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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, March 29, 1922, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR
Che Cody enterprise
Entered as second-class matter Feb
ruary 14, 1910, at the post-office at
Cody, Wyoming, under the Act of
March 8, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year $2.00
Six Months 1.00
Single Copy 05
(Foreign Subscription $2.50)
Advertising Rates promptly furnished
upon request.
Member of
The Wyoming Press Association
The Big Hom Basin Press Club
The National Editorial Association
Member of American Press Asso
ciation of Advertisers, 225 W, 39th
St., New York City, N. Y.
WOULD KNOW WHERE
TO LOOK FOR HIM
An Indian went into the office of
the editor of a Western paper to get
a year’s subscription.
After paying for the paper he asked
for a receipt.
“You don’t need a receipt,” suggest
ed the editor, “the date on your copy
will tell when you paid.”
“But,” said the Indian, “some day I
die, and when I go up to the gate,
Saint Peter, he say, ‘You pay your
debts?’
“I say ‘Yes, and he say, ‘You pay
for your paper?’ and I say ‘Yes.’
“ ‘You get a receipt?’ And I say i
•I don’t got any for that one.’
“Then I got to run all over Hell to
find you to get a receipt."
GETS “01,0 MAID”;
WHIPS THE FAMILY
Louis Friedmav, Mrs. Friedman,
and two sons started to play “Old
Maid” around the dining room table
in their flat in New York City one day
last week.
Mr. Friedman laughed merrily when
his wife drew the Old Maid twice in
succession. Finally father drew the
Old Maid and it made him so mad
when the joke was on him that he
etarted to “clean up” the family.
Mrs. Friedman and the two sons
showed fight and this brought the
rest of the cliff dwellers to the scene.
The excitement spread until “Pa”
Friedman was giving battle to the
entire block.
The result was that they all went
to the police court, with a procession
of witnesses half a block Jong. Be
sides getting the “Old Maid,” Father
got a stiff fine.
REVOLT GRIPS
HIM STATES
REBEL FORCES SURROUND MOR
ELIA, CAPITAL OF MICHOA
CAN; SEVERAL KILLED
FEDERAL FORCES ON MOVE
Governor’s Guards Clash With Rebel
Detachment Forcing Latter to
Retreat; Federal Troops Sup
porting State Government
Mexico City.—Disturbances accom
panied by some bloodshed, which have
taken place in the states of Michoa
can and Jalisco during the last few
weeks are causing the central govern
ment here to assume an energetic at
titude In policing these districts, al
though the activities do not appear to
have been directed against President
Obregon.
Morelia, capital of Michoacan, has
been in a state of panic for several
days due to threats of rebels under
Col. Francisco Cardenas to take the
city. Reports received here indicate
that the revolutionists are surround
ing Morelia and possibly may occupy
It.
Guards maintained by Francisco J.
Mnrgla, governor of Michoacan, clash
ed with a rebel detachment on the
outskirts of Morelia last night. Sever
al men were killed. The rebels re
treated. Murgia Is said to have aban- ;
doned the government palace during
the fighting and to have taken refuge |.
In the tower of the cathederai.
Press dispatches from Morelia are ■
obscure as to the real situation there, ■
but It appears that various rebel forces :
are united under the command of Car- :
denas and they are threatening the :
state authorities. 'The state govern- :
ment is being supported by federal :
troops.
The state of Jalisco has been added :
to the list of states w’here the gover- •
nor Is in conflict with an agresslve'■
opposition. Gov. Basilio Vadlllo Is :
at outs with his legislature, which :
charges him with being responsible ;
for recent demonstrations In which ;
sever** 1 persons were killed and many '
Injured.
The state of Pueblo, which was the j
acene several weeks ago of armed re- <
•rfstance against tho state government ;
of Jose Marla Sanchez, apparently ;
has returned to normal after the oust- •
Jog of Sanchez and the substitution of •
What They’re Doing In The World Outside
A story comes from Switzerland
that an American who advertised for
a secretary and offered a moderate
salary and comfortable home received
applications from three princesses,
nine baronesses, thirty countesses,
and an almost endless number of the
wives and daughters of former high
officials.
• • • •
Congress knows who wants the
bonus, but can’t find out who wants
to pay it.
• • * • .
The “Four power treaty” has been
ratified by the senate by a majority
of four.
• • • •
It might solve some of the troubles
of the movinig-picture world if the
stars were paid salaries more nearly
commensurate with what they really
earn.
• • • •
Great Britain has decided to take
no chances on the decree of the arms
conference which bans the use of poi
son gas in war. Even if it should be
come international law in time Eng
land perceives the possibility, if not
the probability, of its violation in
time of war and intends to be prepar
i ed for contingencies.
• • * •
Nearly 600 banks in the United
States suspended payment, and there
were 16,000 commercial bankruptcies.
Greece was in "the abyss of insolven
cy” and Italy was on the brink. In
Russia famine and pestilence pre-
I vailed, and in Australia nearly every
bank of consequence closed its doors.
American farmers were so hard up
they could hardly buy smoking to
bacco. Such were the conditions in
1893. Looking backward, the period
from which the world is now emerg
ing seems not so gloomy, after all.
I Froylan C. Manjarres as provisional
governor.
Troops under Gen. Guadelepe San
chez battled with the rebels of Miguel
Aleman at Lomalnrga, state of Vera
i Cruz Saturday, and succeeded in driv
ing them further Into the hills, says
an official report issued recently.
ENTER PROTEST AGAINST
RAIL WAGE CONFERENCE
Jewell, Shop Crafts’ Head, Claims
Conference is in Violation
of Law
Chicago.—B. M. Jewell, head of the
shop crafts, today began the presenta
tion of protests from railroad labor
organizations against the legality of
the wage conference held recently
throughout the country between rail
road heads and employes. He claimed
these conferences were not carried
out in accord with the terms of the
transportation act and cited instances
of alleged violation by railroad execu
tives.
Before opening his argument Mr.
Jewell requested of the labor board and
each member individually a report on
the amount of propaganda and “yellow,
sheets” received from the Association
of Railway Executives. He requested
the number of such communications re
ceived and the substance of their state
ments and th* singular Information
about pamphlets from the national
chamber of commerce and other em
ployers’ organizations.
MENZIES Phones 201, 201-2, 207 BRENNEN
CODY PLUMBING, HEATING
and SHEET METAL WORKS
Sanitary Plumbing—Reliable Heating—Guaranteed Workmanship
AU'snta for the Famous
SUNBEAM WARM AIR FURNACE
The Best and Cheapest Furnace on the Market
BEAUTY IS AS BEAUTY DOES.
WOMEN polish their fingernails to make them shiny, and then
powder their noses because they are shiny. And that is all right.
Women also spend six million dollars a year for stuff with which to
tint their faces like they wish nature had tinted them. And that may
be ail right, too.
But a beautiful akin —clear, velvety, with the pink peeking thru —
isn’t put up in boxes. The skin Is the mirror of the body. A beauti
ful skin is the reflection of beautiful health. And gdo of the secrets
of beautiful health Is the dally bath. At best, painted faces are only
Imitations of nature, and often bad Imitations at that.
More beauty, health and happiness grow out of a few minutes
spent each day in a perfectly equipped bathroom than out of any num
ber of minutes spent at a toilet table. A bath a day means exercise,
cleanliness, increased circulation of the blood, stimulation of the or
gans of the body, a ventilated skin. And you can’t beat that for health
and beauty
Buy paint and powder if you will, but don’t fail to provide your
self with a properly heated, properly appointed bathroom. And th»-n
use it every day.
—Repairs a Specialty.
Various newspapers day after day
print more or less concisely what the
congress of the United States does in
its day’s work. Read it every day and
you will wait long before you find any
serious reference to the five million
men out of work in the United States.
It is a curious thing that in a republic
widespread idleness which drives a
few to crime and many to despair, re
presenting a national loss in labor of
more than twice the cost of govern
ment, should arouse no particular in
terest. If a farmer had five horses
eating their heads off, doing no work,
he would blame himself. The nation
has five million men eating their
hearts out, doing no work. If we
could find away to put these men to
work the wages they would earn
would go a long way toward restoring
prosperity.
• • • •
We are willing to give our allies
credit for winning the war, but not
too’ long credit.
• * * •
One of the great changes in the
present-day philosophy of life is the
break in optimism. Unless people be
come thoroughly aroused there Is the
likelihood of a break in civilization
itself. The easy-going optimist is dis
credited today; his theory of an ever
swelling stream of progress is gone
to the academic repair shop. So, also,
those who have always taken it for
granted that our civilization Is beyond
serious hurt must now walk and talk
i softly.
* • • •
Reports at the beginning of the
week indicate a recognition of Mexico
' by the United States within a short
time. President Harding has ex
! changed cordial greetings with Presi
dent Obregon. Recognition is expect
ed to lead to loans by the United
States’ financiers to Mexico.
—THE OLD CATTLEMAN.
This informstlon was desired, he
said, to see whether these organiza
tions “really understood railroad man
agement and its problems.”
At the same time he asked the labor
members for a list of the published
propaganda and contents received from
labor organizations other than rall,-
road labor unions.
Advertise in the Enterprise.
White Lunch
Open Again and
Doing Business
BETTER THAN EVER!
Try a Cup of Our Coffee
With Pure Cream
—HOME MADE PIES—
Mike Miller, Prop.
1 1
THE UNIVERSAL CAR
■ .... .
Now Is The Time!
To Have Your Engine Overhauled. We Will Overhaul
And Burn In Bearings For
$25.00
FORD SCHEDULE
WE GUARANTEE A FACTORY JOB.
Ford Service Station
’Phone 145 Cody, Wyoming.
R. I. Volckmer, wh j has been ill for
some time is improving slowly.
NOTICE TO WATER USERS
You are hereby notified that until
further notice, sprinkling hours in the
town of Cody will be from 11 a. m. un
til 5 p. m. only; this restriction being
made necessary by the inability other
wise .to hare power.
Anyone violating this order will be
fined.
R. R. ROUSSEAU.
33t2 Water Commissioner.
GOOD RANCH FOR RENT
I wish to rent the farming end of
my North Fork ranch for the coming
year. A complete ontlt and a good
deal for the right party.
D. E. HOLLISTER
Room 5, Pioneer wldg.
33tf. Cody, Wyo.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTH
ERS INTERESTED IN THE FINAL
ACCOUNT AND PETITION FOR
DISTRIBUTION. .
In the District Court of the Fifth Ju
dicial District, Park County,
. Wyoming.
In the matter of the estate of Eu
gene Wilder, deceased.
TAKE NOTICE:—That Edward E.
Wilder, surviving executor of the
estate of Eugene Wilder, deceased,
did on the tenth day of March, 1922,
file with the Clerk of the District
Court, his final account and a petition
for distribution of said estate, where
anyone interested may examine the
same and file objections thereto at
any time within thirty days from the
last publication of thia notice. That
the last publication will be on the
Sth day of April, 1922, and if no ob
jections are on file he will make final
settlement and distribution of said
estate on the Sth day of May, 1922,
or so soon thereafter as the said mat
ter can be heard.
EDWARD E. WILDER.
Executor.
Wm. L. Simpson,
Attorney for estate.
First publication March 15,
Last publication April 5.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Lander, Wyoming,
March Sth, 1922.
NOTICE is hereby given that
MAX M. WILDE
of Valley, Wyoming, who, on April 2,
1917, made Homestead Entry, No.
08968, for Lot 1, Sec. 8; Lot 3, Sec.
5; Twp. 48 N„ Rg. 106 W., 6th P. M.;
and a tract of land described by meets
and bounds as follows:
Beginning at Corner No. 1, which
Is the section corner of Sections 4,5,
J, and 9, Twp. 48 N. Rg. 106 W„ Sth
P. M., thence north 89” 55’ east 39.92
chs. to Corner No. 2; thence north
89“ 51' east 1.56 chs. to Corner No. 3;
thence south 0“ 28' east 19.64 chs. to
Corner No. 4; thence south 89” 26'
west 41.68 chs. to corner No. 5; thence
north 0“ 08' east 20.00 chs. to Corner
N& 1, the place of beginning, contain
ing 159.46 aer.’s; H. E. Survey No.
200, List 2-1828; has filed notice of
intention io make Three Year Proof,
to establish claim to the land above
described, before George S. Russell,
Clerk of the District Court, at Cody,
Wyoming, on the 26th day of April,
1922.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Edward L. Jones of Ishawooa, Wyo.
Frank Culp of Valley, Wyo.
Hillis Jordan of Cody, Wyo.
Carl Downing of Ishawooa, Wyo.
IRVING W. WRIGHT, Register.
First publication March 15
publication April 12.
Patronize the advertisers.
GET YOUR MONEY’S WORTH
LUMP COAL $4.25 $7.00
Best in Cody At Mine Delivered
Correct weight; one Price io All
wi«ne 188 Native coal co.
OTTO I. nelson, Manger
' " f *.
| BILLIARDS! |
= iiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiii ' e
I Carom Billiards -j- Pocket Billiards |
| Soft Drinks, Lunch, Cigars |
I PATCH ELL’S I
= NOW LOCATED AT THE IRMA HOTEL
~niiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiii| l ||| l || l | llllll || l | ll ||, lll[llllllll[[[lt|||||||[||||||||||| jp
I ff YOU WANT A REAL MEAL TRY THE I
I I HART case. I I
| GENUINE HOME COOKING
CLEAN LINEN
| EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE ,
| ” AND PIES LIKE MOTHER USED TO MAKE
I —ONLY BETTER |
| Blacksmith Prices Reduced! |
!No. oto No. 3 32.00 per horse. t
n:6\"\ B s° I
Resetting per shoe 35<
I Plow Share Sharpening 564 Pointing and Sharpening SI.OO J:
All Other Work Done at Pre-War Prices
; ;
I SCHWOOB SHOP. I
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 19

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