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The Detroit tribune. (Detroit, Mich.) 1935-1966, September 28, 1963, Image 1

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VOLUME 41 NUMBER 4„
THE TWO’WEATHERS: I
by Andrew F. Fruehauf, CS. +++
Droughts, Hurricanes, Floods:
DEVIL'S ADAM-EVE LORD GOD'S I (Gen. 2:7.
etc.) EXCESS RAIN. HEAT. COLD OF SATAN
BOUND: EUROPEAN RELIGIOUS CRIPPLES I
IMPURE: THERAPEUTICS I EDUCATION!...
THE UNIVERSE IS 100% OF THOUGHT I
God's Christ Scientist —THE REAL:
"IN ATMOSPHERE OF LOVE DIVINE. WE LIVE.
AND MOVE, AND BREATHE/' AND HAVE OUR BEING I—
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE HYMN.
LUST VOIDED! - "FEAR" P. 586 S&H.
HEAVEN AT HAND WITHIN YOU ! EX-C-LU-
S-l-V-E R E A L I T Y OF GOD'S HEAVEN AND ETERNAL
LIFE NO BIRTHS I DEATHS, SIN, MATTER, HELL AND
THEIR FATHER THE DEVIL GIGANTIC ADAM-EVE
FRAUDS M-Y-T-H-S ! Gen. 1:27: "MALE & FEMALE"
IN O N E AS PER C-H-l L-D-L-E-S-S JESUS ! AND GREAT
EST MARY, BAKER EDDY'S 40 PLUS OF 89 YEARS I
V. 31: "AND GOD SAW E-V-E-R-Y THING THAT HE
[THE ONE R-E-A-L PARENT 1 CREATOR HONORED
BY THE C-H-l-L-D-L-E-S-S CHRIST JESUS I] HAD MADE,
AND, BEHOLD, IT WAS l-l-S-1 VERY GOOD" !
FREE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE LECTURES,
FERNDALE: William Henry Alton, Church, 2101
Livernois, 8 p.m., Sat., Sept. 28.
ANN ARBOR: William Henry Alton, Church, 1833
Washtenaw Ave.; 3:30 p.m., Sun., Sept 29.
PLYMOUTH: Otto Bertschi, Church, 1100 W. Ann
Arbor Trail, 4 p.m., Sun., Sept. 29.
YPSILANTI: Otto Berschi, High School, W. Cross and
N. Washington Sts. 8 p.m., Tues., Oct. 1.
DETROIT (First Church): Otto Bertschi, Community
Arts Auditorium, Wayne State University, 8 p.m., Thurs.,
Oct. 3.
WYANDOTTE: JUIpJ W. Cessna, Abraham Lincoln
Junior High School, 4460 18th St., 8 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 3.
BLOOMFIELD HILLS (auspices First Church, Frank
lin-Meadowlake): William Milford Correll, Bloomfield Hills
Junior High School, 4200 Ouartoon Rd., 8:15 p.m., Fri.,
Oct. 4.
ROCHESTER: Ralph W. Cessna, West Junior High
School, Old Perch Rd., 3:30 p.m., Sat., Oct. 5.
FARMINGTON: Otto Bertschi, Junior High School, 33000
Thomas St. 3 p.m., Sun., Oct. 6.
NO COLLECTIONS EVER.
N. Y. TEACHER'S STRIKE AVERTED!
GOD'S DETROIT TRIBUNE AID THERETO:
FOUR TAT' PIECES OF MAIL, TO VIP* June 29,
35c each. PROPHET OF VIRGIN BIRTH FAME, ISAIAH,
RE THE POWER OF THE WORD:'
'SHALL PROFIT WHERETO IT IS SENT' !
COMMENDATION FOR REV. SAVAGE,
PASTOR OF BAPTIST CHURCH, PONTIAC.
APPEARANCE ON "CRUSADE FOR CHRIST,"
TV, AUG. 6.
A SUPERB, FATHERLY, BROTHERLY, 5_ HRIS TL Y
ADMONITION AND GUIDANCE TO TEENAGERS TO
AVERT 'HELL' AND/OR "FOOL'S PARA J‘ S *L.
AND PERHAPS NOT THOUGHT OF BY THE DEA
PASTOR GOOD FOUNDATION W ° RR JO MA
GOD'S HIGHEST CHOSEN, CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS
OF E-V-E-R-Y ONE ! CHRIST JESUS, NO. 1
See pp. 9, 192 GOD'S CHRISTIAN SCIENCE TEXTBOOK
for th. REAL ! - PROTECTOR, LIBERATOR OF
BIBLES I CLERGY ! E-V-E-R-Y ONE l
[ "Brighten The Corner Where You Are' J
"ROMNEY IN '6B" SAYS LOS ANGELES VOICE
Readers Write, The Christian Science Monitor, Sept. 13
TO THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR:
I'm for Romney In 1968! Perhaps I m ta mg
dim and negative view in not wanting if" .
President in 1964, hot I feel that he stands a be
of winning the 1968 election., .
On. who ...k. God', guidanc. cont.nu.My know.
best when he can do the most good or our c
nation needs a men of his cal'ber for rest er ,
u* not push him or force him to run n * xt yt,r ' had
prove himself first the finest Governor
just as he proved to be the right man to po •
P«ny up from the brink of bankruptcy.
Los Angeles *"*• E * Modl " #
m I UtlKUll rUDLiV/
owr Father Mother Oeeli" eur Divine Publisher Crwsedec For The Invincible Triumphant Divine Rights es Man
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1963
In Birmingham Again
BOMBS STRIKE
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N.J. Racial Picture
Dismal and Explosive
• TRENTON, N.J. Determin
ed efforts by governmental agen
cies at all levels, Federal, State
and local, arc required to deal
with a racial situation in New
Jersey described as “explosive,
according to a report released
today by the New Jersey Ad
visory Committee to the' United
States Commission on Civil
Rights. In its report to the Com
mission in Washington the New
Jersey Committee reviews' the
problems of housing, employment
opportunities and apprenticeship
training, and finds a “dismal
picture of opportunity for Ne
groes” in the State.
During the year in which the
report was being prepared, the
11-member committee of New
Jersey citizens conducted pub
lie meetings in Camden and
Trenton, attended hearings of
the parent Commission on Civil
Rights in Newark, and under
took extensive interviewing In
order to gather current informa
tion on its three fields of in
terest.
In employir nt as well as in
housing the existing statutory
prohibitives against discriniina
tion have been ineffective. Al
though New Jersey law requires
a nondiscrimination clause in
all contracts involving public con
struction, the Committee finds
UM Prof. Says " Business Seeks
Negro Managers And Executives"
ANN ABOR More Amer
ican firms arc seeking Negro
college graduates to fill future
managerial and executive posi
tions —but there just aren t
enough qualified applicants.
"Even though a shortage of
job opportunities in the , past
may have discouraged Negroes
from obtaining the appropriate
’ducational qualifications, c et"
ainly this shortage no longer
xists in American business to- (
Jay, said Arthur S. Hann, ad
mnistrative assistant to the dean
f The University of Michigan
Jruduate' School of Business Ad
ninistration.
While it would be difficult
to estimate the number of jobs
in American business available
to qualified Negroes, Hann said
he has received "several dozen”
requests for Negro graduates
during the past ‘‘few mdnths.”
But the problem, Hann point
ed out. is that at the present
the School's placement office
has no Negro candidates to re
fer to the companies seeking Ne
gro graduates. Nor does the
School have more than two or
three Negroes currently enrolled
in degree programs who mignt
become candidates in tne near
future. , ,
Hann added that placement
officers of other leading schools
of business administration also
arc faced with a similar situa
970 GRATIOT AVENUE, DETROIT, MICHIGAN
that numerous public buildings
arc constructed in the State,
sometimes with Federal as well
as State funds, with not one Ne
gro employed above the menial
, level. The Committee found both
; employers and unions Fespon*
siblc, the former because of
passive attitudes toward employ
ing Negroes in non-traditional
jobs, and the unions because
of exclusionary practices insur
ing that Negroes will never at
tain membership necessary to
livelihood in these occupations.
The Committee recommends
legislation forbidding expendi
ture of public monies unless there
is “solid evidence that existing
clauses- against discrimination
have been honored.” It recom
mends, in this connection that,
"The presence of a reasonable,
not token, number of nonwhites
and Puerto Ricans should be ac
cepted as evidence of compli
ane.” .
Other recommendations urge a
change in the State’s fair employ
ment practices law to require
the hiring of ‘‘a reasonable num
ber” of minority workers, and
reforms in the guidance counsel
ling practices in the schools ‘‘to
include a study of the appren
ticeship and employment oppor
tunities for minority group mem
bers” in the training of coun
sellors.
tion. i
Said Hann, “Recent studies
indicate that about 85 per cent
of the younger college-trained
generation of business executives
in the U S. have come from three
educational fields business
administration and economics;
engineering; and law. And stu
dents who arc degree candidates
in these fields are the ones who
are being intensively recruited atj
the present time by business
firms.
gjF^sß
Traffic Judgi Andrew C.
Wood, right, and. Mr*. Vara
Naal Edwards engaged In ser
ious consideration of the Im
portance of traffic In Detroit.
Judge Wood wea speaker at
The Atkinson Avenue Im
provement Association award
ed certificates to City Council
members James Brickley; Ed
ward Connor; Mary V. Beck
and William T. Patrick, Jr. at
a recent program of an Assosi
ation committee.
Mrs. Elizebeth Banton pre
sented the citations on behalf
of her friends and neighbors.
Negro For Mayor
In Albany, Georgia
ALBANY, Ga. Mr. Sla
ter King. Acting President of
th c Albany Movement, an
nounced that he has quali
fied as a candidate to run
for Mayor of this city in the
October 15, 1963 election.
Mr. King, a Negro, stated
that, “In spite of the many
instances of police brutality
against the Negroes of Al
bany, I still have faith in this
city where 1 have lived all
my life, and believe that there
are many people who desire
for there to be a better and
more humane city govern
ment.’’
On July 23, 1962, Mrs. Sla
ter King, wife of the candi
date, was kicked down and
knocked unconscious while
she was in the seventh month
of pregnancy. Her baby was
stillborn one month later.
“Yet the number of Negroes
enrolled in these fields at the
U-M is negligible, and I under
stand there is also limited or
negligible Negro enrollment in
these fields in other leading
universities.
"It now behooves Negroes who
aspire to managerial and leader
ship positions in business and
industry to obtain the kind of
educational training which the
business world generally requires
of candidates for these positions/'
a Wednesday Noon Luncheon
Mooting of tho 800 ko r T.
Washington Businas* Associa
tion In tho Groat Lakes Build
ing. Woodward at fuel Id in
Detroit.
SINGLE COPY, TEN CENTS; PER YEAR $4.50
Negro Homes Damaged; JFK
Peace Team Greets Whites
Tribune Bulletin
Birmingham, Ala. Sept. 25 Very near the time
of the arrival of President Kennedy’s “Peace Team” in
this city two bombs exploded. Homes of Negroes were
damaged; a huge hole was blown in the earth and a utility
pole was sheared off at the bottom. It appeared that.sticks
of dynamite had been thrown from a passing car.
Services For
Child Victims
Across Country
NEW YORK From Boston
to San Diego, Calif., and from
Daytona Beach, Fla., to Anchor
age, Alaska, memorial services,
silent parades and other forms
of mourning were held Sept.,
21-22, for the victims of the Bir->
minghara bombing.
Four young children were kill
ed when a bomb was hurled in
to the Sixteenth Street Baptist
Church in Birmingham during
1 the Sunday School period on the
morning of Sept. 15. Later in
the day, two Negro teenagers
were wantonly slain, one by a
police bullet and the other by
white teenagers.
In Boston, Orzell Billingsley,
a Birmingham lawyer who has
participated in Jim Crow cases,
addressed an outdoor rally, Sept.
22, mourning the slaughter of
the innocent children. A crowd
of from 15,000 to 20,000 attend
ed. Billingsley has been associat
ed with Arthur Shores, promi
nent Birmingham attorney, whose
home has been bombed twice
recently.
Mrs. Medgar W. Evers, widow
of the Mississippi State NAACP
lield secretary shot down last
June by a segregationist's bul
let fired from ambush, spoke
at a meeting in Cleveland, Ohio,
Sepi. 22.
In Kansas City. Kans., a memor
ial service was held on the coun
ty courthouse steps, Sept. 22.
More than 2,000 citizens of all
races attended.
In Los Angeles a “death
march” was held on Sept. 22
from City flail to the Federal
Building.
Hartford. Conn., observod a
i midnight vigil the night of the
bombing. The demonstration last
ed throughout the night until
8:30 Monday morning. Over 2,000
persons participated in a “march
of concern” on Sept. 22.
Approximately 16 white and
Negro church congregations in
Levittown, N.J., are raising funds
to aid the Birmingham light, in
addition to holding memorial
services.
In Daytona Beach, Fla., a
memorial march planned for
Sept. 22 was to include memorial
services in the midst of the
march.
Several actions were held in
Portland, Ore., including memor
ial services, two memorial march
es and a rally.
Memorial services and march
es were also held in a host of
other cities, including Middle
town. Conn.; Portland. Ore.; Sac
remento, Calif.; and Buffalo, N.-,
Y.
Also, Seattle, Wash ; San Di
ego, Calif.; Hot Springs and N.
Little Kock, Ark.; Louisville, Ky ;
Columbus, O.; Cambridge, Mass.;
Clarksdalc, Miss.; Philadelphia,
Pa.; Charleston, W. Va.; New
London, Conn, and others.
Burnett Booed at WMU
Governor Ross Barnett of Mis*
issippi was roundly booed during
the course of his address to mem
bers of the student body at Wes
tern Michigan University, Kala
mazoo, Michigan.
Governor Barnett attacked the
Kennedy administration for "a
conspiracy to mongrelize the
man race through integration.”
10c
No one was reported in*
jured in the blasts although
windows were broken, cars
parked at the curb and in
driveways were mutilated,
and the walls of homes were
shattered.
The bombing was taken
calmly. There was no ex
citement and crowds did not
gather.
The charges were set off
across town from Sixteenth
Street Baptist Church where
four Negro girls: Cynthia
Wesley, Addie Collins, Den
ise McNair, and Carol Rob
ertson were killed and 23
other children wounded
when dynamite exploded
September 15 in or near the
! Sunday School Room.
* * *
Two men named by Pres
ident Kennedy as his special
team to work for peace in
Birmingham were met at the
airport by white citizens
and officials. Not a single
Negro was present upoh
their arrival. Apparently
they had not been advised
of the flight schedule.
The presidential repre
sentatives ex-West Point
Coach Earl Blaik and for
mer Army Secretary Ken
neth C. Royall said, “We
can formulate no plans un
til we can learn what the
situation is.” They also said
there were no plans to com
municate with newspapers,
radio or television during
their stay in Birmingham
“Because we are here to
participate in a local matter.”
"Press For Civil
Bights ' Mitchell
COLUMBUS. Ohio Members
of Congress who approach the
coming fight on civil rights legis
lation with “faint hearts and
pussyfoot boots.” must not be
permitted to weaken the pend
ing bill. Clarence Mitchell, di
rector of the NAACP Washing
ton Bureau, said here.
Cross Burned In
Amityville, NY
AMITYVILLE. NY. A
cross was burned on the front
lawn of the office of Dr. Eu
gene T. Reed, president of
the New York State NAACP,
early Sunday morning, Sept.
22.
A crudely written note was
found on his doorstep. It
read: “We ain’t going to your
Niger school. Down with
NAACP.”
Dr. Reed, a dentist, has
been active in the fight to
end de facto school segrega
tion in this Long island town.
The ch>ss, standing three
feet high, was bound in rags
soared in gasoline. It was
discovered blazing by • pass
erby about 2 a in.

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