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The Detroit tribune. (Detroit, Mich.) 1935-1966, April 27, 1957, Image 1

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FOLLOW THE TRIBUNE'S SUPERINTENDENT CONTEST!
10c
VOLUME 35—NUMBER 10
3 Negro Women
FREED IN RACE DISPUTE
"Parents Share Blame For Pupils'
Poor School Work"
By ANDREW F. FRUEHAUF, C. S. + + +
(from "As Others See It," Free Press)
GOD TO HIS DETROIT TRIBUNE:
'SINS OF THE PARENTS VISITED UPON THE OFF.
SPRING' OF THE DEVIL'S ADAM-EVE DUPESI
My Chosen People, Christlike Christian Scientists!, con
sider conventional education purely supplementary to the
ecquisition of the basic facts of life in My indispensable,
incomparable, imperative Christian Science movementl—
"THE PREDESTINED, EVENTUAL, THE ONE AND THE
ONLY RELIGION AND THERAPEUTICS . . " OF ALL
RACES AND PEOPLESI
My, God's, two masterpieces—King James Protestant
Bible end the Christian Science textbook—Savior, liberator,
end protector of the Holy Scriptures; Master miracle worker,
heeler, end educator—AßE IMPERATIVE TO RAISE UP
TRUSTWORTHY MEN, WOMEN, AND CHILDRENI
(See PARENTS SHARE BLAME, Page 4)
Southern Workers Will Shy Away
From Unions
Labor Union leaders who have been assigned to organize
workers in the south must be mighty discouraged over the
results of the congressional investigations now underway
In Washington.
Several months ago, we read where one of these southern
organizers was complaining bitterly about the lack of suc
cess in his work. So disappointed had he become, he de
clared It would take help from the Federal Government to
complete his task.
(See SOUTHERN WORKERS, Page 4)
"Union Power"
"Two Readers Score Practices
of Labor"
Letter to the N. Y Herald Tribune:
ONE MIGHT THINK THAT LABOR LEADER WALTER
REUTHER WOULD BE A BIT SUBDUED BY THE CON
DITIONS BROUGHT TO LIGHT IN THE TEAMSTERS'
UNION BY THE SENATE INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE.
BUT NOT REUTHER. NO ONE CAN DENY THAT IT HAS
BEEN HIS VENGEFUL SPIRIT THAT HAS PROLONGED
THE KOHLER PLUMBING-FIXTURE STRIKE BY THE
UNITED AUTOMOBILE WORKERS' union in Wisconsin for
three long years, with its violence and vandalism. This strike
es so far conducted has admittedly failed, with an estimated
r.ost of from *8 to $10,000,000 to the union
(See UNION POWER, Page 4)
------ «
"Censored F.D.R. Yalta Photos,
Aid Discloses"
" 'SHOCKING' FILMS HELD FROM PUBLICATION"
(N. Y. Tribune)
"The President looks so haggard and weary."
GOD TO HIS DETROIT TRIBUNE:
The third and fourth terms were gigantic, spiritually
traitorous .frauds, multi-billion $, involuntary, spiritually
traitorous, Democratic intamy, permitting the Democratic
buildup of the devil's Communist and the blunder and In
famy of Pearl Harbor, which "lost China to the Reds," IN
AELIEFI
(See CENSORED F. D, R. YALTA, Page 2)
"Nation Is One-Third Socialized
Through Taxes, Economist Says"
By Ernest A. Baumgarth (News)
NSW YORK, April Id.—The nation is about one-third
socieHeod, because neerly a third of the national income Is
chenneled through government in the shape of taxes, an
economist told the Mortgage Bankers Association s annual
conference Hm. «> - .
Ho is P. Schmidt, director of economic re
search of t£eU. Chamber of Commerce. Schmidt joined
with Dr. Paul W. McCracken, member of the Pr "' d *" f 8
Council of Economic Advisers, and Dr. Grover W. Ensley,
executive director of the Joint Congressional Economic
Committee, in discussing the question of where the savings
will come from to finance the continued economic develop
ment of the country.
Ueiraily^^rilrtint
ItefniMlljp"’MMli> fIHC «pr DMii FuUUmc r« Tht Inviacfblt Triumpfc«*l DMm JUyfcls til Mm
1 nr
VTURDAY, APRIL 27, 1957
iu< liii 1
I • ■'
COTILLION PANEL TO
APPEAR ON TV: Representa
tives from the Cotillion Club,
an organization of young busi
ness and professional men. are
scheduled to appear on the
Guy Nunn television program.
"Meet The UAW." Sunday.
April 28. at 6:30 p.m. over
channel 9. CKLW-TV.
The five members who will
Newspaper Editor Denounces
Virginia Dinner, Goverhor
RICHMOND, * Va. (CNS)
With three invitations “misdi
rected” to prominent Virginian
Negroes, one correctly directed
invitations to white editor Lam
bert Davis was refused bluntly
and the dinner which will com
memorate the 350th anniversary
cf Jamestown with 600 nattve
Virginians in attendance, lam
basted.
Dr. Davis, director of the Uni
versity of North Carolina Press
at Chapel Hill, N. C., wrote his
answer in an open letter to
Governor Stanley. He said: “I
believe that I can best show
my loyalty to the great tra
ditions of Virginia by declining
your invitation.”
He went on to say that if he
were a Negro, “you would dele
gate Mr. Verbon Kemp of the
Chamber of Commerce to in
form me that the invitation was
a mistake. It is therefore not a
true invitation but an offer con
tingent upon my being able to
prove Caucasian ancestry.”
Lashing out at Governor Stan
ley, Mr. Davis wrote:
"When sober minds all over
the South have looked to the
Old Dominion for leadership,
you have offered only the bar
ren slogan of massive resist
ance, the tyrannical suppres
sion of all local freedom, end
a mass of witless obstructive
legislation that is rightly
!swswSs USSpISisH

m W
constitute the panel will, dis
cuss local issues that affect the
community, including employ
ment, housing, community re
lations and education.
Scheduled to appear on the
program with Mr. Nunn are
Cotillion President Damon J.
Keith, attorney; Edward T.
Sylvester, civil engineer; Wal
doomed to the judicial scrap
heap.
“And now you find yourself
or a great and solemn occasion
in the history of the Common
wealth, in the ridiculous position
of asserting in effect that being
Miss. White Man Gets 20
Years For Abusing Girl
MAGNOLIA, Miss.—The ad
mitted ringleader of four white
men accused of abusing a 16-
year-old Negro girl was sen
tenced last week to 20 years at
hard labor and was told by the
judge his actions “had brought
bitter condemnation on the state
of Mississippi.”
Circuit Judge Tom Brady pro
nounced sentence against 30-
year-old Ernest Dillon of Tyler
town, who was allowed to plead
guilty to a reduced charge of
assault with intent to rape.
Dillon one of three men ac
cused of raping the girl, had
been held on rape charges since
the May 13, 1956 incident.
Judge Brady disclosed that the
Negro girl, her mother, and her
uncle were consulted before the
charge against Dillon was re
duced.
The judge taid the three told
him they did not want Dillon
to suffar tha daath panalty
and agreed 20 years was an
970 GRATIOT, DETROIT 7, MICHIGAN PRICE: SlNOlfe'LtJPr 10 LBN IS; PER YEAR, $4 50
lace Triplett, insurance execu
live; William C. Mainey.
newspaper editpr; and Dr.
Thomas M. Batchelor, internal
medicine specialist and mem
ber of the Hospital Medical
Advisory Committee.
The Cotillion Club is a non
partisan organization dedi
cated to civic betterment.
distinguished is an accomplish
ment possible only for people
of Caucasian ancestry. You have
succeeded in making the lead
ership of the Commonwealth
both a stench and a laughing
stock in the nation.”
"appropriate" punishment.
One of the other defendants,
Ollie Dillon, 45, was the only
one of the four charged with
kidnapping.

The rape trial of Duroa Dun
can ended in a hung jury and
a mis-trial declaration but Dis
trict Attorney Mike Carr said
he would try him again in Oc
tober. Duncan’s cousin, Olun
Duncan, was acquitted of rape
charges.
U of M Lowest
In Academic Failure
The University of Michigan
has one of the lowest records
of academic failures for first
year freshmen of any of the
colleges and universities in the
country. The U-M figure aver
ages about 6 per cent wheroas
the national average is from
20 to 30 per cent.
Montgomery, Ala.
Man Found Guilty
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (Special) Three Negro wom
en were freed this week on charges evolving from a fight
aboard a racially-integrated city bus. A white man was
fined SSO and costs for assault and battery charges after a
witness said he struck two Negro women on the bus.
Judge Eugene Loe in City
Court dismissed charges
against one of the women.
He acquitted the other two.
Judge Loe said that James
E. Grice Jr., was the ag
gressor in the disturbance.
Grice ordered the women
to move to the back of the
bus.
City Prosecutor David M.
Crosland recommended that
N.C. Policy Restricts
Negro Registration
NEW YORK.—Citing comparative figures of Negro reg
istration in North Carolina and those of citizens of British
Guiana, Roy Wilkins, NAACP executive secretary, asserts
in a letter to Senator Samuel J. Ervin (D. t N. C.) that “it is
fair to deduce that a policy is in operation in North Caro
lina designed deliberately to restrict the registration of
Negro citizens to vote.”
When Mr. Wilkins appeared
before the Senate Subcommit
tee on Constitutional Rights
on Feb. 19. Senator Ervin
stated that there was no re
striction against Negroes reg
istering and voting in North
Carolina. He expressed the
opinion that the relatively low
registration was due to apathy
or to occasional hostility of
registrars in a few localities.
According to a story published
in The New York Times, 75 per
| cent of adult citizens in British
Guiana are registered to vote,
; Mr. Wilkins told the Senator in
a letter dispatched today. On
| the other hand, he pointed out,
only 20 per cent of eligible
North Carolina Negroes are reg
istered.
“British Guiana is not ordi
narily classified by Americans
as on a par with a sovereign
state in the United States, cer
tainly not a state like North
Carolina,” the NAACP leader
said. “Yet the percentage of
registered voters would seem to
be much higher than that of the
Negro citizens of North Caro
lina, and very much higher than
this same registration in other
southern states.” •
“We believe,” the letter con
tinues, “that federal action to
protect the right to register and
vote is clearly indicated and
that the pending civil rights bill
should be passed. We believe,
further, that the condition re
vealed is of such proportion*?,
and of such long standing, that
the Attorney General of the
United States should be given
the authority to institute civil
action as provided by the pend
ing measure.”
Wins Fellowship
To Harvard
Edward D. Irons of Florida
A and M University has been
granted a fellowship by the
graduate school of business of
Harvard University to study
towards the doctoral degree.
Mr. Irons received the bache
lor of science degree from Wil
berforce State College (Cen
tral State) and the master of
hospital administration from
the University of Minnesota.
He is the second member of
the Florida A and M faculty
to be granted a fellowship by
Harvard. He is a native of Tul
sa,* Okla., and is presently em
ployed as an assistant to the
business manager,
10c
the charges b e dropped
against Mrs. Jonnie Mae
Eaves. Mrs. Annie Burch and
Josephine Boldin were ac
quitted by Judge Loe.
This was the first incident
of violence since the bus sys
tem was integrated by Fed
eral Court order on Dec. 21,
1955. . .
Governor Urges
Citizens To
Join NAACP
BOSTON.—Gov. Foster Fur*
”010 has urged citizens of Massa
chusetts to support the member
ship drive of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People in this state.
In a proclamation designat
ing April as "NAACP Mam
bership Month." the Governor
noted that "the NAACP is an
organisation in the service not
only of the Negro, but also
of the nation as a whole." The
work of the Association, he
pointed out, has "borne fruit
in the form of improved con
ditions and expanding recog
nition of the Negro's right to
full citizenship."
Case Operator
Refuses Supreme
Court Ruling
HOUSTON, Texas—When the
United States Supreme Court
last week ordered the cafeteiia
in the basement of the Harris
County courthouse to serve Ne
groes on a non-discriminatory
basis as whites are served, the
management served notice that
the case would close its doors
before it would bow to the orders
of the High Court.
The County Commissioners
court has approved a request
from W. F. Derrington, the ope
rator, that his two-year lease be
terminated.
Luster Allen Jr., board presi
dent of the County Employes
union, said county workers
would meet Monday to form an
organization for operation of the
cafeteria as an eating place for
the employes and their guests.
Allen said three county work
ers had applied for a charter to
form an employee club. He said
the cafeteria probably wtould re
open Tuesday on a club basis.
This would allow employees to
set up rules on who could use
the cafeteria.
M W. Plummer, attorney who
filed the suit to end segregation
at the cafeteria, has said he
would oppose any ‘‘subterfuge"
to reopen the cafeteria on a seg
regated basis.

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