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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, February 22, 1922, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR
Che Cody enterprise
PUBLIHSED EVERY WEDNESDAY
CAROLINE LOCKHART &■ C. M. CONGEK
OWNERS AND PUBLISHERS
Telephone, No. 9.
Entered as second-class matter Feb
ruary 14, 1910, at the post-office at
Cody, Wyoming, under the Act of
March 8, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year 12.00
Bix Months 100
Single Copy 05
(Foreign Subscription $2.50)
Advertising Rates promptly furnished
upon request.
Member of
The Wyoming Press Association
The Big Horn Basin Press Club
The National Editorial Association
Member of American Press Asso
ciation of Advertisers, 225 W, 39th
St., New York City, N. Y.
MONDELL’S CANDIDACY
FOR THE U. S. SENATE
Occasionally one hears the remark
from those unacquainted with the true
situation, that Mondell should return
to the House of Representatives. Too
often perhaps the wish is the father
to the thought; but in other instanc
es, those possessed of this belief are
honest in their opinion. To go to the
United States Senate has been almost
the life-long, as well as the laudible
ambition of Frank W. Mondell. So
long ago as the senatorial fight of
1893 when the Republicans lacked
one of a majority in the legislature,
and the Democrats were unable to
muster all of their strength to the
support of any one candidate, the Re
publican strength was cast for Mon
dell, with the single exception ofy his
vote during many ballots. It will be
recalled that there was no election by
the legislature and that Wyoming, for
a two year period, had only one Unit
ed States Senator. This experience
turned the attention of the people to
Frank Mondell as Congressional Tim
ber. In 1894, at the Casper conven
tion, although first urged for the po
sition of Governor, Mondell was nom
inated for Representative in Congress.
In 1910, or shortly thereafter, close
friends of Clarence D. Clark stated
that he would not run again, and the
White Lunch
Open Again and
Doing Business
BETTER THAN EVER!
Try a Cup of Our Coffee
With Pure Cream
—HOME MADE PIES—
Mike Miller, prop.
UJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiimm
| Banner Store |
| Groceries, |
Fresh Fruit
= Prompt Delivery. Telephone 27 =
| C.J. Silins, Manager. |
Miiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiif
I IF YOU WANT A NEAL MEAL TRY THE I
I I HART case. I I
GENUINE HOME COOKING
CLEAN LINEN
EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE
H - AND PIES LIKE MOTHER USED TO MAKE
—ONLY BETTER
friends of Mondell suggested that if j
Senator Clark ultimated decided upon '
this plan, Mondell would be the candi- i
date. Senator Clark, however, decid-1
ed to make the race in 1916, and the
result is history.
In 1917 Senator Warren reached
the conclusion that he would like to
retire to private life, and Mondell an
nounced that he would be a candidate
to succeed him. Mr. John Hay also
entered the race. The United States |
got into the war and the demand up
on Senator Warren to remain in the
Senate was so strong that he changed ,
his plans and was re-elected in 1918. I
All down through the years it has ;
been the general opinion among Re- ■
publicans of Wyoming that Mondell
should be the first Republican nomi
nated when proper opportunity pre
sented Itself. By the fiasco of 1916,
a place in the Senate was lost to the
Republicans of Wyoming. That place
is to be filled by election this year.
It is the first time that the way has
been cleared for Mr. Mondell’s candi
dacy. At least a year ago he began
letters from prominent Re
publicans over the State, urging him
to make the race. During the spring
of 1921 the Sheridan Post, the most
prominent Republican daily of Nor
thern Wyoming, published a strong
editorial in advocacy of his nomina
tion. With a single exception, Wyo
ming’s Republican press joined in
this demand, and in the month of Au
gust Mr. Mondell issued a statement
which summed up the situation in an
admirable manner, therein announc
ing to the people of Wyoming that he
would be a candidate at the general
election in 1922.
The entire situation, therefore, was
fully canvassed by leading Republi
cans and the Republican press before
Mr. Mondell consented to enter the
race. Having so decided and made
his announcement to the people, there
was and is but one course to pursue
—to stand for the United States Sen
ate. He has never forf a moment
swerved from this decision and state
ments to the effect that he should re
main in the House are. coming mainly
from those who are in opposition to
the election of a Republican senator.
This year above all others, when
Republican principles and the Repub
lican administration are on trial, the
Republicans of Wyoming should be
steadfast and should dp their utter
most to regain the seat lost to them.
All over the nation the Democrats are
passing the word that they are going
to carry Congress this year and that
they will then be in a position to
block the plans and the policies of
President Harding.
There is another insiduous argu
-1 ment being used by our Democratic
friends —that Mr. Mondell would have
no influence in the senate. That is
not at all true. In the senate he
would have 1 vote to 96. In the House
Ihe has 1 in 435. He would not only
, have more than four times the voting
strength, but he would carry with
him to the senate all of the personal
acquaintance and intimate knowledge
of legislation attained by ewenty-flve
years of service. His intimate know
ledge of all of the various activities
of the departments and bureaus would
!go with him. At the same time, he
and Senator Warren would be able to
give to our member of the House of
Representative the value of their long
Congressional experience and person
al friendships. •
Those Democrats who are persist
ent in their argument that Mr. Mon
dell should go to the House have ex
ceedingly short memories. They do
not refer to the fact that Mr. Ken
drick, who was elected to the position
of Governor in 1914, became a candi
i date in 1916 for the United States
: Senate, against a constitutional pro-
I vision, and after election deserted his
post, turning over his office to a man
poorly fitted for the position and with
out the confidence of the people. Mr.
Kendrick, in justice to the people of
Wyoming, should have remained in
the position of governor.
The Republicans and the entire peo
ple of Wyoming have a vast deal to
gain by sending Mondell to the sen
ate, and this is their purpose this
year.
Powell Unit Holders
Soured On. Nelson
S. A. Nelson is back from Washing
ton for the third time, and, as usual,
when we asked for bread he brought
us a stone. Whether he meant for us
to use the stene as a project grave
marker, or to he tied to our necks the
better to sink us, remains to be seen.
But this one thing is certain. Though
he didn’t sec “Old Man Warren,’’ Ken
drick, nor Secretary Fall, he did find
time to stop off a day at Cheyenne to
feel the political pulse.
We haven’t a good memory but It
does seem true that the horse on
which Nelson rode to Washington was
groomed and caparisoned at Billings
by a conference bent on junket enter
prises at a cent and a half an acre;
also that the said conference charged
the said Nelson with three important
duties to perform which he seems to
have forgotten on the way. Then,
’ike the hunter who did not want to
return empty handed, brough back,
not a dead rabbit picked up by the
I wayside, but two full grown, well
pursed Irrigation district twins, one
for Powell and one for Deaver, not
mentioned in the plans and specifica
tions.
Some of us think that these were
slipped into his grip when he left
Powell. If that be true he certainly
took good care of them while away.
The line of communication between
Powell and Washington was closed
while Mr. Nelson was there, but we
did happen to be admitted to the in
ner circle, by invitation Monday night
to attend a meeting of the faithful at
the Badger Club room, to hear Nel
son’s report. There the "red flag was
waved In the faces of the bulls’’ who
happened all to be cows except two.
One of the two told them they could
get nowhere with the red flag, and if
any plan for relief was to succeed,
that plan must have the undivided
support of the unit holders. To this
Nelson consented, and expressed sen
timents of laying the district matter
aside until after we got the govern
ment’s plan of fconcesston, and “use
the irrigation district as stock in
trade to drive a beter bargain.” As
, ter the meeting we conferred with
Mr. Caldwell in the presence of Mr.
Scott and Mr. Carpenter—all mem
bers he water users board —and
Mr ; and Mr. Caldwell did say
to us uiac "for the sake of harmony
the irrigatipn district proposition of
Nelson’s report would not be present
ed to the meeting of water users Sa
turday afternoon —that we wanted the
five year concession and the district
matter could rest in the meantime
and be taken up later.”
Everyone present understood that
to be the arrangement. This will ex
plain to those we informed by phone,
and otherwise, why they were told
that the irrigation district matter
would not come up at the Saturday
meeting. It was due to a mistaken
i faith in men we thought had a con
' science. For, didn’t you see that
these men were determined to make
sure of the district at the expense of
harmony, even if it did jeopardize the
plan for relief? It looked as if they
were willing to trade the whole pro
ject for a concession which, after all,
will probably help the bankers more
than the farmers.
And what else did they do? We
never believed from the beginning
that they would let the unit holders
vote by ballot on the irrigation dis
trict matter. And they never will.
You must not expect to. Just turn
over everything you have to them.
The meeting held Saturday deprived
you of any right to vote when it ap
proved Nelson’s propositions which
already in the hands of Director Da
vis for action.
You will recall, too, that Nelson
vouchsafes an irrigation district for
the Deaver people, probably on the
theory that what is good for the gan
der is also good for the goose. We
thought he was merely a delegate
chosen to carry out the expressed
The Mint Case
We Use the Celebrated
CORONA BLEND COFFEE
Made in Electric Percolator
TABLES FOR LADIES
Sort Drinks, Smokes, and
Good Candies In
Connection
Chop Suey, Ch'nese Noodles
Home Made Chile
Everything Good to Eat
but it turns out that he wall the am
bassador plenipotentiary extraordi
nary of nfll of northern Wyoming.
But by what right we voted Satur
day to promise the interior’ depart
ment a district for Deaver is only
for the gods to know.
Signed: Powell Unit Holders
Who Want a Square Deal.
{ALTER SOCIETY ORGANIZED
At the request of the Rector, the
Rev. Royal Blaskie, an Alter Society
has been organized in dhrist Parish.
These ladies will have charge of
the furnishings and decorations .of
the church; also will look after the
sacristy and sanctuary of Christ
church. It is the plan of the Society
to meet regularly during Lent for
work and instructions.
The following officers were elected
to serve until January 1923:
Directoress: Mrs. D. R. Blaske.
Sub-Directoress, Mrs. Louis Howe.
Sec’y-Treas: Mrs. Russell Kimball.
Nine cheese factories are in opera
tion in the southern part of Wyoming.
A rancher in Nebraska made his
flock of chickens pay for his new
home and 11 acres of ground.
More radium is mined in the United
State than in any other place in the
world.
A man found wiping his auto with
an American flag was recently jump
ed on by several members of the
American Legion Post in Tampa. He
was pronounced "simply ignorant”
and given instruction in how to treat
the colors. Hearing of the incident,
the man’s employer presented the Le
gion Post with a large flag.
With added new equipment and an
outlook for more favorable weather
conditions we will be able to give the
public better bus service to and from
the depot Beginning March Ist our
price will be 25tf each way. Phone
call 204. Cody Transfer Co. It
The Irma Bar-Room will be opened
March Ist under the management of
H. H. Patchell; Billiards and Soft
Drinks. 29-4 t
IClassifiedAdsl
-
TOR SALE—I4OO lb. work horse.
Reasonable terms. See June Little.
WAN.TED: —-Position as cook on
ranch or any project work. Inquire'
at Enterprise or call at Raeder’s 29
BOARD—Good home cooking. Rates
reasonable. Phone 93-J. 50-14tf.
All kinds of hauling—wood for sale
in log or sawed —delivered. Phone
121-W. James Armstrong. 236tp
FOR SALE OR LEASE—IOBO acres
agricultural and grazing land, fenced
and cross-fenced. G. P. Gentner. 27tf
WANTED —Second hand steel cable
% to 1 Inch thickness. L H. Larom,
Valley Ranch.
FOR RENT—WeII furnished apart
ment of six rooms at a reasonable
figure. Inquire at Enterprise office.
FOR SALE—Fresh Jersey Cow, 6
years old. J. C. McEachro. Phone
75-Ji 28-29
notTce for publ.cation
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Lander, Wyoming,
February 10, 1922.
NOTICE Ib hereby given that
ALFRED HOAGLAND,
of Cody, Wyoming, who, on Septem
ber 23, 1918. made Homestead Entry,
No. 010578, for S%NE% Section
7; NHNEI4 Section 18, Township 50
North, Range 101 West, 6th Principal
Meridian, has tiled notice of Intention
to make Three Year Proof, to estab
lish claim to the land above described,
before Carl M. Cox, U. S. Commission
er, at Cody. Wyoming, on the 25th
day of March, 1922.
Claimant names as witnesses.
Joe Freeborg, William Plumb, Bert
Bates, Harmon Schultz, all of Cody,
Wyoming.
IRVING W. WRIGHT, Register.
First publication February 15
Last publication March 15.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Lander, Wyoming,
February 2nd, 1922.
NOTICE is hereby given that
ROY J. BLOOD,
of Cody, Wyoming, who, on May 12th,
1920, made Additional Homestead En
try, No. 07962 for SIJNWIi, W%SW%
Sec. 23; and on July 16, 1920, made
Additional Entry No. 08640 for
E%SEW, SE>4NE’4 Sec. 22; NH
NWU, WHNE%4 Sec. 23; NW&NE&
Section 26, Township 50 N., Range
105 W., Sth Principal Meridian, has
filed notice of intention to make Three
Year Proof, to establish claim to the
land above resceibed, before George
S. Russell, Clerk of the District Court,
at Cody, Wyoming, on the 25th day
of March. 1922.
Claimant names ac witnesses:
Simon Snyder, Albert J. Hartung, all
of Ishawooa, Wyoming; Walter a Kep
ford, Charles Pierce, all of Cody, Wy
oming.
IRVING W. WRIGHT, Register.
First publication February 8
Last publication March 8
EPISCOPAL GUILD WILL
J HOLD BAKE SALES
The Episcopal Guild will hold its
usual Lenten Bake Sales at two dif
ferent stores in town. There will be
six bake sales.
The first one will be held at the
Western Drug Store, starting on Sa
turday, March 4th.
The second sale will be at the Gol
den Rule Store, starting March 11th.
Other stores will be named later.
The third bake sale will be March
18th, also a sale_ of handkerchiefs.
The fifth bake sals, also sale of
aprons, April Ist. The sixth bake
sale, also sale of lingeries, April Bth.
Plan to Set Aside a Fixed Percentage of Your Income in a
SAVINGS ACCOUNT
In tZfie
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND WATCH IT GROW
V Kr!r:7nnnriTmTrnTTnTnTmr^n^g:nnn.' , rfnnTTHpTTrffiyrmumnr!T
Yellowstone Garage
CHAS. STUMP, Proprietor
Announces a Big Reduction in
VESTA BATTERIES
See the Ford Water Circulating
Pump Demonstration
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHHlllllllllll
BILLIARDS!
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIII
Carom Billiards -j- Pocket Billiards
Soft Brinks, Lunch, Cigars
PATCH ELL’S
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii
I S. C. Parks, Jr., President R. W. Allen, Cashier
SHOSHONE NATIONAL BANK
CODY, WYOMING
DIRECTOR*
Geo. Merrill, S. Conant Parks, S. W. Aldrich
D. J. Jones, M. W. Nuckols, S. C. Parks, Jr., R. W. Allen
MONEY IS SCARCE! SAVE MONEY!!
COAL » SB.OO
correci weighi; one Price io An
none >BB Native coal co.
OHO I. NELSON, Manager
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, |I92Z-
The United States is flrat among
the wheat producing nations, wlttk
France second and Canada third.
The manufacture and sale of mo
tor vehicles in the United States in
1921 aggregated 81,7000,000,000.
CASH! CASH! CABHI
PAID FOR HIDES, PELTS, ,
■nd FURS. Get My Prices on
FURS.
J. P. WEBER
Phone 142 CODY, WYO.

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