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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, March 29, 1922, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
Sisters
BY KATHLEEN NORRIS
Chapter 19—Continued
Cherry looked small and pathetic in
her fresh black, and her face was
marked by secret it'cesscnt weeping.
But the nurses and doctors could not
say enough for her self-control; she
was always composed, always quietly
helpful and calm when they saw her,
and she was always busy. From early
morning, when she slipped into the
sick-room, to stand looking at the un
conscious Martin with a troubled, in
tent expression that the nurses came
to know well, until night, she moved
untiringly about the quiet, shaded
house. She supervised the Chinese
boy, saw that the nurses had their
hours for rest and exercise, telephoned,
dusted and arranged the rooms, saw
callers sweetly and patiently, filled
vases with flowers.
Every day she had several vigils In
the sick-room, and every day at least
one long talk with the doctors. Every
afternoon and evening had Its callers;
she and Peter were rarely alone.
Martin was utterly unconscious of
the life that flowed on about him;
sometimes he seemed to recognize
Cherry, and would stare with painful
intentness into her face, but after a
few seconds his gaze would wander
to the strange nurses, and the room
that he had never known, and with
a puzzled sigh he would close his eyes
again, and drift back Into his own
strange world of pain, fever and un
consciousness.
Almost every day there was the
sudden summons and panic In the old
house, Peter going toward the sick
room with a thick beating at his heart.
Cherry entering, white-faced and with
terrified eyes, doctors and nurses gath
ering noiselessly near for the last
acene in the drama of Martin’s suffer
ing. But the release did not come.
There would be murmuring among
the doctors and nurses; the pulse was
gaining, not losing, the apparently
fatal, final symptoms were proving
neither fatal nor final. The tension
would relax; a doctor would go, a
nurse slip from the room; Cherry,
looking anxiously from one face to
another, would breathe more easily.
It was Inevitable, she knew that now—
but It was not to be this minute; it
was not to be this hour I
•‘My dear—my dear!” Peter said to
her one day, when spent and shaken
she came stumbling from Martin’s bed
side and stood dazedly looking from
the window into the soaking October
forest, like a person stunned from a
blow. “My poor little Cherry I If I
could spare you this!”
“Nobody can spare me now I” she
whispered. And very simply and
quietly she added: “If I have been a
fool—if I have a selfish, wicked
girl all my life, I am punished I
“Cherry!” he protested, heartsick to
see her so.
“Was It wrong for us to love each
other, Peter?" she asked In a low tone.
“I suppose it was! I suppose it was!
But it never seemed as if —” she shut
her eyes and shivered—“as if —this—
would come of it!” she whispered.
“This!” he echoed aghast.
“Oh, I think this is punishment,”
Cherry continued, in the same lifeless,
weary tone.
There was a silence. The rain
dripped and dripped from the red
woods, the room In which they stood
was in twilight, even at noon. Peter
could think of nothing to say.
• •••••••
About two weeks after the accident
there was a change in the tone of the
physicians who had been giving al
most all their time to Martin’s case.
There was no visible change in Mar
tin, but that fact in itself was so sur
prising that it was construed into a
definite hope that he would live.
Not as he had lived, they warned
his wife. It would be but a restricted
life; tied to bls couch, or permitted,
at best, to move about within a small
boundary on crutches.
“Martini” his wife exclaimed pite
ously, when this was first discussed.
“He has always been so strong—so
independent I He would rather—he
would infinitely rather be dead I” But
her mind was busy grasping the pos
sibilities, too. “He won’t suffer too
much?” she asked fearfully.
They hastened to assure her that
the chance of his even partial recov
ery was still slight, but that in case
of his convalescence Martin need not
necessarily suffer.
Another day or two went by In the
silent, rain-wrapped house under the
trees; days of quiet footsteps and
whispering, and the lisping of wood
fires. Then Martin suddenly was con
scious, knew his life, languidly smiled
at her, thanked the doctors for oc
casional ease from pain.
“Peter—l’m sorry. It’s terrible for
you—terrible!” he said in his new,
hoarse, gentle voice, when he first saw
In France citizens pay a door and
window tax. In towns of over 100,000
inhabitants the principal of the tax is
fixed at one franc for 1 window, 1.60
francs for two windows and so on.
The tax for doors is 18.80 franca.
Peter. They marveled among them
selves that he knew that Alix was
gone. But to Cherry, in one of the
long hours that she spent sitting be
side him and holding his big. weak, j
strangely white hand, he explained |
one day. “I knew she was killed," he .
said, out of a silence. “I thought we i
both were!”
“How did she ever happen to do it?”
Cherry said. “She was always so sure
of herself—even when she drove fast!”
“I don’t know," he answered. “It
was all like a flash, of course! I
never watched her drive —I had such
confidence in her!”
His Interest dropped; she saw that
the tide of pain was slowly rising
again, and glanced at the clock. It
was two; he might not have relief
until four. In his own eyes she saw
reflected the apprehension of her own.
“You might ask Peter to play some
of that —that rambly stuff he was
playing yesterday?" he suggested. '
Cherry, only too happy to have him
want anything, to have* him helped by j
anything, flew to find fieter. Busy
with one of the trays that were really
beginning to interest and please the
invalid now, she told herself that the
hoube was a different place, now that
one nurse was gone, the doctors com
ing only for brief calls, and the dear, j
familiar sound of the old piano echo
ing through the rooms.
Martin came from the fiery furnace
changed in soul and body. It was a
thin, gentle, strangely patient man
who was propped in bed for his
Thanksgiving dinner, and whose pain
woru face turned with an appreciative
smile to the decorations and the gifts
that made bls room cheerful.
The heavy cloud lightened slowly
but steadily; Martin had a long talk,
dreaded by Cherry from the first hours
of the accident, with his physicians.
He bore the ultimatum with unex
pected fortitude.
“Let me get this straight," he said
slowly. “The arm is O. K. and the
leg, but the back —"
Cherry, kneeling beside him, her
hands on his, drew a wincing breath.
Martin reassured her with an indul
gent nod.
“I’ve known It right along!" he told
her. He looked at the doctors. “It’s
no go?”
“I don't see why I should deceive
you, my dear boy,” said the younger
doctor, who had grown very fond of
him. “You can still beat me at bridge,
you know, you can read and write, and
come to the table, after awhile; you
have your devoted wife to keep finding
new things for you to do I Next sum
mer now—a chair out In the garden—”
Cherry was fearfully watching hei
husband’s face.
“We’ll al) do what we can to make
It easy, Mart 1" she whispered, in
tears.
He looked at her with a whimsical
smile.
“Mind very much taking care of a
helpless man all your life?” he asked
with a hint of his old confident man
ner.
“Oh Mart, I mind only for you!” Rhe
said. Peter, standing behind the doc
tors. slipped from the room unnoticed
Late that evening, when Martin wai
asleep. Cherry carat noiselessly from
c I fti
Sul !
“O, Marti I M'nd Only for You!’
She Said.
the sick-room, to find Peter alone in
the dimly lighted sitting room. He
glanced at her, feeling rather than
hearing her presence, and called her
“Coma over* here, will you. Cherry*
I want to apeak to you." .
She came, with an inquiring and yet
not wholly unconscious to the
fireside, and hs stood up to greet her
"Tiredr* be asked, in an unnatural
voice.
“I—l was Just going to bed,” she
answered, hesitatingly. But she sat
down, nevertheless; sank comfortably
into the chair opposite his own, and
stretched her little feet, crossed at th«
ankle, before her, as if she were in
deed tired.
He knelt down beside her chair, and
gathered her cold hands into one of
his own. “Whut are you and I going
to do?” he asked.
She looked at him In terror.
“But all that Is changed!” she said,
quickly, fearfully.
“Why is it changed?” he countered.
“I love you—l have always loved you.
since the days long ago, in this very
house! I can’t stop it now. And you
love me, Cherry!’*
“‘Yes, I shall always love you," she
answered, agitatedly, after a pause In
which she looked at him with troubled
eyes. “But—but—you must see that
we cannot —cannot think of all that
now," she added with difficulty. 27
couldn’t fall Martin now, when he
needs me so!”
"He needs you now," Peter conced
ed, “and I don’t ask you to do any
thing that must distress him now. But
in a few months, when his mother
comes down for a visit you must tell
them honestly that you care for me,”
he Raid.
Cherry was trembling violently.
“But how could I!" Rhe protested.
••Tell him that I am going away, de
serting him when he most needs me!”
Peter had grown very pale.
“But—” he stammered, bis face
close to hers—“but you cannot mean
that this Is the end?”
She moved her lips as If she was
about to speak ; looked at him blankly.
Then suddenly tears came, and she
wrenched her hands free from his,
and laid her arms about his neck. Her
wet cheek was pressed to his own, and
he put his arms tightly about the lit
tle shaken figure.
“Peteri* she whispered, desolately.
And after a time, when the violence of
her sobs was lessened, and she was
breathing more quietly, she said
again: "Peter 1 We can never dream
that dream again."
“We shall dream It again," be cor
rected her.
Cherry did not answer for a long
while. Then she gently disengaged
herself from his arms, and sat erect.
Her tears were ended now, and her
voice firmer and surer.
“No; never again!* she told him.
“I’ve been thinking about It, al) these
days, and I’ve come to see what Is
right, as 1 never did before. Alix
never knew about us. Peter —and
that's been the one thing for which 1
could be thankful in ail this time! But
Alix had ouly one hope for me, and
that was that somehow Martin and 1
would come to be —well, to be nearer
to each other, and that somehow he
and 1 would make a success of our |
marriage, would spare—well, let’s say
the family name, from all the disgrace
and publicity of a divorce —”
“But, Cherry, my child—" Peter ex
postulated. “You cannot sacrifice all
your life to the fancy that no one else
can take your place with him—”
"That," she said, steadily, “la just
what I must do!”
Peter looked at her for a few sec
onds without speaking.
"You don’t love him," he said.
"No,” she admitted, gravely. “I
don’t love him—not in the way you
mean.”
"He is nothing to you," Peter argued.
"As a matter of fact, it never was
what a marriage should be. It was
always—always—a mistake.”
"Yes," she conceded, sadly, "it was
always a mistake I"
"Then there is nothing to bind you
to him!" Peter added.
“No—and there isn’t Alix to distress
now!” she agreed, thoughtfully. "And
yet," she went on, suddenly, “I do this
more for Alix than for any one !*
Peter looked at her m silence,
looked back at the last flicker of the
fire.
“You will change your mind after
awhile I" he said.
Cherry rose from the chair, and
stood with dropped head and troubled
eyes, looking down at the flame.
"No, I shall never change my
mind!” she said, in a low tone that
was still strangely firm and final for
her. “For five or ten or twenty or
thirty years I shall always be where
Martin Is. caring for him. amusing
him, making a life for him." And
Cherry raised her glorious blue eyes
In which there was a pure and an up
lifted look that Peter had never seen
there before. “It is what Dad and
Alix would have wished," she finished,
solemnly, “and I do it for them 1"
Peter did not answer; and after a
moment she went quietly and quickly
from the room, with the new air of
quiet responsibility that she had worn
ever since the accident.
CHAPTER XX.
Peter saw, with a sort of stupefac
tion, that life was satisfying her now
as life had never satisfied restless, ex
acting little Cherry before.
She spent much of her free time by
her husband’s side, amusing him aa
skillfully as a mother. He was get
ting so popular that she bad to be
ready for callers every day. Would he
like her to keep George Sewall for
dinner, when they could play dominoes
again? Would he like the table with
the picture puzzle? He would like
just to talk? Very well; they would
talk.
Martin’s day was so filled aud
divided with small pleasures that It
was apt to amaze him by passing toe
quickly. He had special breakfasts,
he bad his paper, bls hair was brushed
and bls bed remade a dozen times a
day. Cherry shared her mall, which
was always heavy now, with him; sht
flitted into the sick-room every few
minutes with small messages or gifts
With her bare, bright head, her buaj
white hands, her voice all motherly
amusement and sympathy and sweet
ness, she had never seemed so much
a wife. She had the pleasantest laugh
in the world, and she often laughed
The si ok-room was kept with exquisite
simplicity, with such freshness, bare
ness, and order as made It a place of
delight. One day Cherry brought homt
a great Vikory bowl of silvery glass
and a dozen drifting goldfish, and Mar
tin never tired of watching them Idly
while ho listened to her reading.
“Cherry,” Peter said, on a wet Janu
ary day, when he came upon her in the
dining room, contentedly arranging a
fragrant mass of wet violets, "I think
Martin’s out of the woods now. I be
lieve I’ll be moving along.'"
“Oh, but we wen-, you always, Pe
ter I” she said. Innocently regretful.
The ghost of a pained smile flitted
across his face.
"Thank you,” he said, gently. “But
I think ! will go.” he added, mildly.
She made no further protest.
"But where?" she asked, sympa
thetically.
"I don’t know. I shall take Buck
start off toward the Mg mountains.
I’ll write you now and then, of course!
I’m going home, first!"
“Just now,” Cherry mused, sadly,
"perhaps it is best—for you—to get
away! Now that Martin is so much
better." she added, In a little burst. "I
do feel so sorry for you. Peter! I
know how you feel. I shall miss bor
always, of course," said Cherry, "but
I have him.”
“I try not to think of her,” Peter
said, flinging up his head.
“When you do," Cherry said, earn
estly, giving him more of her attention
than had been usual, of late, “Here i«
something to think, Peter. It’s this:
we have so much to be thankful for,
l»ecause she never—knew 1 It was
madness," Cherry went on, eagerly,
'•sheer madness —that is clear now. I
don't try to explain it, because it’s all
been t washed away by the frightftn
thing that happened. I’m different
now; you’re different —1 don’t know
how we ever thought we could —”
There was a silence during which
she looked at him anxiously, but the
expression on his face did not alter,
and he did not speak.
“And what I think we ought to be
thankful for.” she resumed, “is that
Alix would rather —she would rather
have it this way. She told me that
she would be heart-broken if there hau
been any actual separation between
me aud Martin, and how much worse
that would have been —what we
planned, 1 mean. She was spared
that, and we were spared—l see it
now—what would have ruined both our
lives. We were brought to our senses,
and the awakening only came a little
sooner than it would have come any
way I”
Peter had walked to the window,
and was looking out at the shabby
winter trees that were dripping rain,
and at the beaten garden, where the
drenched chrysanthemums had been
bowed to the soaked earth.
“Here, in Dad’s home,” Cherry said,
coming to stand beside him, “1 see
how* wicked and how mad 1 was. In
another twenty-four hours It would
have been too late —you don’t know
how often I wake up in the night and
shiver, thinking that I And as It is,
I am here In the dear old house; and
Martin —weH, you can see that even
Martin’s life is going to be far happier
than it ever was! It’s such a joy to
me," she added, with the radiant look
she often wore when her husband’s
comfort was under consideration, “to
feel that we need never worry about
the money end of things—there’s
enough for what we need forever I"
“You must never worry about mon.
ey,” he told her. "And if ever you
need it—if It is a question of a long
trip, or of more operations—if there is
any chance—"
“I shall remember that I have a big
brother!" she said. >
The room was scented by the sweet,
damp flowers, and by the good odor
of lazily burning logs; yet to Peter
there was chill and desolateness In the
air. Cherry took up the glass bowl In
both careful hands, and went away In
the direction of the study, but he stood
at the window for a long time staring
dully out at the battered chrysanthe
mums and the swishing branches, and
the steadily falling rain.
A few days later, on a day of un
certain sunshine and showers, Peter
left them. To Cherry Peter’s going
was a relief; It burned one more
bridge behind her. It confirmed her
in the path she had chosen; it was to
her spirit like the cap that marks the
accepted student nurse, or like the
black coif that replaces the postulant's
w’hlte veil of probation.
He had been In the downstairs bed
room, talking with Martin, for per
haps an hour; he hud drawn them a
rough sketch of the little addition to
the house that Cherry meant some day
to build next to the study, and hex and
Martin had been discussing the de
tails. Cherry was sweeping the wet,
dun-colored leaves from the old porch
when a sudden step in the doorway be
hind her made her look up.
Peter had come out of the house,
with Buck beside him. He wore his
old corduroy clothes and his shabby
cap, but there was something In his
aspect that made her ask:
“Not going?”
“Yes, I’m going now I" he said.
Sho rested her broom against the
thick trunk of the old banksla, and
i /rl
■W “®
-Ye., I’m Going Now!” He Mid,
rubbed her two hands together, and
came to the top of the steps to say
good-by. And standing there, under
the rose tree, she linked her arm about
it. looking up through the branches,
where the shabby foliage of last year
lingered,
“How fast It’s grown since that
terrific pruning we gave it all that
I long time ago!” she said.
“Little more than six years ago,
Cherry!” he reminded her.
“Only six years—” She was ob
viously amazed. “It doesn't seem pos
sible that all this has happened In six
years I" she exclaimed.
(TO BE CONTINUED)
I
Serial No. C 13745
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin Oil and Gas Com
pany for a Un'ted States Patent to
the Wilson No. 2 011 Placer Min
ing Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice Is hereby given that in
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon
Basin OH and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with Its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne, Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O'Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground kno\vn as the
"Wilson No. 2 OU Placer Mining
Claim,” situate, lying and being in
•Park County, Wyoming, has made ap
plication to the United States for a
patent for said oil placer mining
Claim, which is more particularly de
scribed as follows:
The North Half of the Northeast
Quarter (N(4NE%) oft Section Six
(6): and the Northwest Quarter of
the Northwest Quarter
of Section F've (5), Township Fifty
(50) North of Range One Hundred
(100) West of the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Wilson No. 2 011 Placer Mining Claim
is of record In the office of the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Otticlo Register of
Deeds tn and tor Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, in
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 247 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the s. rface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
j patented, is bounded as follows:
I On the north by the Purple and
| McMahan Oil Placer Mining Claims;
i On the south by the Wilson No. 1
Oil Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Anderson OU
OU Placer Mining Claim;
On the oast by the Wilson No. 3 OU
Placer Mining Claim;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law,
with the Register ot the United
States Land Office at Lander, Frc
mont County, Wyoming, they will be
barred by virtue ot the provisions of
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT,
Register.
First publication March 29
Last publication May 24th —1922
Serial No. 013746
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin Oil and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the Polly Oil Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice is hereby given that in
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon
Basin OU and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state ot Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne, Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fart, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as the
"Polly OU Placer Mining Claim,"
situate, lying and being In Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which la
more particularly described as fol
lows:
The Southwest Quarter (SWI4) ot
Section Five (5), Township Fifty
one (51) North of Range One Hun
dred (100) West of the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Polly Oil Placer Mining Claim
Is of record in the office ot the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Officio Register of
Deeds in and for Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, in
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 262 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Sidney OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Kutie OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Pauline Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Nicholas Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
Any and all persons claltrlng ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law,
with the Register ot the United
Stateo Land Office at Lander, Fre-
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 29, 19 2 j
mont County, Wyoming, they wlll’ba
barred by virtue of the provisions of
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT.
Register.
First publication March 15, 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
Serial No. 013743
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin OU and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
- the Red OU Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice Is hereby given that In
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon
Basin OU and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne, Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, Its duly authorized
agent and attorney tn fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as the
"Red Oil Placer Mining Claim.”
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty. Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which is
more particularly described as fol
lows:
Lots Three and Four (3 & 4) and
the East Half of the Southwest
Quarter (EHSWI4) of Section Thir
ty-one (31), Township Fifty-one (51)
North ot Range One Hundred (100>
West of the 6th P. M.
The notice ot location of said
Red Oil Placer Mining Claim
Is of record In the office of the Coun
ty CJerk and Ex-Officio Register of
Deeds in and for Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, in
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 231 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained apd hereby sought to be
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Josephine Olt
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Anderson Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Purple OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Elizabeth Oit
Placer Mining Claim and vacant un
occupied Government land;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim end premises or any part there
of, above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law.
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander. Fre
mont County, Wyoming, they will be
barred by virtue of the provisions ot
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT.
Register.
First publication March 15, 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
Serial No. 013744
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin OH and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the Anderson Oil Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office.
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice Is hereby given that in
pursuance ot Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned. The Oregon
Basin OU and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with Its principal office and place ot
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O'Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres ot oil
placer mining ground known as the
"Anderson OU Placer Mining Claim."
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which is
more particularly described as fol
lows:
I-ots Three, Four and Five (3, 4 &
5) and the Southeast Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter (SEI4NW4) of
Section Six (6), Township Fifty (50)
North of Range One Hundred (1001-
West of the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Anderson OU Placer Mining Claim
is of record in the office ot the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Offlclo Register of
Deeds in and for Park County. State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming. °
Book No. 6 of Location Notice R*
cords at Page No. 228 thereof.
The! said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to bo
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Red OU
Placer Mln’ng Cialm;
On the south by Vacant unoccupied
Government land;
On the east by the Wilson No. 3
and Wilson No. 1 Oil Placer Mining
Claims;
On the west by Vacant unoccupied
Government land;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the bald oil placer mining
cinlin and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law.
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fre
mont County, Wyoming, they will be
barred by virtue of the provisions of
said statutes.
IRVING W WRIGHT,
Reg? iter.
First publication March 15, 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.

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