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The Detroit tribune. (Detroit, Mich.) 1935-1966, August 31, 1963, Image 1

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m #wr Divine Publisher Crusader Far The Invincible Triumphant Divine Rights of Man I II £
VOLUME 41—NUMBER 39
THE TWO' WEATHERS:
by Andrew F. Fmeheuf, CS +++
Droughts, Hurricanes, Floods:
DEVIL'S ADAM-EVE LORD GOD'S! (Gen. 2:7.
etc.) EXCESS RAIN. HEAT. COLD OF SATAN
BOUND: EUROPEAN RELIGIOUS CRIPPLES I
IMPURE: THERAPEUTICS I EDUCATION 1...
THE UNIVERSE IS 100% OF THOUGHT 1
God's Christ Scientist- THE REAL:
"IN ATMOSPHERE OF LOVE DIVINE, WE LIVE.
AND MOVE, AND BREATHE/' AND HAVE OUR BEING!
- CHRISTIAN SCIENCE HYMN.
LUST VOIDED! - "FEAR" P. 586 S&H.
HEAVEN AT HAND WITHIN YOU ! EX-C-LU-
S-l-V-E R-E-A-L I-T-Y OF GOD'S HEAVEN AND ETERNAL
LIFE NO BIRTHS ! DEATHS, SIN, MATTER, HELL AND
THEIR FATHER THE DEVIL GIGANTIC ADAM-EVE
FRAUDS M-Y-T-H-S ! Gen. 1:27: "MALE & FEMALE"
IN O N E AS PER C-H I-L-D-L-E-S-S JESUS ! AND GREAT
EST MARY, BAKER EDDY'S 40 PLUS OF 89 YEARS I
V. 31: "AND GOD SAW E-V-E-R-Y THING THAT HE
ITHE ONE R-E-A-L PARENT) CREATOR HONORED
BY THE C-H I-L-D-L-E-S-S CHRIST JESUS)] HAD MADE,
AND, BEHOLD, IT WAS [ I S ] VERY GOOD" 1
"FREEDOM CARRIES RESPONSIBILITY"
SUPERB CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
EDITORIAL, Aug. 9 - JAPANESE-AMERICAN
CHRISTIAN TO NEGROES. „ f
On another part of this page appears an editorial ar
ticle written by a Japanese-American who can sympathize
with grievances of the American Negro but who at the
same time has some valid advice.
Many newspapers have undertaken in recent years
to avoid identifying as Negroes, or members of other mi
nority races, persons arrested for crime. This is generally
in the interests of fairness. But it tends also to erase a
measure of group responsibility.
A WOMAN WRITES IN A LETTER TO A MEMBER
OF THE STAFF OF THIS NEWSPAPER, "WE SEE PIC
TURES OF THE WEEPING WIFE AND MOTHER OF MED
GAR EVERS BUT WE DO NOT SEE PICTURES OF THE
WEEPING MOTHER OF A 15-YEAR-OLD WHITE GIRL
RAPED BY SIX NEGRO TEEN-AGERS, OR THE MOTHERS
OF THE WHITE MAN OR THE SOLDIER KILLED BY
NEGROES"
(See FREEDOM, Page 2)
"A NISEI SPEAKS TO NEGROES"
[ln An Intelligent, Christian Spirit]
The Christian Science Monitor, Aug. 9
We feel it is difficult indeed for us Nisei to really
appreciate the suffering and agony of our Negro Amer
icans.
* + *
We have had the pleasure of meeting some outstand
ing Negro leaders.
* * *
Some of our respected Negro leaders, too, often pre
sent themselves as being small.
They will tell you the reason that there is a large
number of crimes being committed by the Negroes is be
cause the colored people are not equally treated. They
w 'll tell you that the reason why there are more Nbgro
dropouts from high schools is because the colored child
fen are not given opportunity to follow the kind of wor
*Hey want after graduation.
(See SPEAKS, Page 2)
'"YOU'VE GOT TO BE TAUGHT TO HATE. .
N.Y. Trib., Aug. 14
By FRED FERRETI
The man was on vacation and he went to Cunning am
Park Queens with his three-year-old son.
Cunningham Park is a nice park. It has long an w
kc P» stretches of grass, some fairly fes* coo [ '
shaded picnic areas, a few softball diamonds A me®
Park.
* * *
He bought an orange drink, dipped in * wo • tra **
it to his son. He bought a cola for himself and they
*•* on a bench outside the stand. There were two ome
P* r fons there together, a Negro man and a little g r .
was a quiet day and business was slow.
The remark came with sickening suddenness. e
(See HATE, Page 2)
SATURDAY, AUGUST 31, 1963
Wilkins’ Trial Set
Little Stock Prospers
Following Integration
X, 5 '•' - —v-i-' l '
I
I- t .. '?*.
Attorney Questions Federal
Concern For Law And Order
ALBANY, Ga. A local Neg
ro attorney has questioned the
seriousness of the federal govern
ment’s concern for law and or
der.
Albany attorney, C. B. King
issued a statement concerning
the nine members of the Albany
Movement indicted by a federal
grand jury in Maccgi, August 9
Six persons were charged with
perjury before the grand jury
and three were chaged with ob
structing justice.
The charges were instituted by
Justice Department action in con
nection with a boycott and pick
et against a white grocery store
owner in Macon who is also a
federal grand juror. King said.
ITTA BENA. Mias.—Aug 20
Eleven Negro residents here in
dicate white employers are at
tempting to force out of the state
any Negro who seeks his rights.
The eleven men said they have
been told they will not be tfiTcn
back their Jobs if they partici
pate in civil rights work.
Four of the rights workers
had been working at Mississippi
vocational College, an all Negro
In Mississippi Case
VICE PRESIDENT JOHNSON
' MijM''''JitiHilSflMr^
jjEm
l' Bjjj^
Wtu 3«-S ~
Treasury Secretary Douglas
Dillon third from loft) spon
sored a recaption last week hon- j
orlng Dr. Samuel Westerfield, j
Jr. (extreme right), his Senior
Economic Advisor, who has just
Rights Fighters Lose Jobs
SINGLE COPY, TEN CENTS; PER YEAR $4.50
HOUSTON, Texas Detroit
Mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh
watched es Vice President Lyn
don B. Johnson added his signa
ture to a resolution passed un
animously by representatives of
13,500 cities in the United
States endorsing Detroit's bid
for the 1968 Olympic Games.
The resolution, assures Detroit
the support and cooperation of
the U.S. cities.
The resolution said, " —that
the American Municipal As
sociation affirms its intense
interest in the selection of the
United States end Detroit, Mich,
as the site for the 1968 Olym
pic Games, and offers its pledge
of support end cooperation to
the Detroit Olympic Commit
tee —" Hundreds of other dele
gates in attendance et the AMA
Congress added their signa*
tures to the resolution.
The purpose of the Grand
Jury hearing seemed to be dir
ected towards establishing that
a local boycott of a white groc
ery store owner, because of his
hiring policies and general mis
treatment of Negro customers,
was really instituted because of
his verdict against a Negro who
sued for damages in Federal
Court, after having been brutal
ized by the Sheriff of Baker
County. Other white store own
ers with similar policies had
also been boycotted, and even
today a selective purchasing pol
icy is in force.
King contrasted inaction in the
face of “the incessant indigni
ties, the constant violence, and
bean namad Deputy Assistant |
Secretary of State for Economic !
Affairs. Joining in the convtr- i
setion (left to right) ero Mr.
Roy Davenport, Special Assir
tent to the Under Secretary I
school near Itta Bena They were
told by the school’s chief ad
ministrator, President John H.
White, that they would prohab
ly be able to get their jobs back
if they gave up the movement.
White told them, “By your
protesting, a cloud has moved
between the white and colored
in Itta Beoa. If you continue to
wear your civil rights buttons
and going to mattings, bow can
MAYOR CAVANAGH
the multiplicity of constitutional
deprivations to Negroes.” with its
aggressive approach, lead by the
Justice Department, in indicting
Albany Movement leaders in this
case.
The Albany attorney was beat
en over the head with a wooden
can by Dougherty County’s white
sheriff. D. C. Campbell in July,
1962. The incident and the sher
iff’s statement that he would
do it again, wore widely public
ized, but no action was taken
against the sheriff.
King finished his statement
with the remark. “As cogently
stated by an elderly member of
the Albany Negro community,
‘Even the federal government is
a white man.’ ”
of tha Army (Parsonnel), U S.
District Judga Marjorie Lawson,
and Mrs. Westerfield
Sacratary Dillon oxprassad
"graat pridt In tho fact that
It was tha Traasury Dapartmant
you expect to clear the cloud.”
According to Scott Harris, one
of the group, all the people who
were on the County Work Farm
will be “marked men” in Itta
Bena. But. Harris said. “I’m not
going to give up the freedom
fight. Til never go hack begging
for a job. If I have to leave
town, then I’ll find a job some
place else.”
The eleven were pert of e
970 GRATIOT, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 48207
Under the leadership of local
women and businessmen, Little
Rock, Arkansas, once the sym
bol of intolerance, is now pros
pering after dealing with its in
tegration problems in a way that
may provide a blueprint for oth
er cities facing similar crises.
How this “remarkable moral
I and economic comeback’’ was
achieved is reported by Joe Al
i ex Morris in a September Read
j er’s Digest article, “Little Rock
I Finds a Better Way.”
The city is blooming again ec
onomically Building construction
doubled from 21 million dollars
in 1961 to 43 million in 1962.
Department store sales jumped
eight per cent in the first half
of 1963. Seven new plants are
being built or are scheduled for
construction in the city’s hand
some industrial park.
In 1957, recalls Morris, bitter
racial prejudice inflamed by am
bitious politicians plunged a lead
erless Little Rock into fear and
mob violence and threatened eco
nomic disaster for the eommun
! ity. in 1968. city parks, golf
courses, motion picture theaters,
buses, baseball park, hospital, li
brary the largest downtown store
lunch counters and rest rooms,
the big hotels, the local medical
society and the schools are whol
' ly or partly integrated.
Some “white” churches have
opened their doors to Negroes.
Visiting African officials have
been welcomed —and often en
tertained without discrimina
tion in “notorious” Little Rock.
This year the Arkansas Travel
ers baseball team became the
property of the Philadelphia
Phillies organization and ac
quired a Negro player. When
he won a game with a home run,
ho got a standing ovation
'Freedom Now'
which brought Dr. Westerfiefd
to Washington," and "provided
him with high-level experience
necessary to fulfill the respon
sibilities of his new, top pol
icy post."
group of 45, ranging in age
from 15 to 75 years, who were
arrested when they sought po
lice protection after the bomb
ing of a voter registration meet
ing at Hopewell Baptist Church
here.
The 45 are free on bond raised
by the National Council ofl
Churches. The Justice Depart
ment has appealed the case to
iht ruth Circuit Court.
JACKSON, Miss. The trial
of Roy Wilkins, executive sec
retary of the National Associa
tion for the Advancement of
Colored People, on charges of
interfering with trade has been
tenatively set for Sept. 9.
Mr. Wilkins was arrested here
on June 1 as he led an anti-seg
regation demonstration sponsor
ed by the NAACP branch in
Jackson lie was released under
SI,OOO bond.
The charge against the NAACP
leader is a felony and was in
voked for the first time during
the demonstrations with his ar
rest. Arrested with Mr. Wilkins
and charged with the same of
fense were Mcdgar W r . Evers,
NAACP field secretary for Mis
sissippi, and Miss Helen Wilch
er.
The three were carrying plac
ards urging people not to buy
from merchants on Capitol St.
because of their discriminatory
pradices. Conviction carries a
maximum penalty of SIO,OOO.
considerably stiffer than for the
previous charges of trespass and
breach of the peace.
When the case comes to trial,
one of the original defendants
will be missing Medgar W.
Evers, who was assassinated from
ambush on the night of June
12 as he returned to his home
after a mass rally in support
of the demonstrations.
Mr. Wilkyi* and Miss Wilcher
will bo represented at the trial
by NAACP General Counsel.-
Robert L. Carter of New York
City and Jack Young, NAACP
lawyer in Jackson.
INTEGRA TIONISTS
FACE DEATH
PENALTY IN GA.
AMERICUS, Georgia at
least four integration workers
have been arrested and charged
with “attempting to incite insur
rection”, a capitol crime. The
four. Ralph Allen, John Pcrdew,
and Don Harris of SNCC and
Zev Aclony of CORE are held
without bail.
The charge of insurrection was
last filed in the ‘3o’s against
members of the communist par
ty.
Drive Wins Jobs
In 23 Stores
LEXINGTON, Kv Direct ac
tion together with a selective
buying campaign has gained jobs
for Negroes in 23 major down
town stores within a month The
stores have already hired from
one to 12 Negroes each and arc
expected tohirc more in the im
mediate future.
mm ‘ * \ h ' : ‘ ‘-S* _' ‘ v
Ki . 'a
Sr iMi'-syK I '--'
1 'ill, it
Dr. Joseph Harrison Jack
son, President of tht National
Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc.,
issued an official call for its
•3rd annual sossion, Septem
bar 38th In Cleveland, Ohio.
Ovor 20,000 delegates aro ex
pected to attond from 50 statos
and 7 foreign countries.
Dr. Jackson has boon presi
dent of the Convention since
IW3.

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