail.—
Several roofs were blown off, trees
broken off' and uprooted, and other
property damaged.
31.—A
severe
At Park
TLIUN'
deratorm visited the city this fore,
noon, and busines* wa* entirely sus.
pended.
Hill
two horses
were killed by lightning and a house
partly demolished. Several barns
were burnt in the same vicinity.
DAMAOE AT ST. LOL'IS.
JEFFERSON BARRACKS,
—A storm
Mo., Aug.
31.
of wind and rain passed
over the St. Ixiuis arsenal this after
noon and did considerable damage to
the public storehouses.
A large
read before adjournment
Sav­
Tho
present difficulty is due to shrinkage
in value of property on which mort
gages to the amount
of
are
held. The exact condition of the
bank cannot be ascertained for sever
al days, but it is feared that
it will
•has BOA* KR *lek.
1—Simeon Gar­
net, the negro who committed rape
upon the person of Mrs. Perry Kin
geer, wife of
a farmer
por­
tion of beautiful ornatnental trees
upon the
parade ground were
de
A Compromise.
CINCINNATI, Aug.
31.—The
freight
II. & D. R. R.
had
a lengthy conference to-day with
President Shoemaker, resulting iu
the modification of his order requir
ing men to run ninety miles to make
a day's work. Shoemaker modified
the order to meet the suggestion of
the mcu, requiring way freight to run
sixty miles and through freight cighty
milos.
There 1* no changc in the situation
among the striking cigar maker*, ex
cept a combination among manufac
turers,
who threaten
works unless the
turn to work. This action lias been
taken to prevent the striker* from re
ceiving aid from those working.
Dlebanded.
WASHINGTON,
The Ohio Striker*.
CINCINNATI, Sept.
P. Hates'
piano factory on West 35th street was
entirely destroyed by fire this morn
ing. It is rumored that ton persons
perished in the flames. The tire ex
tended to the south side of the
street,
destroying the entire block between
10th and 11th avenues also
M.
was
Con­
J.
o'S silk factory, and
Graham
&
scvorai houses
Walker's charcoal factory
north of 35th street and a block of
frame houses on Tenth avenue be
tween 35th and 36th street*.
A
burned, the firemen
being unable to get it away.
The Post says the factories and oth
er buildings named in 35th street,
were reduced to ruins in about three
quarters of an hour. The firemen
mado every exertion possible but
lack of water constantly hindered
their efforts. Thcv succeeded before'
noon, however, in getting tho fire
der control,although it was then still
burning fiercely in some buildings.
They fell from time to time with a
heavy crash. In the confusion
and many persons place the
amount at a much higher figure. It
is reported that many lives are lost.
Rumors on this point are very con
flicting. It is probable that some
workmen in the piano factory were
unable to escape, but the number ia
not yet known by any one. The fire
is believed to have broken out in the
fifth
story of the building and it i*
known that some workmen in the up
per stories had great
difficulty in es
caping. One workman named Ed
ward Packmaster jumped from the
upper window and died in a few
minutes.
A few
to
40
and
deeper in
vestigators go into the accounts of the
State Savings Institution the more
patent does it become that its officers
have systematically plundered its
15,000
and
that sum is not readily convertible
into cash.
Neither Spencer, Guild or Bulklcy
have been
heard
from, but a rumor
comes from New York, apparently
well founded,
that Spencer sailed
front New York on the steamship
Wisconsin, of the Guion Line, for
Liverpool on the same Tuesday that
the bank passed into
of the
assignee. Spencer's transactions are
worthy of brief record.
The family held stock in the Cook
County National Bank and was con
nectcd with it before its failure. He
got out of that bank, borrowed mon
ey, gave in lieu thereof his note to
tho bank and with the proceeds
bought enough shares in the State
Savings to become principal share
holder. He then borrowed nearly
half a million dollars from the State
Savings to liquidate his matured noto
at the Cook
to
Co. Bank, and gave his
100
and weak.
TIN*
other workmen
whose names arc not ascertained were
seriously injured.
A
workmen per
ished in the piano factory. Three
alarms
were sent
out in rapid sue.
cession and a large forco of firemen
engines and trucks responded to the
calls. The firemen were obliged to
keep at considerable distance from
the burning buildings on account of
heat. It is probable, however, that
they could have prevented the fire
from spreading if they had had sulfl
cient water. Tho hydrants supplied
only scanty streams and some became
entirely drained. The row of brown
stone apartment houses on the south
side of Fifth street, east of the facto
ry, burnt rapidly. Their Inmates
were able
to
save
little
at 54
property,
number of shanties on the other side
of the street were also consumed.—
The establishment of
AVest 35th
W. B. Brown,
street is gutted,
strong wind which veered from point
to point, whirled sparks and frag
ments of burning material in all d"
rections. Sparks were blown to 10th
avenue and sot fire to a number of
frame buildings occupied
as
403
men at work in
the top story, said the alarm
Ri\T*«II
PRE'
vailing it was impossible to obtain
any details of losses and very diffi
cult to make even
an approximate es
timate of the total amount of loss.
The lowest estimate of the latter is
$1,000,800,
stores
and dwellings, and three structures
at
44!)
inclusive, burned
Some of tho occupants succeeded
removing part of their furniture to
to
the street, but most of it was dc
stroyed.
LATER.
A telegram
says
there is no hope
thata vestige of tho block bonnded
35
and
30
by
streets and 10th a 11th ave­
nue will be loft. The school house of
35th street is already entirely des
troyed and tenement houses on the
four sides of the block are in ruins.
Sparks from the burning buildings
lighted upon the canvass roof of the
Gospel Tent and it was destroyed.
The conviction i* growing that the
loss of lifo will be serious and several
ambulances arc iu the neighborhood.
One authority says there must be from
75
bodies buried in the ruins.
Another statement is that some
:10
25
to
girls employed in tho upper story
of Hates' factory have perished. Am
bulances havo removed
18
or
20
wounded, who jumped from the
burning factory. Still another state
ment is that of the
150
to
200
men in
the factory at the time of tho fire
comparatively few escaped death or
fatal wounds. The occupants of
houses in 30th street could distinctly
see
workmen in the piano factory
making futilo efforts to escape from
the roof and upper stories and could
hear their shrieks for assistance. Au
gust Varrath, varuishcr in the facto
ry and one of the
45
was giv­
en to them by a workman who had
put his head out of the window and
saw smoke issuing from tho window*
below. The foreman urged the men
to keep cool, saying there
was proba
bly plenty of time for oscape. Var
rath says the men scattered in various
directions but lire and smoke drove
them back from the stairways. There
was a tire ladder at each end of the
building and also a chain fire escape.
Varrath got down by one of the lad
ders. He said that since his escape
he had not seen any of his fellow
workmen. Half the surgeon* of Bel
vuc hospital, police surgeons, and
coroners are ou duty at the fire.
About
families are rendered home
most
of their furniture
des­
troyed. While the fire was at its
hight a number of people on sheds
in
Phelan'S yard were thrown to the
ground and badly injured.
A
wo­
man jumped from tho window of a
tenement house on 37th street and
was instantly
killod.
Hates' piano
factory
was an exten­
sive establishment turning out about
100
piano fortes a week. The factory
was first erected about 6 years ago.
The wal!«
fell
AND
sons wore killod.
a number of per­
The New York Fire.
NEW YORK, Sept.
Post
4.—Tho
says
Evening
the scene of the great fire at
35tli street and 10th avenue yesterday,
was a wilderness of ruins. The burn
ed ate between 10th and 11th avenue,
extends from the middle of the block
on the north side of 34th street to
the middle of the block on north side
of 36th street. In addition, a num
ber of buildings were gutted or dam
aged ou tho west side of 10th avenue.
Ttio ruins resemble those of a burned
town. Tho blackcnod walls still
staud at irregular intervals, the space
between being covered by immense
piles of brick and fragments of iron
large and small, twisted and warped
out of all resemblance to the original
beams, girders, or macliinory.
Reports iu regard to the loss of life
by the flro are as conflicting
as yes
terday. Many persons still believe
that a large number of bodies will
finally be dug out
of the ruins of
Ilato'S piano factory. Others believe
the loss of life to be comparatively
slight. Among the latter is Capt.
Washburn,who think* the workmen
in the upper stories had time
to
es
cape to the roof of tho new factory
before the latter took fire and down
its stairways to the
street.
Oaman Pasha Is a Kentucky Man.
LOUISVILLE, K y
.,
was
to close their
men already out re­
Sept. 3.—The New
York Republican Association ad
journed sine die on Saturday, iu com
pliance with the President's order.—
The_ funds of tho Association, after
payiug all outstanding obligations,
were ordered to be turned over to the
Soldiers Home at Bath
field,
N. Y. A let­
A. M.
Clapp, of Buffalo, was
in which he
denounces the order of tho President
in severe terms. Mr. Clapp
waB late
public printer and in consequence of
extravagance in office, shown by an
investigating committee of the late
House of Representatives was retired
from the
public service, upon the in
coming or President Hayes, and Mr.
Defrees, the printer originally ap
pointed by Mr. Lincoln, wa* made
his succcasor.
1.—The
tee of freight men on
Hamilton
near Oxford,
Ohio, on Saturday last, wa* taken
out of jail, to-day noon, and shot
dead by a mob.
cemmit-
the Cincinnati,
&
Dayton
I{. R.,
who ac­
cepted a compromise with Pesident
Shoemaker, yesterday, are to-day con
ferring with strikers at Dayton^Ohio,
who refused to take out trains last
night, with a view of inducing them
to accept a compromise.
Sept. 4.—L.
R.
11.
Wicklitl'e writes the Courier^Tournal,
denyiug the story that Osman Pasha
is Marshal liaxaino. He says he knew
him when ho
was Colonol of a regi
ment of artillery during the rebel
lion, and has corresponded with him
since hebecamc a General in Turkey.
His name is
Clay Crawford.
He
General of a division in Mexico,
where he did good service for the
liberal government, but left on ac
count of a quaricl.
He then went to
Philadelphia, but becoming restless,
entered tho service of the Khedivo of
Egypt, and from thence was transfer
red to the Sultan.
Cerman Lutheran Synod
IOWA CITV, Iowa, Sept.
1.—The
Convention of tho Western District
German Lutheran Synod, of the Unit
ed States, is IN session here. The
ses
sion opened yesterday with an ad
dress by Rov.
(J.
Grossman, of Max-
Iowa, President of
the
Conven­
tion. The attendance is fair, repre
sentatives being present from all
state* of the district. The business
of tho convention will occupy five
days.
Nh««T IB lite iMIllIM
MOUNT WASHINGTON, Sept.
3.—A
heavy snow storm is now prevailing
hero. The thermometer
stand* at 31
degrees at the hotels at the base of
the mountains, where it is raining
hard.
TweedAgaln.
NEW YORK, Sept.
1.—Judge
Dona­
hue has granted a writ of Habeas
Corpus requiring Win.
M.
in
to ring operations from
T"
OanoAeo, Sept. 4.
[By Telegraph.1
Wheat—opened very unsettled, bat
closing firm and higher at $114
caafe.
1 043B Sept., and 101^ Oct., and ha*
sold at 102^ Sept.
Corn—firm ana a shade higher 4lo
cash, 43% bid Sept., and 44J^c bid
Oct.
Oat*—firm at 26c cash, and
Oct.
Barley—67c. Rye—54^c.
Pork—weak and lower 12 20 cmA)
and 12 27's Oct
Lard—easier $8 40 cash aad Oct.
Whisky—reported $109.
OKL LIN
steam
Qnoaeo, Sept. 4.
By Telegraph.]
Hogs—Receipt* 8,000 h?ad. Active
firm, and
[email protected] bigher. Light gra$M
are quotable at from $6 40050, while
heavy
are telling at from $4 8605 36.
Cattle—Receipt*
4,000 head. Dull
larket
Sept.
8*. Lovis, Sept A ,.t
By Telegraph.]
Wheat-higher. No. 2 $127ea«b^|F
26
No. 3 [email protected]
Corn—hotter at 40*^ *^C cash,an
41 \C. ()ct.
Oats—firmer
at 25)£§?£C.
Rye—quiet at 52c.
Whisky—steady
at $1 00.
Pork—dull at $12 75.
Bulk Meats—nominal.
Lard—nominal.
Live Hteek •ariiift,,
By Telegraph.]
ST. LOUIS,
Sept.
Hogs—Stronger at ft [email protected]
Receipts 1,000.
lew YAGFC •whet,
By Telegraph.]
5EW
woman is
known to have died during tho fire
Many persons in the neighborhood
believe that
20
YORK
Sept4»
Wheat—heavy. No. 2 winter raft
[email protected]\*.
Corn—dull. Mixed western M#
57
gc.
Barley—nominal.
Oats—steady. Mixed weitern 90A
39
c.
Pork—lea* active at $13 00.
Lard—easier at $8 87',' @90.
Whisky—$112^.
1,000,000 Bottles
9
....
•.•&.
m*am
CenfauB
LinimentS.
bbVctieMl sold T*~* —J Tfltn'Ht
has r«usl«1 n», that th9 have not doat all thst to
claimed for them. Indeed, MtnUtc aldll aetata*
go beyond the remit n-achad ia tkeaeWoadarffcl
preparations. Added to Carbolic, Arnioa, ll«a
tht, Seneca-Oil nod Wltch-Haxel, an ottMfla
Kredleau, which makea a fkmlljr UataeMlthat
daflea rivalry. Rheomatie aad bed-rtdd*a Clip
pie* have by it been enabled ta threw away ttatr
crutches, and many who An yean bait* baeaal*
Dieted with Neuralgia, Sciatica, Caked Bfaaati.
Weak Backs, Ac., have found perraaneaft idiaf.
Mr. Josiah Westlaka, of MarytrlUa, O., wTllM:
"For years my RhenmatlMl haa beaa eo had
that 1 have beea unabla ID stir from the laak I
have tried erery remedy I ootdd hear ac Itoally
1 learned of the Centaur UnlmaaL The *11C three
bottleseaabled Be to walk withont my uWilehse.
I
am mending rapidly. I think your Liniment
simply a marvel."
This Linimeut curaa Bona aad ScaUa wilhoat
a scar. Extracts the Potaon from bites aad atlas*
Cures Chilblains aad Froetad Feet, aad U Tery
efficacious for laiache. Toothache, Itch, aad Ca
Igneous Xruptions.
The Otaiin l.lalaisal, VeUew
Wrapper, Is Intended for the toagh tberv,
cord*
and muscles of hones, mule* and i
BKADI BEAD!
Rev. Geo. W. Ferria, Manor*Ul, SchohartiCo,
K. Y., fays:
"My horse was lame for a year with a Mlock
wrench. All remedies utterly failed to eara and I
considered blm worth It* until I rnninawil to
use Centaur Liniment, which rapidly oared him.
1 heartily recommend It."
It makes very little dUTeteaoe whether the eaNa
be "wrench." sprain, spavin, or laiaaaeaa of aay
kind, the effects arc the same. The fraat pawea
of the Liniment is, however, showa la M)-«fll.
Big-head, Sweeny, Spavla, Blng-boM, QaMa aad:
Scratches. This Liniment ia worth milMaaa of'
dollars yearly to the Stock-growera, Livery-Ben^
Farmera aad tlioae having valuable aataalfl to.
cere for. We warrant ita effect* aad latetOMqp
Farrier who has ever used It.
Iu«aaLToBT.or J. B. Boaa a Co.,
41 Dey street, Haw York.
Castoria.
A complete substitute
lor Caator OH, wltboat its
unpleasant taste or recoil In the thraat. ffesn
ault of 20 years' practice by Dr. Piteher,
of Massachusetts.
Pitcher s Caatorla la particularly recommended
for chil.iren. It destroya worms, aashallatas the
food aud allows natural sleep. Very eaoeatoua
In Croup, and for children Teething, For Colda,
Keverishness, Diaordera of the Bowels, Sad
stomach Complaints, nothing is so eSeotlve. It
is a.* pleasant to take as honey, coats but n*all_
uDd
CHU 1H'
had of any Druggist,
This ta one ol many testimonials:
"COHSWAM, Lebanon Co. Pa., March 17. ta
'Dear Sir—I have used your Caatorla la
practice for some time. 1 lake great ptaaMM* ki,
recommending it to tht profnaion as a itaaHsr
ble and agreeable medicine. It la liaiHalailai
adapted to children where the itpomshMfu
Castor Oil renders it so difficult luiEllltf
K. A..KaDKB^M, b.
Mothers who try Castoria will flnd
lt*'
they
can slei'p nights, and that their babtewlUb*
health
J.S,BOSa*CO., KtwTork.
avnanr
FIRST D08E^
ON A BOSTON F0LXQI OTflUll.
H.K.ST*™.:
B0W05''*»•*««.
Dear .Sir—In the spring of I8601 was stricken
down with fever, which had a long aad alaoM
IIOIH'ICHX run. The heat medical advice Mab
attendance, I was taken through the ferwTaak
it let me terribly reduced ana weak, with ex
cruriatiiin pains In my side, back aad Uaa I
was roinpletely prostrated with Kldaay Coa*
plalut, ami 110 medicine seemed to rwefcayeaaa.
In this couditioa I was persuaded to try Vaa
KTISK by a friend whom it cared rf the same
disease, and it seemed as though I ooald teal the
EFFECT
of the tint dou through
HIT WHO)# IJITTNI
And from that raotoent I hfipm to ibm4
ally growing batter from dij to day: aad I (o|
lowed on with the VRGP.TINE,
restored ma to health, «luce vlitck time il5w
been able to |*rfirin my duilet AA A polftto
offlvr, eujoying good health and few* It »o
doubt a bo nt tho great valiM U Vbmtui TA»
Kidney Complaint aud almllar dteMMfc.
I aiu. sir, rraoctfally, A
UfayKte fOttP,
ou
BradvifJ
All Diseases of the Boof*.
If VEOETIHE will relieve pala,eleaaea,pa
J#-
and cure AUI-II dUeuoi, rtatorlag tho potior
perfect health after trying different phflk iZJ?
availv reniedlee, aufTerlog for yoara. ".
conclusive prw.f, if you area sufferer, iu SZ
be cured.' Why is this medicine JMRF
such great eure«? It works Iu the MOOT
trcufHtiiii? rtuJ.l ir *.»»» ka
thia medlcioo
... It works la tho
oircurKiiitg fluid, it can truly bo 00' if*ai tkl
(IKKAT NWL PL LUKIEK HVGV?
of disease originates iu the blood: aiy ttTZ..'
leine that does not act directly upon it ujiourifV
and reuovate. haa any jiut claim uf rrSW
attention
purify
ptblio
Seventy-one Tears 'of Age.
MR. KTEvr.*A,T
MAMBF,ELD'*
Iear Sir—1 an aerenty-oo# year of
suffered mauy yearn with Kido «y
weakneaa iu IUV back aud stom*ch a
duced by friends to try your
think it the best tnedicioo for __
kidneys 1 over used. 1 havo triod
dies for this complaint, asdiiowfi^iih-a'A
relief as from the VCOKTIJIB.
ITSTNMTIMHAAD
invigorates the whole ayttom. MaoinC mvS.
jualutAiJo«s havo tak«n It, and 1 hotfloiolt In k*
good for all the complaint* for which U la
commended.
Yours truly, JOSIAH II.
Would Qlvi a Dollar for Dooa.
H. n. STKVKHa,
*-IITT sMIite* ahh Tli
ney complaint for ten yean: have a affiled
niy bach, liipa aad ride, with ml
dliHculty ini passing urine, which waa eftaa aad
lii very small quantities, frequently srrosna—led
with blood and excruciating vain. IhavaSS.
fully tried most ot the popafir leaenea I
mended for luy complaint: I have heaa aai
treatment of some of the meet akilfal
elans in Boston, all of whoaaproaamaad as)
incurable. This waa my coadltloa wk*a __
adviwd by a friend to try UM VKUTUI, aad I
could see the good effect* from the fliat do** I
took, and froai that atoaoeat I kept oa kapfovtae
unttf i was entirely cured, taking In aliTTahMld
think, about six bottlea.
It 1s indeed a valuable medicine, awl If I
should be afflicted again In the
sasoa way would
give a dollar for a doee. If I could not SSI 14
without.
Itespectfully, J. If. OIUL
301 Third St.. South BoetOtt,
Llf* Burtfwi.
BOSTOK, NOV.T.
H. R. STimra, Eeq..
Dear Sir—Prom a poor,
emaciated snfferar,
the
11"T,r?
Tweed to
appear before a Committee of Alder
men on Monday and testify
regard
1808
to
1870.
The Commission
WASHINGTON, Sept.
1.—Gen. A. G.
Lawrence, of Newport,
R. I., has ac­
cepted a position on the Sitting Bull
Commission, representing the Inter
ior Department.
ttis
pound* heavier than when I eommeacad the S
ofVBOBTIMB
1 will make mention that I wa* alio flat
eufferer from Kidney Complaint, cauataa 5*Sa?
elating pain through the small rtf tf. lack
nearly an of the time. This, too, VaMHBBMM
cured, aud 1 am now a perfect-*
•—I*L
and I will add, happlueae—all eaataa BOB A£
use of a few bottles of VKOETIKa.
Respectfully,
1 Union
VcoBTtHB It comooood oi ftnops Baikiai
iVkesU
P|""rltV"*«.eTawehtSS.
V«gttin« U solA b7 Braggists.
I IV I'SS
SET
tor IMIO
we. Fissts My Address.
»nn win csa.jp
Original Oraac*
gappl* Heeae,'~ If
1A
H* Valaah 4a*_ CltlOA

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