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The Detroit tribune. (Detroit, Mich.) 1935-1966, July 02, 1960, Image 1

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VOLUME 38—NUMBER 30
"RABBIS ASK BIRTH CURB DATA TO UN"
Fret Press 6-24
GOD VIA HIS DETROIT TRIBUNE:
By ANDREW F. FRUEHAUF, C.S.++ +
GOOD FOR THE RABBIS! THEY CAN'T ALWAYS
BE PRISONERS OF THE DEVIL!
The Central Conference of American Rabbis Thurs
day urged that the United Nations be given the means to
help nations teach birth control.
The Reform rabbis are holding their 71st convevntion
at Detroit* Sheraton Cadillac Hotel.
IN A RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE CONVEN
TION, THE RABBIS SAID THE UN WORLD HEALTH OR
GANIZATION SHOULD BE GIVEN "THE MEANS TO EN
ABLE IT, WHERE REQUESTED, TO PROVIDE EDUCA
TION, TECHNIQUES AND THE MATERIALS FOR BIRTH
CONTROL."
POLITICAL 'SCOOP' - DRAMATIZING
'A NATURAL'!
"NIXON'S FARM SOLUTION: FEED WORLD'S
HUNGRY"
"PROPOSES U.S. AND OTHER NATIONS
DISTRIBUTE SURPLUS THROUGH U.N."
* * *
"NIXON ENTERS THE FARM DEBATE"
N.Y. Trib. edi*'l. 6-22
In his speech in North Dakota on Monday, the Vice-
President formally entered the campaign debate on the
problem of American agriculture, which is surely one of
the most serious domestic problems we face. The farm
question is so complex that no solution or set of solutions
easily comprehended by the public can be formulated.
All that can be formulated are aims.
* * *
BROADLY SPEAKING, THERE ARE TWO PRINCIPAL
AIMS. THE FIRST IS TO ASSURE THE FARMERS OF
THIS COUNTRY A DECENT LIVING WITHOUT THE
VEXATIOUS AND VERY EXPENSIVE STRUCTURE OF
CONTROLS AND SUBSIDIES EVERY ONE NOW SHOULD
ERS.
The second is to put to worth-while use the enormous
agricultural surpluses we have accumulated in storage bins
and to bring farming into a balance which will prevent the
building up of such surpluses in the future.
* * *
WE HAVE NOW HAD THIRTY YEARS OF ELABOR
ATE AGRICULTURAL PLANNING, BUT THERE HAS
BEEN NO ALLOWANCE FOR THE EXTRAORDINARY
RISE IN PRODUCTIVITY OWING TO ADVANCES IN
TECHNOLOGY. A FARMER TODAY CAN, AT LEAST,
GROW TWICE AS MUCH CORN AS HE COULD IN 1930,
AND WHILE DURING WORLD WAR II AND THE POST
WAR PERIOD THE WORLD COULD ABSORB ALL HE
COULD PRODUCE, CONDITIONS ARE VERY MUCH
CHANGED TODAY.
Unfortunately, the price supports which were design
ed to encourage production then have not changed. They
are still with us. So, instead of being encouraged to produce
for the market, the farmer is encouraged to produce for
storage, and the consumer is paying, in effect, a large
and useless tax on his food.
• * *
"NIXON'S FARM SOLUTION: FEED
WORLD'S HUNGRY"
N.Y. Trib. 6-21
By EARL MAZO
MINOT, N.D., June 20.—Vice-President Nixon dis
closed today a mammoth plan to ease America s agricultural
problem and feed hungry people throughout the world
by having the United Nations distribute farm surpluses on
a vast scale.
THE PROPOSAL WAS A HIGHLIGHT OF PRESI
DENTIAL CANDIDATE NIXON'S FIRST MAJOR PRO
NOUNCEMENT ON THE FARM ISSUE, WHICH HE CALL
ED "THE TOUGHEST AND BIGGEST DOMESTIC PRO
BLEM CONFRONTING AMERICA."
A JOINT EFFORT
Mr. Nixon told a Republican barbecue- rally in this
typical farm-belt community that he and other Admmistra
tion leaders jointly developed the program which, m
sence, would be a co-operative effort of the "have
countries to share with the "have nots.
PRESIDENT EISENHOWER ORIGINALLY INTENDED
TO UNVEIL IT AT THE SUMMIT CONFERENCE LAST
MONTH AND INVITE RUSSIA'S PARTICULAR PARTICI
PATION, SAID MR. NIXON.
* * *
SEE BACK PAGE FOR REVELATIONS OF ETERNAL
PERFECTION OF GOD'S CREATION - YOUR TRUE
BEING I- AND EXPOSURE OF THE M-Y-T-H-S -
DEVIL. HELL, SIN. BIRTHS.' DISEASE. DEATH.
WARS. MATTER IADAM-EVE, MURDERJHJS
CAIN. JUDAS - "GHASTLY FARCE -FOOUNG
SAULS OF TARSUS. 90 YEARS PJUSRJPVAN
WINKLE. NON-CHRIST SCIENTIST CLERGY!
HK^EumiBUAAAERUI6kSfifc6^HH
fas*
. mmmm #
m mm W VrVßr
Mpriuntinf "Our Father-Mother Cod:" our Divine Publisher Crusader For The Invincible Triumphant Divine Rights of Men
970 GRATIOT AVENUE, DETROIT 7, MICHIGAN
Rips Ga. Vote Tests
International Freedom
Festival This Week
The International Freedom Fes
tival, which links together Can
ada’s Dominion Day and Indepen
dence Day will be in
Detroit and Windsor during the
week of June 28 through July 4.
The Festival, which has at
tracted a great interest from
coast to coast, was initiated by
James M. Hare, Secretary of State,
who urged Mayor Michael Pa
trick of Windsor and Mayor Louis
Miriani of Detroit to co-sponsor
the event.
“This colorful Festival is al
ready bringing many tourists
from other States plus other
lands to Michigan and Ontario,”
Hare pointed out. “It is my hope
that we will in time celebrate
these days throughout the Great
Lakes area and all along the
border between Canada and the
United States.”
Hare, as Michigan Secretary of
State, is responsible for many
governmental activities whi c h
concern other countries and their
local consulates. He also deals
in reciprocity agreements with
motor vehicle administrated in
Ontario and other provinces.
Introduces Bill
Outlawing Job'
Discrimination
Senator Pat. McNamara (D.
Mich ), with the co-sponsorship
cf Senators Jennings Randolph
fD. W. Va.) and Joseph Clark
(D. Pa.) —all members of the
Senate Subcommittee on Prob
lems of the Aged and Aging—
introduced a bill outlawing job
discrimination tor reasons ot age
in the personnel and employment
practices of employers holding
Federal contracts. Compliance
with this policy would be a con
dition lor approving such con
tracts.
Unlike other similar proposals,
the McNamara - Randolph • Clark
bill, entitled the “Equality ot
Employment Opportunities lor
Older Workers Act,” would also
require regional conferences eon
ducted by the Department ol
Labor for the orientation of la
bor and management groups on
the topic of performance abili
ty of older workers, and peri
odical compliance surveys.
In introducing the bill, Sena
tor McNamara declared that the
“waste of manpower, the effect
ot such hiring prejudice on the
morale of the individual and on
the resources of the community
simply do not make sense . . .
Even in times oi full employ
ment, when labor is scarce, the
practice of age discrimination
exists.”
Roy Wilkins Honored
By His Alma Mater
MINNEAPOLIS Honored by the University of Minn
esota from which he was graduated in 1923, Roy Wilkins,
NAACP executive secretary, this week received his alma
mater’s Outstanding Achievement Award at the closing ses
sion of the Association’s 51st annual convention.
Also honored at the session
! was Langston Hughes who re
ceived the 45th Spingarn Medal
for his many and notable literary
contributions. Presentation of
the award was made by Arthur
B. Spingarn. brother of the don
or and longtime NAACP presi
dent.
In presenting the university’s
Outstanding Achievement Award,
Vice President Malcolm M. Wil
ley cited the distinguished a.urn*
nus as a "dynamic spokesman for
recognition of the rights and dig
nity of all men, master strategist
in a great crusade tir eliminate
second-class citizenship, skillful
cambatant of the anti democratic
forces of bigotry and ignorance."
Mr. Wilkins accepted the ewerd
"with gratitude end with humili
ty, certain in the conviction that
many dedicated people of a va
riety of racial end religious back
grounds, northern end southern,
have had a share in whatever
SAiUKDAY, JULY 2, 19t>0
,-fc ,<• ti .
* 'VSiafc T 4# 4 dftWy.t IHm" J|! ..
A S2OO SCHOLARSHIP for business administration students study
ing real estate has been established at the Detroit Institute of
Technology by the Detroit Real Estate Brokers Association, Inc.
liershel Phillips, 1188 Edison, (right) of the Association pre
sents a check covering the amount of the scholarship to Dewey
F. Barich, president of the Institute as Claude Wilson, 3310 Ho
garth, (right) of th.‘ Association and Calvin Spencer, Jr., 4481
Concord, first recipient of the scholarship, look on.
Protest Dismissal
Os Ala. Professor
MONTGOMERY, Ala. The Southern Conference Ed
ucational Fund called on state officials to rescind the firing
of Dr. L. D. Reddick, Alabama State College professor, “in
the interest of academic freedom and the future of educa
tion in Alabama ”
Dr. Reddick was dismissed on
order of Governor John Patter
son and the State Board of Edu
cation. He had been head of the
History Department at Alabama
State for six years.
The fired professor has been an
outspoken supporter of student
protests against segregation. He
is a close associate of Dr. Marlin
Luther King, Jr., and author' of
a biography of Dr. King, "Crusad
plish."
Addressing himself to the tasks
of the day, the NAACP leader
called upon both the Democratic
and Republican parties to adopt
civil rights planks which “de
clare the clear and mandatory
role of the federal government
in the many-sided segregation
process. Federal responsibility in
this area,” he asserted, “has been
obscured in these past six years
by a succession of incredible and
inept pronouncements on the ex
ecutive level of government, as
well as by a mean and ruthless
campaign by the know nothings
on the local, state and congres
sional levels.
“Equivocation by party lead
ers, Democratic or Republican,
on the civil rights issue will in
sure equivocation of Negro voters
in the choosing of party designees
■ “ ‘ IUAn -”
er Without Violence."
Governor Patterson charged Dr.
Reddick with being an “agitator
and communist sympathizer.” Dr. j
I Reddick denied communist affilia
tions and said the Governor was
trying to “divert attention from
the political and financial pro
blems that he faces.”
In a letter to the Governor, the
S.C.E.F. said the firing was
“symptomatic of the current tra
gic atmosphere which is stripping
the South's schools and colleges
of some of its best minds and
its best teachers.” The Fund
wrote:
“The communist charges arc
the same old smoke screen behind
which defenders of the status
quo in the South seek to destroy
any person who works for change
... I know you cannot agree
with Dr. Reddick’s ideas because
he does not believe in segrega
tion. But you must see that if you
I drive from our schools and col
leges every person who thinks for
nimsclf you will destroy edu
cation itself. The forcing of
teachers to conform to state poll
| cics is an accepted practice un
der totalitarian governments; it
has no place in a democracy . . .
"Recently we have seen one of
our great universities, Vander
bilt in Nashville almost destroyed
because its best teachers refused
to work in an atmosphere where
i freedom of conscience was denied.
Outstanding Negro teachers have
recently been fired at state col
’ leges in Florida and Kentucky.
There is no way of guessing how
many superior teachers have left
the South quietly and voluntarily
In recent years because they could
not continue to function where
freedom of expression was stifl
led...
“The ultimate losers are our
young people—and. of course, our
democracy which to survive must
! have citizens trained to think.
SINGLE COPY, 10 CENTS; PER YEAR, $4.50
C&IMe Grads Refused
VvJ.iy ation
ALBANY, Ga.—(Special)—A case is being heard by
District Judge William Bootle in which five Negro com
plainants have made charges to the Justice Department
that a pattern of racial discrimination is being followed
in Terrell County. Ga. to deny Negroes the right to vote.
Freedom Festival
Boxing Match
Moved to Thurs.
A “tripleheader” outdoor box
ing match scheduled for Tuesday
in the University of Detroit sta
dium was postponed to Thursday
because of a steady afternoon
rain.
The fight headlined by a 10-
round middleweight bout between
Detroit’s own, Henry Hank and
Victor Zalazar of Argentina is
being held in conjunction with
the Detroit Windsor Freedom Fes
tival activities.
The program was delayed two
days by matchmaker Harry Bax
ter to avoid conflict with the
televising of the Carmen Basilio-
Gene Fullmer middleweight title
bout.
George Moore vs. Wayne Be
thea and Billy Flamio vs. Ronnie
Cohen in 10 rounders to complete
the triple bill.
Detroit Citizens Report On
Physical Education Study
Twenty - five Detroit Citizens!
wrote finis to a nine month study'
of the health and physical edu
cation program of the Detroit
Public Schools Tuesday when/Dr.
James J. Lightbody presented a
82 recommendation report to the
Detroit Board of Education.
Appointed by the Board of;
Education in August of 1959. the
Advisory Committee on Health j
Education and Physical Fitness,
under the chairmanship of Dr.
Lightbody. was charged with
studying this phase of the educa
tional program and with recom
mending a well-balanced physical
education plan for the boys and
March On Political
Confab Ready
A. Philip Randolph announced
today that the MARCH ON THE
CONVENTIONS MOVEMENT
FOR FREEDOM NOW, which he
and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr
launched last week* was not in
tended to “block entrance” to
cither of the political conven
tions.
Mr. Randolph made his state
ment in response to a nuThber
of inquiries he said he had re
ccivc’d since the formal an
nouncement of the MARCH last
week.
In clarifying the purposes of
the mass nonviolent demon
strations in Los Angeles and
Chicago, Randolph stated that
j “this project is not a picket line
j in the conventional sense, but
a protest march. Unlike a trade
union picket line, our objective
| is not to block the entrante of
any individuals or groups into
| tl\c convention halls. Rather our
objective is dramatically to
demonstrate to both political
parties the dissatisfaction ot the
Negro with their performances
to date and to demand a spe
cific program that guarantees
freedom now.”
Mr. Randolph described the
term picket line as a "misnom
er." "In none of our statements
has Dr. King or I characterized
the project as a 'picket line.' In
deed we intended clearly to dif
ferentiate our ndeavor from
picketing when we formulated
the title MARCH ON THE CON
VENTIONS MOVEMENT FOR
FREEDOM NOW."
Mr. Randolph also reported
that the local response in Los
Angeles and Chicago to the call
for the MARCH had been ‘most
encouraging and impressive.”
Local committees, representing 1 a
broad cross-section of both, com
munities, have been established
*i»nd arc iuncLiotuag elleclivcly.
io<
Among the complainants are
Eddie G. Lowe, his wife Edna Mae
and Davey L. Gibson, all grad
! uates of New York University.
Lowe testified Tuesday that he
was refused registration on the
grounds that he could not write,
while Mrs. Lowe, who holds a
Master's Degree, was refused reg
istration because she could not
read.
Gibson was disqualified on a
literacy test because he mispro
! nounced the word “original.” All
; three were disqualified by reg
istrar James G. Raines, whom
Lowe reported parts of the Unit
ied States Constitution too fast
»for him to copy them and satisfy
requirements of a writing test.
Lowe said he was "shocked"
when told by the registrar that
he had failed the test.
The Justice Department has
asked Bootle to appoint a Federal
voting referee, the first such
! in the South since Reconstruction
days, to serve in Terrell County.
The suit, being heard without a
j jury, was brought under United
I States civil rights laws.
girls of the Detroit schools. Their
recommendations span health and
physical education for the ele
mentary through the junior and
senior high schools of the city.
Divisions of the report cover
curriculum, personnel, school,
plant and health services.
Fact finding was done, stated
Dr Lightbody, by visiting schools
interviewing the people respon
sible for the physical education
program and inspecting the phy
sical facilities of the schools. A
questionnaire survey, circulated
throughout the school system
with no names involved was
used to get an overall picture of
the present program Suggestions
were also solicited for the ideal
pro e ram. Experts in this field,
both from the Detroit schools and
from outsi 'e agencies, served as
consultants for the nine-month
study. Dr. James D. Berry of the
Detroit schools served as execu
tive secretary.
A health education study, as
well as the physical activity as*
pect of the education program
was considered of top importance
by the committee and it under*
lined a recommendation for a
semester course in healthful I ly
ing five days a week in junior
high school and again in senior
high school, as a required subject.
Course content was specifically
outlined in the report.
"Instruction in healthful living
is recognized as a universal need,”
pointed out the committee, "and
the school shares with the home
and the community the responsi
bility to guide young people to
ward psychological and emotional
soundness.”
To give more youngsters a
chance to participate in intra
mural sports programs, the com
mittee underwrote at least one
I clock hour immediately after the
regular school day for all second
ary schools. The philosophy of
the committee was. that out of a
, strong intramural program where
a maxium number of boys and
girls are allowed to participate,
would come the material for the
j inter scholastic contests. They
i structured an ideal program
around regular class, intramural
and inter-scholastic sports.
In surveying the junior high
schools, the committee recom
mended students be included in
I inter-scholastic competition on a
voluntary but organized basis at
I the end of the intramural season,
j This, they emphasized should be
| under the direction and guidance
!of the Health and Phyrical Edu
! cation Department of the Detroit
j schools.
• a e
Other recommendations will be
revealed in this newspaper next

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