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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, January 11, 1922, Image 7

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1922.
Governor Small in Court in Waukegan
h 4 ■Swra - X -
The case against Gov. Len Small of Illinois, accused of conspiring to defraud the state out of $200,000 while
state treasurer, is being heard in Waukegan, and this photograph was taken utirhig the preliminary proceedings
there. Governor Small is the second man from the left.
Recalls Days of
Mexican Empire
American Widow of a Diplomat
Talks of Days of Maximilian
and Charlotte.
IS MORE THAN 80 TEARS OLD
Former Lady In Waiting Describes
Emperor as “Beautiful Character,
Sympathetic and Capable, but
Too Amiable.”
Mexico City.—A shriveled, gray
halred little woman, almost blind and
living wholly alone, sits all day in her
chair before the window of her tiny
apartment in Mexico City and tireams
of the days of the Mexican empire
when the Austrian Archduke Maximi
lian ruled the destinies of the nation
from 1804 to 1867. She is Senora Marie
Othelia Jordan de Degollado, scion of
on old Virginia family and wife >7* the
late Gen. Mariana Degollado, member
of a family famous in Mexican history.
During the three tragic years of
Maximilian’s reign she was a lady
in waiting to Empress Charlotte, the
“sad princess of Europe,” and to the
corres]K>ndent she recently recalled
some Interesting memories of court
days during the Mexican empire.
Praise for Maximilian.
Maximilian, the 111-fated Austrian
prince, who was set up as head of the
empire by Napoleon 111, In 1864, and
three years later was shot as an usur
per by order of the Mexican president,
Juarez, wnS described by Senora De
gollado as ‘‘a beautiful character, sym
pathetic and capable, but too amiable
to govern a nation of malcontents.”
Empress Charlotte, daughter of Leo
pold 1.. King of the Belgians, who is
still living tn Brussels, according to
Senora Degollado, was “an ambitious
genius, who was always striving to ad
vance her husband, and whose mind
became unbalanced when she found
the path blocked.” Senora Degollado
has never seen the empress since she
departed from Mexico City In July,
1866, to plead the cause of the empire
before the French monarch and later
to go to Rome to attempt to secure
the good offices of the pope.
So far ns she knows no direct word
has been received in Mexico from
Charlotte in more than fifteen years,
and tiiat only an incoherent note to
the wife of a former high Mexican
official.
‘‘The empress left hurriedly on her
European trip,” said Senora Degollado,
who, despite her 80-odd years, retains
n remarkably clear memory, ‘‘and was
accompanied only by her personal
maids. For many days prior to her
departure, there were evidences of her
failing reason, and wo were not sur
prised to hear of her acute affliction
several months later. I am positive
that there is absolutely no truth in
the reports that she was poisoned be
fore she left Mexico. And the em
peror I He was possessed of very kind
element of nature. He was too good.
He listened to treacherous advice and
JAFFA WILL GET HARBOR AT LAST
Jonah’s Home Town to Be
Important Sea Port.
<
Plans Under Way for Modern Road#
for Old City, Famous In B’ble
Timea—ltalian Syndicate
to Back Project.
Jaffa, Palestine. —ls Jonah the
prophet should return within tho next
few months to this little atavistic port,
whence he set sail some 2,000 years
ago on hhi tempestuous voyage, he
probably would be amazed at the
metamorphosis.
After all these centuries, modern
ism, In the form of a Twentieth nen
tury harbor, is about to make Its com
mercial encroachments upon this bask
ingl seashore, whose name waft Joppa
when Jonah knew it.
For some years, and particularly
since the British occupation, a harbor
for Palestine has been talked of, but
was shot. That day was an evil one
for Mexico.”
Fled to Guatemala.
Senora Degollado was in Mexico
City when Maximilian was shot in
Queretaro, and, although she had an op
portunity to view the body before it
was shipped to Vienna, she declined,
perferring to remember him as she
knew him. Within a few days after
the emperor’s death, she and her hus
band fled to Guatemala, where they
lived for several years until Porflrio
Diaz became president of Mexico.
Born in Norfolk, Va., Miss Marie Jor
dan went to Washington with her
father during the early days of the
Civil war, and there met Mariana De
gollado. who was attached to the Mex
ican embassy. They were married in
Washington and later came to Mexico,
Homes for
U. S. Army Men
Coblenz Provides Apartments for
Families of Yanks.
United States Army Officers’ Wives
and Children Get Modern Homes
Built by German City—To Re
lieve Crowding.
Coblenz.—Apartment houses built
by the municipality of Coblenz, aided
by the German government, were
opened recently for accommodation
exclusively of officers of the American
forces in Germany and their famil
ies.
The purpose of the houses is to re
lieve the crowded condition of the
city, which has been a problem ever
since the allied troops reached the
Rhine.
There are B*2 apartments of five
rooms each, and all modern conveni
ences in the few buildings now be
ing taken over by the American fam
ilies. Work on these apartments was
started about two years ago to allevi
ate, as the Germans put it, ‘‘an un
bearable situation,” as ‘‘do roof is
large enough to cover two families.”
Additional quarters for noncommis
sioned officers and their families are
also under construction.
Allied army officers say that the
population of Coblenz perhaps has
been harder pressed by the army requi
sition of quarters than any other oc
cupied city. All available space for
offices and billets has been under
requisition for nearly three years, but
German officials hope the new apart
ment houses will considerably improve
the present crowded condition of the
city.
In Coblenz there are about 3,000
rooms under requisition by the
American army, the general policy of
billeting being similar in all the zones
as occupied by the French. British
only now is this dream of easy ingress
and egress to and from the cradle of
Christianity about to be realized.
An Italian banking syndicate, hav
ing satisfied Itself that great commer
cial possibilities are wrapped up in
new-old Palestine, hqs offered to ad
vance the necessary capital, subject
to adequate governmental guaranties,
find the actual work is expected soon
to begin.
The plans ns drawn call for the ex
penditure of a sum not to exceed $7.-
000,060, to be retired with interest
within thirty years.
The harbor Is to be located directly
opposite the section of the old city of
Bible times, making the present cus
tom house a central point from which
the extension will be made northward
and southward. It Is to comprise
three sections, one devoted entirely
to freight and passenger ships, one to
shipbuilding and Repairing and one to
fishing.
Lack of proper harbor facilities bas
Bad Luck Comes
From Horseshoes
San Francisco. —The novel al
legation that her husband scold
ed her because she did not shoe
her horse properly is contained
In the divorce complaint filed by
Mrs. Cecelia Bernal, expert
horsewoman at several rodeos,
against Elmer Bernal, also a
horseman. While she was shoe
ing her horse at the couple’s
Livermore ranch, Mrs. Bernal
avers, she was called away from
the task and later her husband
berated her for her neglect of
the animal.

where her husband’s father. Gen.
Santos Degollado, was one of the
most prominent men of the day. A
street and plaza in Mexico City still
bear his name.
Senora Degollado believes that she
is the last survivor of the court favor
ites of the Emperor Maximilian.
and Belgians. In the majority of
I cases, allied families have been quar
tered In the same houses or apart
ments with German families, the al
lied families occupying a separate part
of the house so far as practicable, and
using the kitchen and bath in com
mon with a German occupant.
As a consequence, disputes have
arisen, and the town major, or billet
ing officer, Is often called upon to set
tle them. These disagreements almost
invariably have their origin in the
joint use of the kitchen. Because of
this difficulty, the policy has universal
ly been adopted of installing, wherever
possible, a separate kitchen for the
allied family.
Generally, when a house or apart
ment has been taken over, the Ger
mans have been permitted to take
their furniture and personal belong
ings with them. In the American area
it is stated, however, that only in ex
ceptional cases have Germans been
required to vacate their homes or
apartments entirely. One eight-room
school building In Coblenz was requi
sitioned exclusively for children of
American officers.
Gets Old Witness Fee.
Smith Centre, Kan.-—When John
Sawyer went back to his old home in
Pawnee City, Neb., a few days ago
for a visit, the clerk of the District
court there telephoned him that he
had some fees due him. and to call
and get them. Sawyer did so and was
astonished to learn it was witness
fees due him in a trial 20 years be
fore. The amount was $4.20.
Prehistoric Bone Unearthed.
Sioux Fails, S. D.—What is thought
to be a mastodon rib, which had prob
ably been burled In the same place
for from 20,000 to 30,000 years, has
been unearthed by Philip M. Hull, In
West Sioux Falls.
been one of the greatest Impediments
to commercial development of Pales
tine, and, consequently, the Inhabit
ants are looking with keen anticipa
tion upon the time when large ships
can dock easily on Palestine's shores
When the weather is stormy and the
sea rough, it is now practically impos
sible for boats to come even within
three miles of land, where even in
mild weather all ships have to be
loaded and unloaded with the aid of
small, obsolete craft. Thus It Is es
timated at least $1,060,000 a year can
be saved on the loading and unloading
item alone, to say nothing of the in
evitable effect better shipping facil
ities will have on the cost of living,
which Is now excessively high.
Commensurate with harbor improve
ment, the city of Jaffa itself Is mak
ing plans to come out of its lethargy
and reap rich rewards. Independent
commercial Interests already are lay
ing plans to develop four miles of
waterfront, intending to build store
rooms, restaurants, hotels and private
homes for the benefit of traders and
tourists.
T3fie
AMERICAN
©LEGION®
'Copy for Tnw Depurlinent Supplied by
the American Legion News Service.)
“HOBOED” TO GET POINTERS
David McCalib, Texas Veteran, Makes
“Blind Baggage" Trip to Aid
Ex-Service Men.
Jobless and penniless, hundreds of
ex-service men in the West are “riding
the rods” from
place to place in
search of employ
ment. While others
talked about doing
something for
them, David
McCalib, young
war veteran of
Dallas, Tex., made
a long trip as a
“hobo” to get
first-hand infor
mation about the
men to devise
4
means of helping them that would be
acceptable to all.
“I rode the blinds and side-door pull
mans for 800 miles over the M. K. &
T„ Sante Fe and Texas and Pacific
railroads,” McCalib reported to the
American Legion authorities of Texas
handling the unemployment problem.
“I noted three outstanding tilings in
the six-day trip. First, the real, old
time hobo of the back door variety
ha' almost disappeared. Second,
there were a large number of young
men who were too young to have
entered the army. The majority of the
men riding the rods were of this class.
Third, there was a comparatively
small number of ex-service men on the
rods. They were noticeably untrained
In the ways of hoboing.”
WAS ONLY COMIC OPERA WAR
Americans Experienced Odd Pro
visions When Joining Spanish
Legion Against Moors.
It was just a comic opera war any
how, according to 83 young Americans
who have returned to New York from
whence they sailed two months ago
to join the Spanish Foreign Legion
for service against the Moors. The
would-be Foreign Legionnaires were
represented in numbers among ex-serv-
Ice men applying to the American Le
gion employment bureau for any kind
of work.
After enlistment In New York, the
recruits, almost all of whom had
served overseas with the American
army, were sent to Ceuta, Africa.
There they were Informed for the first
time that out of their pay of
pesetas a day (about 60 cents) they
must buy their own uniform, food,
even arms and ammunition.
“It was the funniest war you ever
saw,” declared George Dimond of
Brooklyn, who explained that the hard
er you fought the moi-o It would cost
you for ammunition. If a man fought
very hard he would soon be deeply In
debt to the Spanish government. If,
on the other hand, he conserved am
munition and tried to save money, he
stood excellent chances of being
picked off by a Moor. Besides all
that, the Americans, who thought they
were to be officers, were assured that
they were welcomed only as privates.
FREE LEGAL AID FOR NEEDY
Loy J. Mollumby, Commander of Mon
tana Post, First to Sue in Be
half of Wounded.
The first man in the United States
to file suit against the government in
fl A
behalf of wound
ed soldiers was
Loy J. Mollumby,
young attorney of
GreaF Falls, Mont.
He won his case,
which was to ob
tain hospital
treatment and
compensation for
a service man who
became Insane ns
a result of his
war experience.
A second suit
against the government has been filed
by Mollumby in favor of Chris Tuss,
service man, who died of tuberculosis.
Tlds action seeks to secure payment
of war risk insurance to the young
man’s needy dependents. The govern
ment claims that the disease was con
tracted after Tuss’ discharge and af
ter his insurance had lapsed. Mol
lumby contends that he contracted tu
berculosis while in the army.
Mollumby, commander of his Ameri
can I-egion post In Great Falls, has set
up a free legal aid bureau for all sick
and wounded ex-service men.
Wanta More Land Opened.
For every government farm avail
able today there are 100 service men
standing in line, according to Secre
tary of the Interior Fall, who has in
formed the American Legion that the
government is unable in any degree
to satisfy the “back-to-the-farm” crav
ing of former soldiers and sailors with
out additional legislation. The Le
gion 18 endeavoring to have more
land opened to settlement for service
men.
You will never Get Stung at the
Busy it Bee
Dtilis Avdis, Propr.
Hamburgers Made Duley Famous
WATKINS-PR ANTE TRANSFER
Baggage, Express
All Kinds of Hauling
Telephone 5, or 117 Cody, wyo.
DONLEY & GREEVER
ATTORNEYS
Holm Block Cody, Wyo.
P(rintinjG
DWIGHT E. HOLLISTER
> Attorney-at-Law
i Cody, Wyoming
Pioneer Bldg. Phone 98
If You Want to Be Shown
THAT
An Oldtimer's Cooking is Hard to Beat
TRY
GEO. GRLPP’S PLACE
Steaks a Specialty
i
G7>e ’
BUSY POOL HALL'
DULIS AVDIS. Proprietor
Soft Drinks
Tobaccos
Cigars
If you want to have a good time
visit the Busy Pool Hall.
PAGE SEVEN
How about your Furnace,
Water pipes, Flu extension
pipes?
Need Any Repairs?
Need Any Materials?
SEE
MENZIES

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