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The Detroit tribune. (Detroit, Mich.) 1935-1966, July 26, 1941, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92063852/1941-07-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
Westsiders Petition For Colored Teachers At Northwestern
Young Girl Cut When She Attempts
To Pass The Picket Lines At Bakery
A seventeen-year-old girl was injured when a group
ot boys and girls attempted to enter a bakery shop at 4748
Chene. last Friday afternoon. The girl was cut on the finger
during a melee in front of the bakery.
The injured girl is Miss Margaret Patterson, 17. of
527 E. Canfield.
relit p held Kriegar. 44.
white, of 9140 st. Cyril.
Miss Patterson, arrordinz to wit
nesses, with a group of sever, or
eight hova and girls, was return
ing from Northeastern High s, hool
where she is attending summer
classes. The youngster*- arriving
at the hakery, started,} in to buy
some cookies.
As they attempted to ent>-r the
hakery they were warned by pickets
of the Baker s I'nion, Antrrb an
Federation of Labor, noj to enter
the «hop a« it was under pokot.
When the girls refused to heed the
warning of the pickets a fight
sorted.
Miss Patter-on told polio that
she was rut du :nz the flzhr re
tiring a knife wound on th>' finger
of her right hand. She wa- ' tkcti to
Auto Crash
(Continued from Page 1>
frartic ar ! nerve-wracked, v»-
roamed or the road-ide with "Nee
ly'*” corpse partly on her lap:
"Neely, come hack, comp hack.
Nooly, don'* leave nul" Around th<
stricken widow lay other injured
persons, all of whom wore tak'n
to Jack*"n f' •' treatment. Piec< -
c: the almo-t demolished ca;s were
strewn abnu*.
Dead 'lan Likeable
According to tne widow and hrr
mother, when contacted by Tribune
staff member- in her home, «ho
managed to tail her mother at
about 1:30 Sunday morning about
the happening. Sadly -h<- related
what she knew of the fa’alitv. She
»a;d her husband worked a’ the
American Radiator company. He
wa* one of a farm:; of Mr. and
Mr* Wade Martin, survivor.* along
with three brother* and five sisters.
Tribune representatives vi«itcd
the scene of the fatality Sunday
morning and la*er cho< Krd on in
formation in da' k«on. Sheriff Har
vey A. Capmr* office through l>ep.
yty Melvm Hommerding, gave a
h::ef report bu* could give no
opinion as to tn«' c*is< of the
w.e.k. I'eputy H' mmerdirig ai-o
irpi ’ed tr.a* a third*e«r had been
- de-w ipe-d the mi.vup, bu* that
r.o ne had beep repotted injured.
All of the ]• ured De’roiter*
W'ere brought to Detroj*. "Neely's"
body ua*. brought bai a ;r; a hea'-e.
The wake wa- Tuesday night, the
fur era. wa- "edne-da ■ at 2 p. m.
a* Cer.t-al » M E. Church. the Rpv.
W. T Whltsette. pa-tor. Stinson's
furera’ home was in chaige.
And «<■', th:s mid-week, an< ther
acoihen- victim wa* carried to a
Ti-a. r r *t p ace. Into Woodmere
< eme'ery a p'n-*»-a.p widow, grief
stricken mother*, brother* and sis
tfr*. -a \ the la-t < f the mortal
rema r.s of “Nee iy" lowered into
the dark recec-e* of M ’her Earth,
"ha* wa* r'<--.ded to be a week
end o' happ:-es. ar.d joy turned
r>u* to h r ’ <• ai ll y a * Rendezvous
with ’
Bills
(Continued from pare 1)
her h. ; gu;da < the depart-
HBent ha - S #r, tr> feature (our
ihoi:» m momjnu service*.
In a•M;*.on to h . regular work
a* nun*S' rof• jw new* department.
8:..a ff-*'ii:r'i ,* >nltinin. “As m Man
Thtnke’h ’ Which was Widely If ad
by St. L i:-hAnother *pe< i«l
feature stressing injustices , r,m
inr to the Negro. was “Fleshpot o(
ft. Loms ' dne . r the latter Influ
enced the Shell Oil Company to re
rcove it* Swept Performance’
elans he'ore the July *. heduleg
were en’ered upon Shell, in St.
Louis, apologized Bills carried on
other investigation* nil nf which
• •cured good result*, such an al
leged discrimination on the Illinois
Central Railroad and by Collier’s
masazinc H' served as stage, dia*
ma and literary crlflr of the Call,
was a former member f the Music
association and a familiar figure at
all gathering*. He is the son of Dr
T.ee Kiln Mill* of Kan*as City. Kit*.,
widely known politician
Offlee p|. 4.VV) Rc«. Ff. 777«
! I lire Prorrhen
DR. O. O. SWEET
PAIM.FSS DF>T|MT
A real friend to tjj# poor man
who want* good work at
a low rat#
1700 fhene St. Detroit
Frtr* mi i r
Tor rntri ......... mi i r
triTran <ri*in. hui«t*. . *<>» rr
Mixnvn *i>«» «a* rr
triers t.aa rr
ariTrAsr* , t rr
radio* <rar, Home .... a»s rr
— _____ fiwnplete l ine At
I Shot run. - Trpe*rrlters Cameras
rieM masses - Warhtalst. lon Is
I allies' rsz ( nsll
Matlsraellnn (.iiaranleeil
IIIUMVT MMM
o*l 411 4et|e|es ms tain.
NPECIAI. PRICES
On Ont-Of.Pawn
LEWIS LOAN OFFICE
fill tintlnt Aienne
Receiving hospital given Art* aid
treatment and released after mak
ing a statement.
Kriegar was arreted a short
time la’er by police of th* Seventh
Frecinct.
Three Try
To End Lives
Two Men And
One Woman
Held in Polite Headquarter! on
a charge of malicious <iesti*liction
of p operty, Albert Heair, 23, 715
Madi-on. attempted to take his life
!a-t Friday afternoon by slashing
hi* left wrist with the rim of a
tin cup which he had sharpened on
the cement floor.
Mrs. Mamie Lane. 23, of 3758
Brush, made an unsuccessful at
tempt to end her life Sunday by
drinking poison after an argument
with her husband David who took
her to receiving Hospital,
Mrs. Ycrneacc Williams, 19, of
4248 St. Antoine, was taken to Re
ceiving Hospital Sunday after she
had taken an overdose of sleeping
tablets. Albert Williams, husband,
-aid his wife had been ill for some
time and took the tablets to obtain
rest.
Eugene Reed, 28, 1328 Benton,
t<>ld police that he had been having
domestic trouble for some time, and
explained that a* his rea-on for
attempting to commit suicide Sat
urday by cutting both wrists.
Music Communes With The Audience
To Jerk A Crescendo Os Applause
"Music bath it* charms,” an old
adage, wa- certainly brought to
iif< again Tuesday night at St.
■lohi * Pi e-byu i inn church, w hen
the Fold E’.gh*. a* perfect an en
semble of men'- voices a- might
be achievable, lifted in tonal per
fection a* one mightv organ and
kep* an appreciative a idience con
tinually a-king for more.
The inimitable group of young
men wa- pre.-ented bv the Non
pareil club. Mrs. Luljt Rogers, pres
ident, in the attractive newly dec
f"ated auditorium of the church.
Th'ir appearance wa- scheduieo
among the varied activities listed
for the church's week of festivities.
Although beginning inuph later
'han the scheduled hour, and that
beca .-e of the discouraging habit
w i have of coming in late, the *ing
ei* displayed artistry, virtual per
fection and complete understanding
of ai! number-.
Opened Religiously
We stayed through eight num
bers. "Come, Ye RlP'-cd," by Scott,
a *ort of prayer, opened th< pro
gram. Exhortation wa< expertly
trea’eci, enunciation good, each
me mber seeming to Ik attuned to*
wan! communion. The hav* pas
sage- were well outlined and the
final crescendo was reached with
out the u-ual -trident vocalizing of
concert singers.
The -econd number, “If, With
All Your Hearts,” displayed partic
ularly good phrasing, with an un
usually touching tenor obligato.
Lewis Mitchell, pianist and accom
panist, played Liszt’* “Etude in
I) Flat Major.” This young man
has music in his soul, so to «peak,
I but plays “sans affectation.” He
wa* obliged to play ”Internezz.o,”
reminiscent of the older days when
composer* improvised at the key
board.
Two martial tunes followed,
e PIIONKS pesliter.-e
*i. ai*a to. *-o;t«
E. M. BRI GG S
REAL ENTATE BROKER
1 - r».ji.-r' • Mansiti ii ent end In-ur.nea
Noliir) I‘illilir 44 Itli Seal
pes'il. h f SM llr.lmln.ler M.
'»*.*> (•r»tl»t al *>l. Anloiiit* Detroit
All Vw Furniture— Prime
4-ROOM OUTFIT
S9B—TERMS
"FREE” RADIO or STOVE
EASY CREDIT-TERMS
>0 DOW> PATMEST
FIRST PAYMENT !> JURE
f'n*tnm.hnllt Itmenpnrt and
( hair, Orr. Chair, Room Sl*e
R nor. End Tahir, Mar. Rark. I
Beautiful Matched Lamp*, Smok
er, Beautiful Picture. Pair Rook
End*, S-plece Matched Wat Fin.
I*h Bedroom Set, Bed. Che*t,
Dretter or Vanity 101 l Sprlnr.
Mattre««, Pr. pillow*, i-pc. Solid
Oak Itlnette. Kitchen Stool and
TnOn. Breakfast Set. Room Site
Rita. Electric Iron, Toaster and
Set of |ll*he«.
WASHINGTON
1365 Gratiot
Open Every Erenlna Till 9
SPEAKERS
i | ,£ tjEfl
aHBvl -V
wJjL;.. ijmjm
Donald Marshall, <(•>)•> Ford
Personnel department, and Wal
ter Hardin, international repre
sentatlu* of the | tW’-(IO. were
two of the s|ieakers at banquet
glien Friday for I’AW-CIO offl.
elals.
"Marching Along” and "Mus
keteers,” both, if we are not mis- I
taken, coming from the famous I
musical opera “Throe Musketeers.”
These were well received. Here
deep resonance of its voice.
"Be >nny" Parks, baritone, gave!
a good account of "Land of I)e-|
giadashun,” although we believe
it is rot quite suited to his voice,
requiring more of a basso pro
fundo, Hi« diction was perfect.
Secular Numbers
Two numbers, secular in nature,
were given next. One was "My
Sister and I,” touching upon mem
ories of recent blitzkriegs in Eng
land. Through the piece ran the
poignant theme, "We don't talk
nbout that.” One could almost visu
alize the stoical fortitude of the
Britishers as bombs burst over
their native land. A second was
"Band Playing." also martial, with
several stepped-up love tunes in
terwoven.
Mr, Dupree, tenor, sang "We
Three,” a number popularized by
a nationally known quartet. He was
supported by his colleagues and
Sow You Can Save Many Dollars
BEFORE THE NEW AUTO SLASH
film 10 (. HOO.SK I Rll.H DHIYE Howt
KowesMmnn Pawnent ill Detroit
1940 $650
1940 MERCURY SUE 525
1 Q4O FftRH M,K,,OR PELI’XE TOI KINT. i CA
IJ4U runu St DAS, HADIO, HEATER . .. 450
1940 OLDSMOBILE “T* “Vi!,;* T " ,R, ' fi 545
1940 DODGE SSKEgy™ 525
1939 CHEVROLET SV.;V« E ***“*" 295
1939 PONTIAC *£*■ 325
1939 FORD Tmi “ ,s,i 295
1939 PLYMOUTH -W 295
1939 BUICK“^S^ K IRI>K 375
1938 FORD VmH. *■“* 225
1938 CHEVROLET KEK TWMMi 250
1938 PLYMOUTH jgtf TRI s * 250
1938 DODGE sllim" TRr,K 275
1938 PONTIAC SSJT Z L »,V TRrM[ 295
1937 FORD TRrMt 155
1937 CHEVROLET „ ,0E
T.on* Fm* Terms To Nnlt Tonr Poeltethoo*
OPFT FTFRT MOHT om ET.FTFT P. M.
BERT BAKER
“THE BIG LOT”
9800 Grand River Cor. Livernois
NOrthlawn 9200
THE DETROIT TRIBUNE, SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1941
Make Similar
Request For Six
Other Schools
Board Promises
Action On The
Matter
Tw 0 thousand white and colored
West Side oitixens. supporters of
the aggressive West Side Human
| Relations council, signed petitions
! circulated by the organization and
later presented to the Detroit
board of education asking that Ne
gro teachers be plated in McGraw,
Sill, Sampson. Wingert, Columbia.
Mc.MiCliacl and Northwestern High
schools. The board, which received
the delegatirn presenting the re
quest, on July lt>. promised action
and consideration on the matter.
Awakening to its full possibility
a a coordinating organization, the
council has taken Interest in other
matters. Recently the adjustment
committee headed by the Rev. J.
Pettigrew met with the Commis
sioner of Polite and urged that an
investigation be made of disorder
ly houses and street gambling. The
council also protested the alleged
brutality of an officer In slapping
to the floor a minor child during
a raid on a confectionery store
which was found to be a policy sta
tion.
Very recently the Council took an
option on a house to be known as
"Hohby Center." The Warrendale
Community Center has given 200
book for a library.
Several west side youths have
been employed as a result of the
council's "Campaign for Jobs." All
of these things are done with the
view of making the west aide Ideal
a* a community.
Meetings are held the second
Mondays during the summer
months at the Lothrop branch of
the puhlio library system. J. Miles
i» president; A. McDowell, secre
tary. Further Information may be
secured by calling Tvler 4-5925.
The Quarrel Became
Too Noisy For Owner
Whillie Eskridge. 2l>, of the Bor
ton hotel, became obstreperous and
annoying while in the Greenvillage
Beer Garden, Montcalm and Hast
ings, Sunday, and was struck on
his head with a pistol in the hands
of Henry Jackson, IP6R Sherman,
proprietor of the beer garden.
Jackson told police that Eskridge
had been arguing in the place and
creating a disturbance.
again the bass section was afforded
splendid opportunity to show th'
featured a musico-vocal dramatiza
tion with one of the bassos. Du
pree's voice is truly drawing, ex
cept that in his higher register he
seems to strain. However, in mid
uie and lower, and with his strik
ing personality, he holds his au
dience.
The singers presented other num
bers. among which were spirituals.
Mr. Branham is manager. Their
most outstanding characteristics
are studied interpretation, splendid
bell canto, virtually perfect die
tmn. All in all, the whole gtnup
responds to an inner motive which
brings them vocally to the fore
like a mighty organ which can
reach to the heavens in diapason
passages and can be sweetest in
mezzo-voce and pianissimo. We
trust we shall hear them again.
8. P. B.
f mr, Mpjf|||l
|HHB ; 7;£v.:r l : :£/ *s
'll | , ' ,11 !'|l l I 1 1 ll,! ! 1 I| ,1
Scene at the banquet Friday
night in Lucy Thurman Branch
YWCA which was sponsored by
the Ford Organizing committee in
UAW-CIO President Warns
Workers To Attend Meetings
‘Negroes are never going to gain their place in the sun unless they are willing to
go out and fight for what they want,” Mas the warning issued by R. J.Thomsa, presi
dent of the UAW-CIO last Friday night.
Mr. Thomas was speaking at a banquet given by the Ford Organizing staff the
UAW-CIO in honor of official of the Union. The banquet was held in Lucy Thurman
Branch YWCA.
Emphasising the above remarks,
j Mr. Thomas pointed out that If
| <olored worker* in the Union went
to add to the rights already ob
tained they must attend meetings
regularly.
Donald Marshall, member of the
Personnel who was on the opposite
rifle of the fence prior to the suc
cessful organizing of workers at
the Ford Plant, after telling the
Inion riffle inis that they now "have
the responsibility, •* and urging
them to "suppress the radicals."
said he was “anxious to help make
the contract work’’ and had “no ill
will toward any of the Union
heads."
George F. Addes, international
secretary and treasurer, said there
is need of an educational program
as many of the whites “don't under
stand sufficiently that the only dif
ference In workers is in color " The
speaker said this program of edu
cation ran be aided by the press
and capital.
His 25 years of experience In
labor’s battle to reach the top was
told by Walter Hardin, internation
al representative.
"Some said Ford would never
BUILDERS OF HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION
_ :> x » , ■ . > .
™>kn near Nashville, Tennessee, on June 9,1848, James as Gauger in The Fifth Internal Revenue District of
. Ctl ' r ®! i Nl P‘ er educated at Wilberforce Univer- Tennessee, he filled the post of Deputy Collector until
•ity and Oberlin. But before the completion of his junior Cleveland's first administration,
year in college, he left school to accept a position in the
War Department at Washington, D. G Napier next started practicing law in Nashville, where
he was four times elected a member of the City Council.
In 1873 Napier was graduated from the law department the appointment of colored teachers in the
of Howard University and admitted to the bar. Having schools, the construction of new
« school buildings, and in general con
tributed greatly to the educational
and financial progress of the Negro.
After acting u Registrar of the
a bank. He served as its problem
until his death F
0 •
-
ijTV A
W m
pa p r n
# BEEK
IY "MFIAS" FOR FLAVOR
C 1941 ftWffM IMWIHO CO- P-—'
AT UAW-CIO BANQUET FOR OFFICIALS
honor of officials or the UAW-CIO
union. R. J. Thomas, president of
tha UAW-CIO, and George Addes,
international secretary and treas
! receive the I'nion" said Hardin,
j “but in spite of the difference we
did succeed in winning the best
j contract between labor and Indus
;try in the country."
Colored members of the PAW
i CIO are urging the election of
Hardin to the Executive board at
the national convention which will
be held next month in Buffalo.
“We want everything that indus
try can pay." said Mlrhael Wid
man, director of the Ford organiz
ing drive. “However, we want in
dustry to stay in business. No con
tract is worthwhile unless Industry
continues.
“We must give the company a fair
day's labor for a fair day's pay."
In explaining that ho was leaving
Detroit, Widnian said he “hopes
to be remembered as one.who did
his part to moke things better."
The Rev. Malcolm O. DHde, victor
of St. Syprians Episcopal church,
extended his praisp to the Negro
press for the support the I'AW-CIO
received In the Ford election.
Other speakers were Judge Lila
Xeunfelt, and Shelton Happs. the
2146 St. Antoine Street, Corner Columbia—Clifford 2924
urer, are seated at the speakers
table. More than two hundred
were present to hear the officials
tell of future plans.
alter chairman foundry at the Ford
River Rouge plant. Hosea was mas- i
ter of ceremony.
rWith TAJ Rloarh ('mm \§
and TAJ YnnMiimr Cream so^
mm
?Ar Cult* of T/%.1 C otnpinion snip A lh H
Thi« Coupon k jV
Juaf mall «on non NO IT—or- You 1 jHHI
ilrrlnt one jar of TAJ Blear li 7J(. X ' BpEj!^®
Cream and onr Jar of TAJ
l»i)Uhln| (roam (Prior of
ra< h. Me; Total Prior of Ilotlt
—"*1.001 H r n ill arml yon
tho»r (no fine • room* —nod In
addition, I-RICE. ><a will arnd
,'OU onr SOo I lot llr of TAJ
Hhllr Roar Prrfnmr and onr
!*r < nkr of TAJ Complexion
and Bounty Knnp. Send the
Coupon XOIV, Tlila la an In
troductory offer and won't laat
forey or.
Pfeiffer Presents
t
JAMES CARROL NAPIER
Eminent Politidan and lawyer
Foster
(CoatJnnrd f rom
b* en searching f or F OSUr .
have been unable to fi nd him / *
be «eve that he i. in hld J
will appear for the trial of the
white boys Saturday. ™
. .J* 1 ® r ‘* >tß *tacotl recently bv p,j
leh youths in Hamtramck ~/tf
troit subsided this w epk J
learned from Negro resident. II
BtJ, f t thcy h *'® not 1*
molested during the past
days.
The trial of sixteen youngs
boys arrested during the
age. was postponed f rpm SatunW
July ID, to Saturday, July 2$
tims who expect to testify area,
ious that as many colored citis»
as possible attend the trial *
postponement was given, it ~y
because one of the two youthtk
jured by shotgun charge w „ u
able to appear.
The group was arrested Wednet
day night, July P, when they retch
ed the climax of several dtvi and
vicious mob attacks upon Xm
families living on Newton, %
tween Jos. f'ampnu and Dubois.
Eddie Dew and Lemuel Foster
both of Newton street, will tt2
trial Friday, Aug. 1. on fht J
of carrying concealed weapons.
\> IM | |i
HI(»H IVI'I Ml\
iiho flfklrov |ieriiuinent and well
pnjinp |io»itloii. »< 11 j in; | ur ,].
Inro mid I arnpjimr to \,, irtl
ment« itnil Hotel*.
Write Box .1- Urtrnlt rrikuDe
SI (ft St. tiilninr M
; JAMII. AKIII AR. Prrallirm
J TAJ I’rrfumr Company.
I 1.1.1? f »rat lot Air. |ti troll X|uli
! "end mr TREE MV al/r 11 her Ron
; Prrfumo and ?.V »l/r lorn pin lon S«af.
; with m.v ordrr for ftOr Jnr of Blent
J Errant and 50c jnr Vnnlehlnc (roam,
j Prnd < 0.0. I pill pay tlir roaimm MM
| nnd the few centa poatoKr
! Nnmr
Addrraa
* Iff Mute

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