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The Detroit tribune. (Detroit, Mich.) 1935-1966, May 18, 1957, Image 1

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Lions Get John Henry Johnson From 49ers
; : |H ' # V^F_wMftp«V
VOLUME 35—NUMBER 13
DETROITERS TO PRAYER PILGRIMAGE
"HELP YOUR HUSBAND LIVE"
"Job Frustration Erupts At Home"
(Dotroit Nows)
By ANDREW F. FRyEHAUF, C. S. + + +
GOD TO HIS DETROIT TRIBUNE:
THE ONE BASIC, IMPERATIVE EMPLOYMENT
NEVER CEASES! IT IS "THE FATHERS BUSINESS '—
to which Jotut wu dodlcatod ovon of tho ago of 12—and
IT IS THE NEVER-CEASING WORK of all racos and
pooplos, without interruption—a work of joy, poaco, and
heavenly bliss of omnipresent heaven and eternal llfel
True, it is a spiritual "WARFARE WITH THE WORLD,
THE FLESH, AND THE DEVIL"!
(See JOB FRUSTRATION, Page 2)
"Life More Abundantly"
The ELLINGTONS' NEW CAR— A DESOTOI
"EVERY GOOD AND PERFECT GIFT IS FROM
ABOVE, AND COMETH DOWN FROM THE FATHER
OF LIGHTS, WITH WHOM THERE IS NO
VARIABLENESS ..."
GOD TO HIS DETROIT TRIBUNE:
Dear Readers: Some of the gangsters drive Cadillacs!
BUT to have a DeSoto with a clear conscience, THAT IS
PRECIOUS, BEYOND PRICE! . . .
It is "A GRAND AND GLORIOUS LIFE" if you have tho
right understanding. And fortunately, in this ago, you can
have it VIA MY ONLY PURE, AND TRUE, AND COM
PLETE CHURCH AND 'UNIVERSITY'—the only source of
pure, divinely inspired THINKING, DISCIPLINE, EDUCA
TION, LEADERSHIP gs a universe SUPER-SATURATED
with omnipresent heaven and eternal life, wherein all of
you find your true being, My eternal imago and likeness!
(Sot LIFE MORE ABUNDANTLY, Pago 2)
"Charges Union Boycotts Push
Prices Higher"
CURTIS SEEKS TO PLUG LAW'S tOOPHOLES
By William Moore (Chi. Tribune)
Washington, April 29—San. Curtis [R., Neb.) today de
manded legislation to free American consumers from what
he called the "conspiracy" of the Sheet Metal Workers*
union. He sold the union is forcing prices up by means of
a secondary boycott.
(See CHARGES UNION, Page 2)
"Railway Express Sues Two Unions"
$5,000,000 DAMAGES SOUGHT FROM TEAMSTER
LOCALS IN STRIKE HERE
By Ralph Katz (N. Y Times)
. A $5,000,000 damage suit was died yesterday in Federal
court here by the Railway Express Agency against two local
unions of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. The
suit charges the locals with engaging in an unlawful strike
or work stoppage against the agency's transportation busi
ness In the metropolitan area.
The suit also seeks an inunction restraining the locals
from continuing the stoppage and asks for $250,000 for each
day of the strike. It started last Tuesday evening. The locals
are 459 and 808 of the teamsters union.
see
"Boy, 5, Kffled By School Bis"
"James A. Frankhouse ... ran into the side of a school
bus in front of his home. •• •" (Times)
"Happy' GirTsDeath Prob«£_,
". . . 16-year-old ward of the State Training School for
Girls in Adrian, collapsed in a classroom and died within
an hour The girl, from Port Huron, was committed
from St. Clair County last February.... The girl had under
gone major surgery before she was committed to the
school. . . (No name given)
"CAR CRASH HURLS GIRL, 3, TO DEATH '
"Margaret Thurmond, 3, was hurled on th « P av#m *" t
last night when an auto driven by her mother,
failed tc atop at a through street and was struck by .nether
car.. •." (Times)
"Baby Strangles On Aspirin Tablet
'Pr.ncu Mary AM.rd, 15 rtrmptod *«
In hw ham. ~. wh«t «\'*hM*n'» •*«"' , * b, * t lod9 * d 1
hw MirMt...(Tim*)
SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1957
Bowman, Stits To 'Frisco
Sees Jury Trial Demand
! .
In Rights Case 'Spurious'
. NEW YORK.—The claim advanced by southerners seek
ing to weaken the pending civil rights bill on the ground
that it deprives election officials, who bar NegYoes from the
polls, of a "constitutional right" to trial by jury is "trans
parently spurious," Rpy Wilkins, NAACP executive secre
tary, charged here today.
In a letter to unita of the
Association throughout the
country, Mr. Wilkins warned
that foes of civil rights by bring
ing up this issue are seeking to
sabotage the bill which is now
bottled up in the House Rules
Committee and the Senate Ju
diciary Committee. The bill, de
signed to protect the right to
vote, has bi-partisan support. It
would enable the U. S. Attorney
General to initiate civil action
against local officials and others
who interfere with the right to
vote. Persons found guilty would
be held in contempt ,if they dis
obeyed the order of a federal
district court judge to discon
tinue such interference.
Amendments Flouted
Tt is now contended that
the provision for dvil action
.and injunctive procedure by
the Attorney General would
deprive election offidals who
disfranchise Negro dtisens of
their 'constitutional right' to
a trial by jury." the NAACP
leader asserted.
“The state and regional gov
ernments which have shameless
ly flouted tne 14th and 15th
Amendments to the U. S. Con
stitution (as well as sections of
the Bill of Rights), which have
encouraged and defended the
registrars in the flouting, and
which have come to power at
home and tin Washington by
reason of this flouting, have now
the unmitigated gall to advance
the transparently spurious claim
Rights Head Encouraged
On Bill Passage
WASHINGTON, D. C—Sen
ator Thomas C. Hennings, Jr.
(D., Mo.) issued the following
statement recently:
"On Monday morning. May
13th. at the Senate Judiciary
Committee's meeting, t shall
move that tha Committee meet
every single day, mornings,
aftornoons and evenings—ex
cept Sundays and during those
hours of other days whan tha
Senata itself is actually in ses
sion—until a civil rights bill
is reported to tho Senate.
"I am most reluctant to use
the ugly word ‘filibuster,* but it
does seem to me that, to date,
Appoint UNCF
Division Chairman
N. YORK Appointment
of Charles W. V. Mears, vice
president of the New York Life
Insurance Cos., as Men’s Divis
ion chairman for the United
Negro College Fund’s New
York City appeal, has been an
nounced by Lee H. Bristol,
Myera Cos., and national cam
paign chairman for the Fund.
3fr. Meares i* active in na
tional, state and civic projects.
He serves on the advisory
council of the National Indus
trial Conference Board; on the
committee on industrial prob
lems of the Chamber of Com
merce of New York State; and
on the educational policy com
mittee of the Insurance Socie
ty of New York. He is also a
member of the board of direc
tors of the Multiple Sclerosis
Society and the Manhattan
lEar and Throat Hospital.
that the proposed bill would
violate a ‘constitutional right.'
'The truth is that the bill -
would deprive no one of any
constitutional right." Mr. Wil
kins told local leaders of the
Association. 'The constitu
tional right to a jury trial in
a criminal action remains.
Anyone charged under the t
criminal code will have, as in
the past, the right to a Jury
trial.
No Constitutional Guarantee
“But there is not and has never
been any constitutional guaran
tee of a jury trial in the type
of civil action provided by the
bill. One cannot be deprived of
something that does not exist.
These court orders are. issued
only after a hearing before a
judge in which witneeies are
heard and the accused has coun
sel and the right to cross-ex
amine. If the injunction should
be issued and disobeyed the de
fendant is found in contempt
and the punishment is assessed
by the judge who issued the
order. The defendant would have
the right to appeal."
Meanwhile support for the
NAACP position came from
Mitchell Franklin, professor of
law at Tulane University in New
Orleans. In a letter to the New
York Times published on May 5,
Mr. Franklin cited Assistant At
torney General Warren Olney’s
condemnation of attempts to
nullify the bill by providing for
trial by jury.
we have had an inordinately
protracted • discussion in the
Committee about even taking up
the subject of civil rights. I
believe we should proceed with
a full and free discussion on the
merits of this important legis
lation, holding committee meet
ings every day, so that we may
report a bill to the Senate with
in the near future.
“Many people have forgotten
that the Constitutional Rights
Committee, of which I have the
honor to be Chain /tan, reported
the bill favorably as long ago
as March 19th, 1957, after 13
days of public hearings, which
began on February 14th. The
printed record ran to over 900
pages. . , . M
Banquet Given
MARSHALL, Texas - The
young ladies were dressed in
lovely evening gowns and the
young men were dressed in tux
edo# as 4 Coleridge-Taylor
Choral Society of Bishop pre
sented its Annual Spring Con
cert Sunday, May 5, 1957. The
Choir, under the direction of
J. Harrison Wilson and ac
companied by Webby Bennett
staged a masterful performance
as they’ve been doing all this
season
A highly responsive and ap
preciative audience heard the
rhoir sing the following elec
tions in Bishop’s Oscar A. Ful
ler Memorial Chapel: “O Praise
the Name of the Lord,*’ “Bless
the Lord O My Soul” "Hoapodi
Pomilui,” “Hymn to the Virgin."
“The Silver Swan" “All the
Things you are,” "Country
Style ” “The Sexiest from Lucia,
rfi 'Lamjnermoor,” and several
other selections.
970 GRATIOT, DETROIT 7, MICHIGAN PRICE: SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS; PER YEAR, *ASO
Uon's Nemesis,
John H. Johnson,
Now In Lion's Den
Detroit Lions’ Coach Buddy
Parker announced Tuesday that
he had traded two of his veteran
backs to. San Francisco ’49ers
for Halfback John Henry John
son. . .
Fullback Bill Bowman and
defensive Halfback Bill Slits
were traded for the brilliant
Johnson, whom Parker intend
to convert to the fullback po
sition.
The move strengthened both
teams, inasmuch as the Lions
have needed a hard-running,
blocking fullback for several
seasons and the ’49ers sought a
first class defensive back, and
they have them in Johnson and
Stits, respectively.
Johnson, for the past three
years, has been the Lions* No. 1
nemesis. He is a big (205 lbs.)
brusing back with speed and a
superb blocker. He is also the
first Negro to play for the Lions
since 1954 when Elijah Chil
ders played the last tlfu J of the
season at tackle.
Bowman, on the other hand,
last season, his second year, was
plagued by injuries while Stitts
also in his second year, saw
very little action.
John Henry gained 301 yards
last year on 80 ball-carrying at
tempts. He scored a paid of
touchdowns, and his long gain
was 54 yards. Bowman carried
only 20 times, picked up 84
yards and had a long gain of 13
yards.
In addition to his ball carry
ing, Johnson caught eight passes
for 90 yards, an average of 11.3
per catch.
Teachers To Look At
City's Vast Background
Six hundred teachers and the
Detroit Board df Education will
board a special 10-car train here
Saturday, May 18. for a behind
the-scenes look at the city’s vast
industrial backyard.
They will be guests of the
Railroaul Community Commit
tee of Greater Detroit on an
educational trip designed to
give them a better under
standing of how Detroit indus
try functions, and a closer look
at the role transportation plays
in keeping the wheels of busi
ness turning.
The rail committee represents
the nine railroads serving the
Detroit area.
The tour, first of its kind ever
held for Detroit teachers, is be
ing conducted in cooperation
with the Board of Education as
a feature of National Transpor
tation Week and Michigan
Week. *
The special train, made up
of streamlined, air-conditioned
coaches, will take the teachers
over trackage usually reserved
for freight trains and seldom
seen by passengers. It will
travel some SO miles over
tracks of the Chespeake and
Ohio, the Union BeU. Detroit
Terminal end Grand Trunk
Western.
The train will leave the Fort
Street Union Depot at 10 am.
and return at 1:30 p.m.
ftah Drirvr
Stays Hitlor
Earl F. Gilbreath, 64. of 1723
Longfellow, wes held for investi
gation of murder Monday in the
fetal stabbing of a passenger in
an argument over a fare.
Dead of a chest stab wound is
Luther Willims of 624 Benton,
whom Gilbreath said threatened
him with a bottle.
Local Civic Leaders
To March For Freedom
Detroit is well represented in the Washington Prayer
Pilgrimage. Many civic, civil rights and spiritual thinking
men and women of Detroit will be among those who will
march in the “National Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom,”
which will be held in Washington, D. C., on Friday, May 17.
The celebration of the third
anniversary of the Supreme
Court decision outlawing segre
gation in the public school sys
tem will mark a prayerful sig
nificant event
Among the Detroiters in
cluded in the grand and noble
march arei the Reverend and
Mrs. Charles S. Spivey of St.
Stephens AME Church, the
Reverend A. A. Banks. Second
Begs for 10c
Has $5,000
In Bank
A 66-year-old man classified
by police at Detroit’s profes
sional beggar, with a $5,700
bank balance and $199.09 in his
pockets when arrested Wednes
day for begging a policeman for
a dime, was sentenced to 30 days
in the House of Correcti«v
Thursday by Recorder’s Juc f*
George Murphy.
He is Genter Adams, no home.
Adams was arrested at Bag
ley and Grand River, when he
begged Patrolman Gordon Had
ley of the bum squad.
Adams has a record of 36
arrests In his last 20 convictions
he served time rather than to
pay a fine.
Adams was released from the
House of Correction several days
before his arrest when he served
90 days on the same charge.
The officer quoted him saying.
“I must save my money for old
age. I can’t afford to spend a
penny.” «dig
See Change In
Southern Attitude
CHICAGO A change in
southern school administrators
has been noted in a June EB
ONY article entitled, “The End
of Uncle Tom Teachers. ’’
One* instructors and col
lage conformed to tradition
and invited visiting white
trustees to an all-out perfor
mance of Nigra spirituals be
fore asking for school grants.
Fortunately, the hat-in-hand
approadi now has become
unnecessary with grants from
the United Negro College
Fund and the Ford Founda
tion for private schools.
In the classroom, teachers
are becoming more vocal on
points of democracy and inte
gration. Outside of the school
teachers are also actively prac
ticing their preachings. In re
ference to the recent bus boy
cotts, EBONY says that pro
fessors at Alabama State Col
lege and Florida A and M were
the most ardent supporters.
Alabama State prose siors
worked as taxi drivers. A wo
man instructor edited the
Montgomery Improvement As
sociation Bulletin.
The fire under the trend
may well be the student groups
eager for first-class citisenship
and first-class educations. EB
ONY cites the recent demon
strations at Mississippi’s Alcorn
College to oust history pro
fessor. tfennon King of pub
licly criticising the NAACP
and Negro leaders. A boycott
of classes at South Carolina
State resulted whn President
Turner replied that school con
tracts for products of White
Citizens Council members
could net be broken.
Baptist Church, tha Reverend
G. L. Burton. Clara Banks.
Margaret Baker. Daisy Elliott.
Allen East. Caroline Watson.
Geraldine Gentry, Marie
Starks. Lee Cain, Annette
Rainwater. Mesdamea L. Ed
wards, S. A. Brown, Mr. C.
Winters.
Those who wish to see the
group off can meet them at the
Greyhound Bus Depot Thursday
at six p.m. and the B. and O.
Railroad Station at eight p.m.
Prayer Pilgrims
To Hear Clergy
And Congressmen
WASHINGTON—The nation’s
leading clergymen will be joined
by civil rights leaders, including
two members of Congress, as
speakers at the Prayer Pilgrim
pected to bring 50,000 persons
age for Freedom whioh is ex
from all sections of the country
to the Lincoln Memorial here
on Friday (May 17) for spiritual
guidance and inspiration in the
struggle for human rights.
On call of the three co
chairman —A. Philip Ran
dolph. president of tha Broth,
arhood of Sleeping Car Por
ters; Rev. Martin Luther King.
Jr... president. Southern Lead
ars Conference; and Roy Wil
kins, NAACP executive secre
tary—tha people will assemble
at high noon before tha Lin
coln shrine to "renew our
strength, communicate our
unity, and redadicata our ef
forts, firmly but peaceably, to
tha attainment of freedom."
In addition to the co-chair
men. speakers will include Adam
Clayton Powell, the clergyman
congressman from New York
City and Representative Charles
Diggs Jr., of Detroit. 11l in the
Naval Hospital, William H. Daw
son of Chicago, the third Negro
congressman, will be unable to
attend.
There will be prayers and
scripture readings by the Right
Reverend Sherman L. Greene of
Atlanta, senior bishop of the
AME Church; the Rev. J. H.
Jemagin. president. National
Baptist Sunday School and Bap
tist Training Union; and other
clergymen.
Music at tha avant will ba
furnished by Mahalia Jackson,
tha notad gospal singar. a 700
voice community chorus under
the direction of Warner Law
son of Howard University, and
audience hymn singing. Pray
ers and scriptura readings will
includa a "Litany of Free
dom.**
The purpose of the Prayer
Pilgrimage is to commemorate
the third anniversary of the
Supreme Court's anti-segrega
tion ruling in the school segre
gation cases, call for enactment
of pending civil rights legisla
tion, protest recent anti-Negro
violence and terror in the South,
and pay tribute to the memory
of Abraham Lincoln.
fhsk fin Kitts Tat 2
Two year-old Keith Pickett
of 1001 Puritan, perished Mon
day in a flash fire in the second
floor bedroom of his home
while his mother, Dorothy, 2S,
was away.
He was a victim of suffocation.
Keith and his brother. Pres
ton, 4. had been left in the care
of the landlady. Mrs Cora Smith,
who lives on the first *toor o(
tha gams address*

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