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The Olneyville times. (Olneyville [Providence, R.I.]) 1887-1917, June 09, 1911, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92064044/1911-06-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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Mhe Olneyville Times
B ¥ BLEY,
BLNEYVILLE, L
CALLING THE COWS.
Two Wisconsin boys are credited
with putting the phonograph to a new
use, says the Cleveland Plain Dealer.
The instrument the boys utilize has
been so manipulated and strengthened
that it will call the cows home at
night. Attached to the pasture fence,
ft remarks at regular Intervials,
“Come, Bos!"” and the bovine grazers,
even at the uttermost limits of the
field, are sald to heed the mechanical
order and methodically obey it. In
the meantime the clever boys are re
lieved of a long walk and much stub
born driving. Naturally, it will at
once be assumed that this useful in
strument can be utilized in other prac
tical ways. It might even prove a
boon for that unhappy Arkansas farm- l
er who, having lost his voice, called
his hogs by beating on a tree trunk
with a stick—and was dreadfully an
noyed by the imitative woodpeckers.
Of course, we can't help regarding the
new caller as an arrant enemy to ro
mance and sentiment. Calling home
the cows, “out of the clover and blue
eyed grass” has seemed one of the
most agreeable and poetical of bu
colic chores, and the spectacle of the
typical hired man, sitting on the fence
beside a phonograhpic announcer, and
letting the patient instrument do all
the work, is a sad and even deplorable
pne, l
Walnut trees are becoming scarcer
from year to year in eastern Pennsyl
vania, owing to the high prices they
command. Exporters make system
atic tours through the rural regions,
buying up all the walunt trees that
can be had. They pay $5O to $lOO
a tree, or even more if tke specimen
fs particularly attractive. A big wal
‘nut tree on the Hutchinson estate, in
Cheltenham, has just been cut down
and the timber will be shipped abroad.
A Wilmington exporter of walnut logs
bought this and other trees in the vi
ginity. These logs, it is sald, are to
be manufactured into gun stocks in
France. Formerly walnut timber was
in demand in Europe, principally for
use in making veneer for furniture.
Out of doors, fresh, daytime air is
not for the poor worker of towns or
cities. Only the rich, the leisurely, the
idle or the agricultural can enjoy this
natural precious boon of freedom. Yes,
the work of town and city is carried
on indoors. Most people, though, what
ever their occupation, could with little
trouble manage almost to sleep in out
of doors fresh air. Almost any room
with an eutside window can be kept '
full of fresh air most seasons of the ,
year. Food is expensive; air is free. |
If man had to work for fresh air as he ’
does for food, he would value it. Clean ‘
fresh air is hardly attainable at any |
price to the lodger, the tenement |
dweller and factory worker. !
——ren I
In France eleven passengers were
carried two miles in an aeroplane. If
the conquest of the air is not gained
this half of the century it will not be
for lack of effort, courage and per
severance, Still, for general use, rail- ;
roads and steamships need have no
fear of being crowded out of business.
A California judge has just decided
with some warmth that poker is not |
the great American game, but devo- |
es of the sport may take comfort
m the thought that the decision was
merely an obiter dictum.
The age of miracles is not past. A |
foreign count in Chicago, who is look: ‘
ing for an American bride, stipulates |
sBhe must be a poor girl, as he does
not believe it is right to marry for
‘money. ]
A New York shoestring peddler was ! |
.arrested the other day for onu-rin;:'
a bank and demanding 81,000,000,!
“Ask and ye shall receive” nppv:xrsl
'to have miscarried in this case. l
A war on rats hgs been declared
by the health department, but the‘
dear girls need not worry. The in
animate rats which hold forth in the’
damsels’ tresses are safe, |
A certain rick man has willed $25, I
000 worth of cigars to Columbia uni
versity. Don’'t be hasty in offering
criticism. He might have left ciga
rettes.
A lawyer in Chicago has been fined
$75 for smiting an umpire. It surprises
as to learn that an umpire is entitled
to the protection of the laws of this
fair land.
It has been proved that the Income
of the average New York lawyer is no
greater than that of a policeman or
# tradesman’s clerk. But think of the
glory!
A nine-year-old Philadelphia gir! 1
said to have compelled a nine-year-old
doy to elope with her. And yet they
say that Philadelphia is a slow town!
»
/ STAYED PANIC, :
f Why Steel Corporation Bought
Tennessee Coal and Iron,
FAVORS FEDERAL CONTROL
Challenges Statements of John W.
Gates—Government Control of Cor
porations Must Come, and the
l Sherman Law Is Archalc,
Washington.—Elbert H. Gary, chair
man of the United States Steel cor
poration directorate, told the Stanley
Steel Trust Investigating committee
that his corporation stood behind J.
i}’im'pont Mrgan in averting a disas
trous financial upheaval in 1907.
He insisted, challenging the state
ments of John W. Gates before the
committee, that the purchase by the
Steel corporation of the Tennessee
Coal and Iron company at that time
was made at a price more than it was
worth for the express purpose of pre
venting the crash of the New York
banking firm of Moore & Schley.
The United States Steel corpora
tion, according to Judge Gary, after
repeated urgings and paid 100 for a
stock which they did not consider at
the time to be worth more than 65.
The difference of 35 points represent- |
ed what the United States Steel cor
poration felt was its duty to pay to
avert the threatening panic. In all it
turned about $£30,000,000 over to the
firm of Moore & Schley and enabled
them to weather the gtorm.
Gary related a dramatic story of the
momentous events which preceded
the absorption of the Tennessee con
cern. He described in detail how hv!
and Henry C. Frick, at the instance !
of Morgan, had revealed the plan of
buying the company at a price great
er than its value, to President Roose
velt and Mr. Root, then Secretary of
State. He told how he had conclud
ed, after their ilnterview with Mr.
Roosevelt, that any Government
prosecution of their act would have
been an “outrage.” l
Gary made many surprising state
ments during his eight hours’ exami
nation, but none more startling than
his declaration that Government con
trol and publicity of corporations in
this country must come. He said
that, through the American Iron and
Steel institute, the heads of the steel
industry were trving to steer a course
between the Sherman Anti-Trust law,
which he characterized as “archaic.”
on the one hand, and the old-time
methods of destructive competition
on the other, in order to operate for
the public welfare.
TAFT DISPUTES GARY. !
Sherman Law Not Antiquated, but|
Just Being Made Useful. l
Washington.—President Taft was |
ased by some callers whether he
thought the Sherman anti-trust law
was antiquated, as suggested by Judge
Gary in his testimony in the Steel
Trust inquiry.
“No,” replied Mr. Taft, “they are
just beginning to make it useful.”
"HARRIET TUBMAN PENNILESS.
Famous Negress Taken to Home She
Founded.
!
Auburn, N. Y.~ Harriet Tubman, the ;
famous old negress who ran away out f
of slavery before the civil war and |
became the most noted “conductor of ,
the underground railroad.,” pil()tingi
over 300 slaves to freedom, has been
taken to the Harriet Tubman hmnv]
in this city ill and penniless. She |
gave her all to establish the home l'()r‘
aged colored men and women of which '
she I 8 now an inmate, ‘
She is, as nearly as can be figured,
between 45 and 100 years old. Thvl
trustees of the home are asking for |
funds to pay for a nurse to care fur!
her during her few remaining years.|
of life,
RECORD COTTON CROP.
Government Experts Expect Yield of
14,000,000 Bales.
Present indications point to this
year's cotton crop as the largest the
country ever has produced, according
to Government experts, Based on the
statistics of condition as given out
by the crop reporting board of the
Agricultural department, and on the
averages for the previous ten years,
the crop will be greater by about 2.
500,000 bales than the average, and
larger by nearly 400,000 bales than
the biggest crop the country ever
raised, that of 1904. There should be
harvested this year more than 14,000,-
000 bales,
CONFESSES TO LABOR MURDER.
Business Agent of Chicago Steamfit.
ters Admits Killing of Gentleman.
Chicago.—~Maurice Enright, busi
ness agent of the Steamfitters and
Helpers’ union, and long considered
the head of the band which has been
terrorizing the city for several months,
signed a written statement before
Police Inspector Hunt and Capt. Hal
pin, confessing to the murder of Wil
llam Gentleman in O'Malley’s saloon
May 22,
THE OLNEYVILLE TIMES.
THE COMMUTER AND HIS GARDEN.
(Prepared.)
¥it's a good thing we planted plemty of watermelon, Wyllys; the paper says
there may be a water famine this summer!”
TOBACCO TRUST GUILTY
UNDER ANTI-TRUST ACT
Supreme Court Decrees It Must
Dissolve—Given Six Months
Time.
Washington.-——The American Tobac
‘co company and its accessories and
subordinate corporations and com
panies, including the English corpora
tion, were held by the Supreme Court
of the United States to be co-opera
tors in a combination illegal under
the Sherman anti-trust act,
The corporation was heid to be in
restraint of trade and in violation of
gections 1 and 2 of the Sherman anti
trust act.
The court decreed “11. That the
combination in and of itself as well
as each and all of the elements com
posing it, whether corporate or in
dividual, whether considered collec
tively or separately, be decreed to be
in restraint of trade and an attempt
to monopolize and a monopolization
within the first and second sections
of the anti-trust act,
“2 That the court below, in order
to give effective force to our decree
in this regard, be directed to hear
parties by evidence or otherwise, as
it may be deemed proper, for the pur
pose of ascertaining and determining
upon some plan or method of dissolv
ing the combination and of recreating
out of the elements now composing
it a new condition which shall be
honestly in harmony with and not re
pugnant to the law.
“3. That for the accomplisiment of
these purposes, taking into view the
difficulty of the situaticn, a period of
gix months is allowed from the re
port of our mandate, with leave, how
ever, in the event, in the judzment of
the court below, if the neccssities of
the situation require, to extend such
period to a further time not to exceed
sixnty davs. ;
“4. That in the event, before the
expiration of the period thus fixed, a
condition of disintergation in har
mony with the law is not brought
about, either as the ronsequence of
the action of the court in determining
an issue on the subject or in accept
ing a plan agreed upon, it shall be
the duty of the court, either by way
of an injunetion restraining the move
ment of the products o the combina
tion in the channels of interstate or
foreign commerce or by the appoint
ment of a receiver, to give eflect to
the requirements of the state.”
100 KILLED IN MEXICAN TOWN.
Mob of So-Called Maderists Almost
Detroy Cholula.
Mexico City.—License rather than
liberty seems to be growing out of
the victory of the Maderists. On
every hand is evidence of disorgani
zation and lack of respect for the au
thoritieg and the law, while each day
is seeing aggravation of the rapine
and brigandage which are sweeping
the interior.
It is believed that at least 100 per
gsons have been killed.
Cholula has practically been razed
by a drunken horde calling them
selves Maderistas,
GALE SWEEPS CLEVELAND,
Seven Lives Lost and a Score of Per
sons Injured.
(leveland.—Seven dead and a score
injured was the toll of a terrific wind
and rain storm which swept over
Cleveland and vicinity, wrecking
buildings, overturning boats in Lake
Erie, tearing up trees and poles and
smashing windows and signs,
Strike In Mammoth Cave.
Glasgow, Ky.-—~The regular dally
quota of sightseers at Mammoth Cave
were turned away as the twenty-five
men who acted as guides there for
years struck because they did not like
the new manager,
Fewer Fallures In May,
New York-—Failures in May total
ing 1,096 with llabilities of $13,469 789,
according to the statistics compiled
by R. G. Dun & Co,, were an improve
ment over figures of recent months.
--Cartoon by Triggs, In New York Press.
"HARD HIKE FOR SOLDIERS,
| AMBULANCES ARE FULL
'Hundredl Fall in March from Galves
ton to Houston—The Mer
cury Reaches 106.
' Galveston, Texas.—With the ambu
‘lances filled to capacity and private
lconveyances pressed into service to
'carry the sick and footsore, the first
separate brigade of four thousand
men, General A. Mills commanding,
| struck camp at the fifty-mile point on
jits five hundred-mile hike from Gal
' veston to Houston and return. Three
"hundred men were prostrated.
- Men fell along the route bleeding at
'the nose, and others fell in convul
' sions, but the hike was pressed on,
- with the thermometer registering
i higher than it ever has at this season
of the year in the history of Texas.
The powdered limestone macadamized
roads gave forth clouds of dust, which
stifled the parched throats of the sol
diers, who did not give up until they
fell or were pulled from the ranks by
the surgeons and hospital corps men.
At times more than one-half of the
four-mile column was out of line.
Nearly a thousand of the coast artil
lerymen saw sarvice in the Spanish-
American and Philippine campaigns,
but they declared their experiences in
‘these campaigns were not to be com
pared with tnis hike.
The railroad water tanks between
‘Galveston and Houston were de
pended upon to supply water for the
"troops, but the facilities were so in
adequate that men were forced to
stand in line for hours before all of
them could be served. They broke
ranks and wandered about the farms
seeking water, and in many instances
emptied cisterns to which the owners
directed them.
The canteens were filled in the
morning and were supposed to last
until noon, but almost invariably were
empty after three hours out of camp.
Many companies were so disorgan
ized that only two meals were served,
breakfast and supper. The sixty
pound packs which the men carried
across their shoulders were aband
oned in many cases and had to be
picked up and loaded on wagons
pressed Into service for the purpose.
AFTER BUTTER AND EGG TRUST.
Judge Appoints Referee to Take Evi
dence as to Control of Prices.
Chicago.-—~Vigorous prosecution of
the Government's suit to enjoin the
Chicago butter and egg board from
controlling prices of butter and eggs
is expected to follow the recent de
cigions ¢f the United States Supreme
Court in the Oil and Tobacco Trust
cases . The first step in this direction
was taken when Judge Kohlsaat, in
the United States Circuit Court, on
motion of Federal District Attorney
Sims, referred the case to Charles B.
Morrison, who will take evidence.
It is charged that the Quotations
committee of the board hold daily ses
sions, approximate the quantity of
eggs and butter on hand, and arrange
the market price accordingly, to the
material benefit of themselves.
SECOND LORIMER PROBE.
Senators Decide Committee cn Elec
tions Should Conduct Inquiry.
Washington.—A second investiga
tion into the election of William Lori
mer of lllinois to the United States
Senate was ordered by the Senate.
Every senator .in the chamber voted
in favor of op&:lng the case.
OHIO LOS=S BRIBERY CASE.
Representative G. B. Nye Acquitted
on Charge of Soliciting $5OO.
~ Columbus.—The state lost the first
‘o( the legislative bribery cases when
Representative George B, Nye of Plke
county, was acquitted by a jury of so
liciting a $5OO bribe from State Super
visor of Public Printing E. A. Craw
ford April 18, The jury was in ses
sion only one hour and a half, Dr.
'Nn faces three other indictmenta
DRINK
ProphetSpringWater
It is unsurpassed for table use
E. E. DRAKE
156 Washington Street Providence, R. |
Purest Drugs and Best Medicines
AT
T. ROSWELL PARKER’S
5 Hartford Avenue, Near Olneyville Square
Best Brands of Cigars. Our soda is considered the finest in this section
THE L. H. MEYER CO.
[INCORPORATED)
Wholesale & Bottling Establishment.
All our beers are bottled with the latest improved bottling
machine and are first class in every respect. Prices reason
able. Family trade a Specialty. Open evenings to 7.30.
Saturdays to 10.30.
62-70 HARTFORD AVENUE
Telephone OLNEYVILLE
Consolidated Laundry
High grade hand work and Wet Wash by the
most up-to-date methods
Hotel and Restaurant Work a Specialty
948 Westminster St., Providence, R. I.
Telephone 1334-R Union ‘
AN T S NL S RS RTG S T
J. Will Carpenter & Son
[Arthur W, Carpenter)
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS
85 PLAINFIELD STREET
Open Day and Night Telephone Connection
PROVIDENCE, R. |I.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
J. A. Latham
Civil Engineer and
Surveyor
Swarts Block, 87 Weybosset St,
Elevator Telephone
A. HERBERT ARNOLD
Funeral Director, Furnisher
and Embalmer
838 Westminister St., Providence
Telephone Night Calls Answered
Resldence, 812 Westminister St.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
lrons Block, Olneyville Square,
Providence, R. L.
ECZEMA and PILE CURE FREE
Knowing what it was to suffer, I will
glve FR‘EE‘OIT ('ll;\'l.{‘(i!"], tu:“uy ami‘cted
b eipett. Pl andSkia Disesesr 1o
stant relief. Don’t suffer longer. Write
F. B. WILLIAMS, 400 Manhattan Avenus,
New York. Enclose Siamp.
DENTIST
Room 12, Irons Block
He Wlll be In Olneyville Office every
day except Mondays
OF ALL KINDS
Films, Mounts, etc.
AT
B. A. SMITH’S
19 Olneyville Square
Graniteville
Lunch Room
New and Clean
Appetizing Food Served in
Good Style
Good Variety on Bill of Fare
Ca'l and See us
Opposite Depot
CENTREDALE, R. L.
Have Your House Heated With a
Gem Boiler
ALLEN FIRE DEPARTMENT
SUPPLY COMPANY
Colwell’s Dairy
Olneyville Square
Always Open
Automobile & Carriage
Best Work Reasonable Piicey
J. . LAVOIE
626 to 632 Broadway, Providence, R.L.
ARTEETITER ESSN Y R A
rRANK E. RANDALL
Funeral
Director and Embalmer
North Scituate, R. L
Telephone, Scituate 14.1, 2
AND
Crarston St., Rrovidence, R. L.
'elephone 206 West
U.S. AND FOREIGN
JOSEPH A. MILLER & CO.
SOLICITORS AND EXPERTS
4235 Butter Exchangs, Providence, A. |,
Experts and Arguments fuspished In
Patent Litigation. Assistance and Coum.
cil rendered as Experis in Patent Cases.
European, Canadian and Amerioan Pat«
ents for Insgutions. Designs and Trade«
marks procured promntly.

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