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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, February 01, 1922, Image 3

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1922.
♦ COM CHURCHES ♦
» ♦
< -
METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School 9 :45 a. m.
Morning Sermon11:00 a. m
Sr. Epworth League. 6:45 p. m.
Krening Sermon.... 7:30 p. m.
L. C. DRYDEN, Pastor.
CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Church School10:00 a. m.
Matins and Sermou. 11 :00 a. in.
Holy Eucharist flret Sunday of
each month at .... 11:00 a. m.
A hearty welcome to all.
DRAYTON RoYAI. BI.ASKIE.
Rector.
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Services held the fourth Sun
day of each month at 10:00 a. m.
Maas and benediction.
FATHER SCHNEITERS. Pastor
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Sunday Servicell:oo a-m.
Wednesday Service.. 0:00 p.m.
Library Assembly room. The
public is cordially invited.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Snuday School10:00 a. m.
Morning Worship.ll:ooa.m.
Christian Endeavor .. 0:30 p.m.
Evening Worship7:oo p.m.
Anyone without » church home
welcome at all our ' .vices.
A. M. SHEPPL.tD. Pastor.
IWM. L. SIMPSON
PRACTICES IN ALL COURTS
Special Attention to Land
and Private Matters
| CODY. WYOMING
M. CHAMBERLIN
DENTIST
HOTEL CHAMBERLIN '
Cody, Wyoming )
SBUY IT OF
DAVE JONES
AND SAVE MONEY
Dave Shelley
Saddles
4 COW-BOY BOOTS
Hyer, Justin and T« fatal
on Hand
Chaps. Bits and Spurs
Tourists Outfits ' 1
I CHAS J. RHOADS, D.O. S.
Located In Shoshone National
Bank Building
Cody, Wyoming.
DENTISTRY
: Got Something |
You ♦
::Want to Sell?
■ • Most people have a piece
I of furniture, a farm imple- !
; ; tnent, or something else ;
< > which they have discard-
' ed and which they no lon- I
] ; ger want }
< ■ These things are put in
< ! the attic, or stored away
; ; in the barn, or left lying ;
> • about, getting of less and <
i ' less value each year.
i > i
. i . -J
.i - <
• > <
WHY NOT i
SELL THEM?:
:: Somebody wants those :
; ; very things which have ;
; 1 become of no use to you. •
Why not try to find that !
somebody by putting a ;
want advertisement in ■
THIS NEWSPAPER? i
SOCIALIST BANK
A RANK FAILURE
NONPARTISAN LEAGUE FAILED
UTTERLY TO AID NORTH
DAKOTA FARMERS.
Auditors and certified accountants
who, for the past three months have
been working on the books of the vari
ous Nonpartisan league “experiment*
in socialism” in North Dakota, are
finding facts and figures which more
than sustain every charge made
against the league. It would appear
from figures so far secured that not
only was the management of these "so
cialist experiment*" extravagant and
reckless, but that money was used
with marked lllierality to father league
propaganda in other states.
When tiie Nonpartisan league cap
lured North Dakota the one scheme
that was to aid and benefit the farm
ers of that state was the establishment
of the Bank of North Dakota in which
all public money must be deposited,
this money to be loaned the farmers at
a low rate of Interest and on long time
mortgages. The bunk, it will be re
called, was to have a capital of $2,-
000,000, this to come from the sale of
$2,000,000 of bonds voted for that pur
pose. The bank opened, but ns the
bonds could not Is* sold. had no capi
tal: but that was easily arranged. The
manager of the hank drew checks on
the Bank of North Dakota for $2,000,-
000, which cheeks he handed the board
holding the bonds, and the board ac
cepted the checks and delivered the
bonds. Then the hoard deposited the
checks in the Bank of North Dakota,
the account not to be drawn on until
other money came in. so that the bank
then was well under way with a capi
tal of S2,<MM),OOO in bonds of the state,
and $2,000,000 on deposit. Very clever
piece of financing!
Just a “Milking Station.”
The first report from the Bank of
North Dakota since the socialists in
charge were thrown out of office has
been made as of Dec. 31, and as yet
the auditors have not hail time to dig
deeply into a number of rather pecu
liar matters. Enough has been found,
however, to sustain the contention that
the bank, as a matter of fad, is Insolv
ent and that, instead of being some
thing of benefit to the farmers of
North Dakota, did not help the farm
ers, being simply a “milking station,”
securing cash from taxpayers and us
ing this cash largely f<jr propaganda
work in other states.
The report of Dec. 31 shows that
there is deposited in defunct Nonpar
tisan league banks the sum of $559.-
184 and that these same defunct Insti
tutions were loaned $1,031,801, or a to
thl of $1,590,985, every dollar of which
wan deposited in the Bank of North
Imkotn for specific purposes. To “so
cialist experiments.’* such as the mill
and elevator, the home building associ
ation, and others, were loaned $1,639,-
031, not a dollar of which was author
ized by law. and ail of which was
money on deposit for specific purfMises.
In other words, the sum of $3,230,016
was practically squandered its but a
smalt |>ereentage of It can be salvaged
from the <lefuncl Institutions.
Aided Leaguers Only.
The Bank of North Dakota, it will
he recalled, was to be the “friend of
the fanner, was to loan him such mon
ey as he needed on real estate for a
long period and at n low rate of in
terest.” Organizers In Wyoming are
now telling tin* farmers of this state,
ns an inducement to get their $lB mem
bership fee, that there will be a Bank
of Wyoming to “help the farmers.”
During the entire period of existence
of the Bank of North Dakota its total
loans to “farmers" was but $3,156,071,
or less than was squandered on the
“experiments” and given to defunct
banks. This would not have been so
bad, but the deserving farmer who had
security got little consideration when
it came to making loans, the available
money going principally to “good leag
uers,” regardless of security, and upon
this character of loan the Interest re
mains unpaid nt this time. And fore
closures will result with a big loss to
the state —that is to the taxpayers.
Has Little Cash Reserve.
'l'lilk “soclnllal experiment,” never
conducted along business lines, but
wholly ns a side Issue to secure easy
money for extensive propaganda pur
poses, did not fill any real function, and
when II Is finally wound up and taken
to the cemetery of similar institutions,
It will be deposited In nn unmarked
grave. The cost to the taxpayers of
Norili Dakota will be enormous. No
good came from Its operation at any
time, while the harm done will be re
flected for many years. This bank,
with liabilities on Dec. 31 outside of
the capital stock of $2,tMM>.<MMi of state
bonds, of $7,450,237, most of which lia
bilities consist of money due deposit
ors, has to pay the same but $98,361
In cash, not as much real cash ns
would be kept on hand by the average
Wyoming bank having deposits be
tween $400,000 and SSOO,(MM).
The same people who grabbed the
state of North Dakota and "milked” It
clean are now trying to grub Wyoming.
The oil royalties of the state look good
to them. They are not farmers, have
no special interest In the welfare of
the farmers, but are trying to use the
farmers to aid them in getting close to
the treasury of a state where oil roy
alties would give them access to more
money than the Bank of North Dakota
could ever yield.
It is easy for any one to get Ihe
truth of the Nonpartisan Ix»tigtie "ex
perience” In North Dakota, If they
want the truth.
Brief News Notes
From All Parts of
Wyoming
(WMtera Newspaper Lb ion Neat Sbttlcb. I
Eighty-five divorce cases appeared
on the District Court docket in Sheri
dan for 1921, constituting over a third
of all cases docketed.
Dr. D. S. Hamilton, former mayor of
Greybull and a practicing physician for
ten years. Is dead. He passed away
at a Billings hospital following an op
eration for appendicitis. Dr. Hamilton
was born in Boston, and was 52 years
old.
Sheridan high school's first winter
tournament of tobbogan racing and
Jumping and ski racing attracted more
than 300 spectators to the tourney. So
successful was the first attempt that
the high school authorities are plan
ning to have a series of outdoor
matches this winter.
I*. F. Hodgson of Thermopolis suf
fered temporary blindness, hut es
caped permanent injuries when a shot
gun with which lie was hunting was
blown to pieces by a shell in firing.
The gun Jiad been fired several times
the same day and the owner is at a
loss to explain his narrow escape.
The faculty of the division of music
of the University of Wyoming will
have leave on Feb. 15 for a concert
tour of the central and northern parts
of the state. The itinerary includes
Cheyenne, Casper, Wheatland, Sheri
dan. Powell niio Buffalo, and in each
t< nr concert will be given under the
auspices of the public scjiools.
The plan of drawing women on the
jury for the coming term of court in
Hot Springs county, as reported, had
to lie abandoned because a law stood
in the way. The officers were fig
uring on preparing the lists to include
the names of women when Judge Metz
called their attention to the statute
which .says "all male citizens,” etc.
Jack Strong, 25 years old, a rancher,
and Preston Thomas, 21 years old,
were killed near Hudson. Wyo., when
the automobile in which they were
riding left the road and overturned.
William T. Broderick of lender, who
was driving the machine, was badly In
jured, but is expected to recover. The
cause of the accident is unknown.
Mrs. Burke Sinclair, wife of Colonel
Sinclair, commander of Wyoming men
In the World War, was re-elected pres
ident of tlie Casper Y. W. C. A. at the
annual meeting of the board of direc
tors. Mrs. B. B. Brooks was made vice
president; Mrs. William H? Holland,
second vice president; Miss Mae Win
ter, secretary, and Miss Helen Wallace,
treasurer.
Robert S. Stephens, 32 years old,
owner of a vulcanizing and automobile
repair shop, lost several fingers and
incurred other injuries in an explosion
of a retread mould at Casper. Two
men standing nearby were not in
jured. Stephens was struck by flying
bits from the machine. Windows in
the shop and adjoining stores were
broken by the force of the blast.
Joseph Dagdale is completely para
lyzed at Rock Springs as the result of
a night of exposure during December,
when he was marooned In the Red
Desert through failure of his automo
bile. He was found unconscious by a
rescuing party the following day arid
was believed to tie well on the way to
recovery when, a few’ days ago, com
plete paralysis developed.
The building committee of the Cas
per City Council went Into conference
recently with engineers to devise ways
and means of reinforcing the city hall
built four years ago at a cost of $125,-
000. from destruction threatened by
sinking. Unless immediate action is
taken, it is stated, the city may he
forced to tear it down, as earth under
the foundation is giving away.
The movies helped to gain a bride for
George Buffum, 21, formerly of Wor
land but now residing in Denver.
Young Buffum, who is the son of Prof.
B. (’. Buffum—“Big Horn Basin Bur
bank"—told his parents that he was
going to a movie theater. Instead he
(doped to Littleton, Colo., with Miss
May V. Masters, of Denver, and now
the professor has a new daughter.
The Lander Masonic lodge initiated
and installed fifteen officers for the
De Molay, recently organized. These
officers will initiate several more boys
as officers later on. The l>e Molay is
a chapter of a lodge which is an inter
national organization and since it was
organized two years ago has enrolled
a membership of 75.000 boys. It is for
boys between the ages of 16 and 21.
(’as|»er Ims the largest night school
in vocational training study In the
state, according to the latest report
made. J. It. ('oxen, state director of
vocational education, in a letter sent
to men in charge of schools in the
state, reported that Rock Springs was
leading In number of classes and at
tendance. itock Springs has 191 stu
dents and eleven classes, nnd Casper,
not including Salt <’reek, Ims twelve
classes anil 225 students.
The stockyards were finished at Yo
der in record-breaking time by Fore
man Vosse nnd ills men. They com
pleted a three weeks' job in ten days.
Vosse and his party of carpenters and
helpers have gone to Huntley. Nebr.,
where they will build tl»<? depot for the
Union Pacific.
Fifty-two nlions, eager to become
citizens of the United States, appeared
before Judge T. Blake Kennedy,
United States district Judge of the
Wyoming district, sitting temporarily
In Denver, at the opening of a two-day
hearing of their naturalization cases.
©TtiE ©.
AfOlffiN
LLGION
'Copy for Thi» Department Supplied by
the American Legion New* Service, >
IN ARMY AT THE AGE OF 14
Stephen S. Tillman of Washington
Now Sergeant-at-Arms of George
Washington Post.
Stephen 8. Tillman. Washington. D.
C., served as a private in the army dur-
mg the World
war at the mature
age of fourteen
year*. He was
regularly enlisted
and sworn in and
didn’t have to lie
about his age.
Just before he
went to the re
cruiting office he
cut the numerals
; “18” out of a cal
' endar and pasted
‘ them in the heels
; -T ?'
of his shoes. When the recruiting of
ficer asked him how old he was. Till
man replied: “I’jn over eighteen.”
They swore him in.
Being a trifle smaller than a regula
tion army rifle., he was detailed as a
bugler. He went to the Mexican bor
der with his company, “B” of the Third
D. infantry. Coming back from the
border as the United States entered
the World war. he did guard duty
along Conduct road, Washington,
where several hundred attractive
young women were taking an intensive
training course. But he was only six
teen years old then.
Now he is sergeant-at-arms of
George Washington Post No. 1 of the
American Legion. Washington, the
first Legion post organized. His fa
ther is a retired cavalry officer.
THE TRAYLOR FAMILY HELPED
Father, Mother, Four Sons and Two
Daughters in Uniform During
the World War.
When the old question of ‘‘who won
the war?” conies up, the Traylor fam
ily of Trenton.
■****•-• ' Wl
' ' I
\jir
Mo., may step
forward and ad
mit that they
helped. The com
manding officer of
the family that
was 100 per cent
in active service
was the father.
W. S. Traylor,
rank —private.
Mr. Traylor,
his wife, four
sons and two
daughters were all in uniform. When
war was declared, Mr. Traylor closed
up his general store, donned the uni
form of a buck private in the quarter
master corps and did his bit well, de
spite his fifty-three years. Mother and
the sisters were on active duty with
the Red Cross.
Os the four sons, Charles was with
the Eighty-ninth division and was
wounded. Frank was an aviator. Or
ville served with the adjutant gen
eral’s department and Roy was with
the Thirty-first railway engineers.
JUMPING BEANS FOR GIRLS
Sick and Wounded Veterans in New
Mexico Hospitals Are Hungry
for Cheer Letters.
Trained to leap through hoops and
stand unhitched, thousands of genuine
Mexican Jumping beans are awaiting
girls of the United States who will
write a little letter of cheer to a dis
abled soldier. The exchange of letters
for Jumping beans is being made
through Herman G. Baca, Santa Fe,
N. M.. adjutant of the American Le
gion of the state.
Five thousand sick and wounded
veterans of the World war. recuperat
ing in hospitals in New Mexico, have
trained the beans. The young men
are terribly lonesome, Mr. Baca writes,
and they will send a bean to every
girl who will write a letter to them.
The Jumping beans are dark brown,
somewhat larger than the ordinary
bean. The animation of the vegetable
Is caused by a tiny worm that crawls
into the bean and consumes the edible
portion. After the worm Is dead, the
bean keeps on Jumping.
Presidents as Military Men.
More than half of the presidents of
the United States have held some mil
itary rank, according to The American
Legion Weekly. Os the whole line of
twenty-eight presidents sixteen were
military men. and of the succession
following the Civil war Grunt. Hayes,
Garfield. Arthur and Harrison were
generals; Roosevelt was a colonel and
McKinley was a major.
Unto the End.
“How’s this?” asked the lawyer.
“You’ve named six bankers in your
will to be pall-bearers. Os course. It’s
all right, but, wouldn’t you rather
choose some friends with whom you
are on better terms?”
“No, judge, that’s all right. Those
fellows have carried me for so long
(hey might as well finish the job.”—
American Legion Weekly.
The POSTOFFICE STORE •
Cody’s Original
Souvenir Store ;
The P. O. Store CODY, W |
——————————————a
1
CODY INSURANCE CO. AGTS. *
I
FIRE AND AUTOMOBILE |
INSURANCE ;
Ewart &. McGee First Nat’l Bank |
- -
<4? K y° u Deed
some come
S/lAr X:
SI,OOO Reward
will be paid for information lead
ng to the arrest and conviction
>f any person or persons killing
or stealing stock belonging to
W. R. COE
Cody, Wyoming
We want you to remember that besides print
ing this paper we do job work of all kinds.
HOOVER
Best Vacuum Cleaner
on MarKet
SHOSHONE ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER CO.
Cody, Wyoming
GEORGE T. BECK PraridnU
\ Cowboys! Ranchers! |
Now is the Time to Shoe <
j Your Horses! g
; You Can’t Beat |
\ Scotty The Blacksmith |
| FOWLER’S ~~
| NEW & SECOND HAND .STORE
| Highest Cash Price Paid
| for Hides, Pelts and Furs
At the Old Place on Sheridan Avenue, Cody, Wyoming
Successor to
( Lambert’s 2nd Hand Store)
ni] i iiiiiAri , ?Tnw:trrm^rTrnnnmi i^ii nnnii. , i|»nnznr^'>*j^ , i tgnr—
rv.v.v.v. —— _ vawaw,
| Our Hobby
S 5 Is Good n :• >5
4 4 4 • . • Asktosee ■. < <
< 4 Printing samplesof 4 > >
■IS 5 our busi- J >
J ■; nesscards, 4 5"•
!■ 5 i ■ ——— visiting 4 4
■I 4 ;• - —w cards, 4 4 4
■ ; J 4 wedding <
!• S 4 and other invitations, pam- \ 45.
• J J % phlets, folders, letter heads, I" £4
Ij 4 4 statements, shipping tags, 4 4 4
!■ 5 5 envelopes, etc., constantly 5 4
■ J 4 4 earned in stock for your I- J ?
I; 4 4 accommodation. ■» 4 4
4 5 5 Get our figures on that 4 5 5
■ J 4 4 printing you have been ;• ? ?
!■ i 4 thinking of. 5 4 4
554 4 4
5 5 New Type, Latest 5 >
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;! WV.-.'.WA —————rwv——■ “z.-.wz.ssi :■
t.WAWAW.WA'.WAWAW.V.-.W.V.'.'.WSV.’.W.-.V,
PAGE THREE
I IF YOU WANT i
! CLASSY PRINTING
! WITH DISTINCTIVE PERSON- |
ALITY, PLACE YOUR OR- I
j DER WITH
• The Park County Enterprise I
I The Big Cash Store ‘
i
J. M. SCHWOOB, Manager |
General Merchandise J
I -J
IHAID’S CASH STORE J
Groceries & Dry Goods [
“QUALITY FIRST” 5
| Cody, Wyoming |
—————————— v
ERNEST J. GOPPERT j
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
. oomt 3 and 4. Walia Building |
Phone 131
CODY. WYOMING
«
, » —— - - —a
SOMETHING TO SELL? ADVER
TISE IT IN THESE COLUMNS.

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