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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, April 05, 1922, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
Sisters
BY KATHLEEN NORRIS
Chapter 20—Continued
He d|d not answer. He had her
hand now for farewells, and perhaps,
with the thought of those short six
years had come also the thought that
this slender figure in the housewifely
blue linen, this exquisite little head,
so trim and demure despite all its
rebel tendrils of gold, this lovely face.
Mill the face of a child, with a child's
trusting, uplifted eyes, might have
been his. The old home might have
been their home, and perhaps—who
knows, there might have been a new
Cherry and a new Peter beginning to
look eagerly out at life through the
screen of the old rose vine!
Too late now. A single instant of
those lost years might have brought
him all this, but there was no going
back. He tfut his arm about her, and
kissed her forehead, and said: “God
bless you. Cherry !”
“God bless you, dear!” she an
swered gravely. She watched the tall
figure, with its little limp, and with
the dog leaping and circling about it
in ecstasy, until the redwoods closeu
around him. Then she took up the
broom again, and slowly and thought
fully crossed the old porch, and shut
the door.
Peter, walking with long strides,
and with a furrowed brow and absent
eyes, crossed the village, and climbed
once more the old trail that led up tv
the cabin.
It was dusted, orderly, complete; he
and Alix might have left it yesterday.
Kow had seen him coming, he thought,
and had bad time to light the fire,
which was blazing freshly up to the
chimney’s great throat. He sat down,
staring at the flames.
Buck pushed open the swinging
door between the pantry and the sit
ting room, and came in, a question In
his bright eyes, his great plumy tall
beating the floor as he lay down at
Peter’s side. Presently the dog laid
his nose on Peter’s knee and poured
forth a faint sound that was not quite
a whine, not quite a sigh, and rose
restlessly, and went to the closed door
of Alix’s room, and pawed it, bls eager
nose to the threshold.
“Not here, old fellow!” Peter said,
stroking the silky head under his
hand.
He had not been In this room since
the day of her death. It struck him
as strangely changed, strangely and
heartrendingly familiar. The windows
were closed, as Alix had never had
them closed, winter or summer, rain
or sunshine. Her books stood in their
old order, her student's Shakespeare,
and some of her girlhood's books,
“Little Women,” and “Uncle Max.” In
the closet, which exhaled a damp and
woody smell, were one or two of the
boyish-looking hats he had so often
seen her crush carelessly on her dark
hair, and the big belted coat that was
as plain as his own, and the big boots
she wore when she tramped about the
poultry yard, still spattered with pale,
dry mud. Her father's worn little Bi
ble lay on the table, and beside It an
other book, “Duck Raising for tbe
Market,” with the marks of muddy
and mealy hands still lingering on its
cover.
Suddenly, evoked by these silent
witnesses to her busy and happy life,
the whole woman seemed to stand be
side Peter, the tall, eager, vital woman
who had been at home here, who had
ruled the cabin with a splendid and
vital personality. He seemed to feel
her near him again, to see the Inter
ested eyes, the high cheek-bones
touched with scarlet, the wisp of hair
that would fall across her face some
times when she was deep In baking,
or preserving, or poultry-farming, and
that she would brush away with the
back of an impatient hand, only to
have It slip loose again.
One of her kitchen aprons, caught In
the current of air from the opened
door, blew about on its hook. He re
membered her, on many a wintry day,
buttoned into just such a crisp apron,
radiantly busy and brisk In her kitch
en, stirring and chopping, moving con
stantly between stove and table. With
strong hands still showing traces of
flour she would sit beside him
at the piano, to play’a duet with her
characteristic dash and finish, only to
jump up in sudden compunction, with
an exclamation: “Oh, my ducks—l’d
forgotten them I Oh, the poor little
wretches 1”
And she would be gone, leaving a
streak of wet, fresh air through the
w'arm house from the open door, and
he would perhaps glance from a win
dow to see her, roughly coated and
booted, ploughing about her duck yard,
delving into barrels of grain, turning
on faucets, wielding a stubby old
broom.
She loved her life, he mused, with
a bitter heartache, as he stood here
in her empty room. Sometimes he had
marveled at the complete and unques
tioning joy she had brought to It Pe
ter reminded himself that never In
their years together had he beard her
oomplain about anything, or seem to
or at a loss.
■■■ - . '■ -
Phone news items to No. 9.
“We’ve always thought of Cherry as
the child!” he thought “But 11
she, Alix, who was the real child. She
never grew up. She never entered Into
the time of moods and self-analysis
and jealousies and desires I She would
have played and picnicked ail her
life—”
His heart pressed like a dull pain
In his chest. Dully, quietly, he went
out to the fire again, and dully end
quietly moved through the day. Her
books and music might stand as they
were, her potted ferns and her scat
tered small possessions—the sewing
basket that she always handled wltt]
a boy's awkwardness, and the camera
she used so well —should keep their
places. But he went to her desk,
thinking In this long, solitary evening,
to destroy various papers that she
might wish destroyed before the cabin
was deserted. And here be found ber
letter.
He found It only after be had some
what explored the different small
drawers and pigeonholes of the desk,
drawers and pigeonholes which were,
to ms surprise, ail in astonishing or
der for Alix. Everything was marked,
tied, pocketed; her accounts were bal
anced, and If she had anywhere left
private papers, they were at least no
where to be found.
Seeing In all this a dread confirma
tion of his first suspicion of her death,
Peter nevertheless experienced a shock
when he found her letter.
It had been placed In an empty
drawer, face up, and was sealed, and
addressed simply affix' his name.
He sat holding it in his hand, and
moments passed before be could open
iu
So it had been true, then, the fear
that he had tried all these weeks to
crush? He had been weighing, meas
uring, remembering, until his very
soul was sick with the uncertainty.
His mind had been a confused web of
memories, of this casual word and
that look, of what she had possibly
beard, had probably seen, had suspect
ed—known—
Now he would know. He tore open
the envelope, and the dozen written
lines were before his eyes. The let
ter was dated, a most unusual thing
for Alix to do, and “Saturday, one
o’clock,” was written under the date.
It was the day of her death.
He read:
“Peter, Dear—Don’t feel too badly If
I find a stupid way out. I've been
thinking for several days about it.
You've done so much for me, and after
you, of course, there's no one but
Cherry. She could be free now, he
couldn't prevent it. When I saw your
face a few minutes ago I. knew we
couldn't fight it. Remember, this is
our secret. And always remember that
1 want you to be happy because I love
you so 1”
It was unsigned.
Peter sat staring at it for a while
without moving, without the stir of a
changing expression on his face. Then
ne folded it up, and put it In the pock
et of his coat, and went out to the
back yard, where Kow was feeding the
chickens. The wet, dark day was end
ing brilliantly in a wash of red sun
set light that sent long shadow's from
the young fruit trees, and touched
every twig with a dull glow.
“Kow,” Peter said, after an effort
to speak that was unsuccessful. The
Chinese boy looked at him solicitous
ly; for Peter’s face was ashen, and
about his mouth were drawn lines.
“Kow,” he said, “I go now!’
“Go now other house?” Kow nodded,
glancing toward the valley.
But Peter jerked bls head instead
toward the bare ridge.
“No, I go now—not come back!” he
said, briefly. “Tonight—maybe Bo
linas—tomorrow, Inverness. I don’t
know. By and by tbe big mountains,
Kow—by and by I forget!”
Tears glittered in the Chinese boy’s
eyes, but he smiled with a great air
of cheer.
“I keep house 1” be promised.
The dog came fawning and spring
ing trom the stables, and Peter whis
tled to him.
“Come on Buck! We're going now!*
He opened the farmyard gate where
her hand had so often rested, crossed
the tnuddy corral, opened another
gate, and struck off across the darken
ing world toward the ridge. The last
sunlight lingered on crest and tree-top,
tangled Itself redly In the uppermost
branches of a few tall redwoods, and
was gone. Twilight—a long twilight
that had in it some hint of spring—lay
softly over the valley; the mountain
loomed high In the clear shadow.
Gaining the top of the first ridge, he
paused and looked back at the cabin,
tbe little brown housit that be had
built almost fifteen years ago. He re
membered that it was in the beginning
a sort of experiment; his mother and
he were too much alone in their big
city house, and she had suggested,
with rare wisdom, that as did not
care for society, and as his travels al
ways meant great loneliness for her,
he should have a little eyrie of his
own, to which he might retreat when
ever the fancy touched him.
She liked Del Monte and Tahoe, her
self, but she had come to Mill Valley
now and then in the days of his first
wild delight in its freedom and beau
ty, silk-gowned and white-gloved and
very much disliking dust. She had
sent him plants, roses, and fruit trees,
and she had told him one day that he
had a neighbor in the valley who was
an old friend of hers, a Doctor Strick
land, a widower, with children.
He remembered sauntering up the
opposite canyon to duly call upon this
inventor-physician one day, and his
delight upon finding a well-read, mu
sic-loving, philosophic, erratic man,
who had at once recognized a kindred
spirit, and who had made the younger
man warmly welcome.
Presently on the, first call, an en-
chanting Tittle glr! In a shabby smock
had come In —a little girl all dimples,
demureness and untouched boyish
beauty. She had said that “Anne wath
mad wiv her. and that Alix—she
managed to lisp the name, “wath up
In the madrone!”
A somewhat older child, named Alix,
a freckled, leggy little person with
enormous front teeth, had proved the
claim by failing out of the madrone.
and had received no sympathy for a
bump, hut a—to him—rather surpris
ing censure. He had yet to realize
that nothing ever hurt Alix, but that
she always ruined her clothes, and
frequently hurt other persons and oth
er things. He found her a spirited, en
thusiastic little person, extremely ar
ticulate. and quite unself-consclous.
and she had entertained him with an
excited account of a sex feud that was
being pushed with some violence at her
school, and had used expressions that
rather shocked Peter. A quiet third
girl—a niece, he gathered—bad joined
IM
fM
Suddenly She Seemed Again te B«
Beside Him.
the group, a gm with braids and clean
hands, who elucidated:
“Alix and I don’t like our teacher!*
“She’s a sneak and a skunk!” Alix
had frankly contributed. Cherry, now
quietly established in ber father’s lap,
had smiled with mischievous enjoy
ment; nobody else, to Peter’s surprise,
had paid this extraordinary remark the
slightest attention. He remembered
that he had fancied only the smallest
of these children, and bad been glad
when they all went out of the room.
Looking down at the cabin, the
years slipped past him like a flying
film, and it was the present again, and
Alix —Alix w’as gone.
He roused himself, spoke to the uog.
and they went ion their way again.
Mud squelched beneath P-jter’a boots
in tbe roadway; the dog sprang light
ly from clump to clump of dried grass.
But when they left the road, and cut
straight across the rise of the hillside,
the ground was firmer, and the two fig
ures moved swiftly ..through th* dark
night. The early stars came out, and
showed them, silhouetted against the
sky above Alix’s beloved Tamalpals,
the man’s erect form with Its slight
limp, the dog following faithfully, his
plump tail and feathered ruff showing
a dull luster in tbe starlight.
Cherry, with her violet eyes and
corn-colored hair, Cherry, with her lit
tle hands gathered in his, and her
heart beating against his heart, and
Alix, his chum, his companion, his
comrade on so many night walks un
der the stars—be had lost them both.
But it was Alix who was closest to his
thoughts tonight, Alix, the thought of
whom was gradually gripping his
heart and soul with a new pain.
Alix was his own; Cherry had never
been his own. It was for him to com
fort Cherry, It had always been his
mission to comfort Cherry, since the
days of her broken dolls and cut fin
gers. But Alix was his own comfort
er, and Alix might have been laughing
and stumbling and chattering beside
him here, in the dark, wet woods, full
of a child’s happy satisfaction in the
moment and confidence in the mor
row.
“Alix, my wife 1” he said softly,
aloud. “I loved Cherry—always. But
you were mine—you were mine. We
belonged to each other —for better and
for worse—and I have let you go!”
He went on and on and on. They
were plunging down hill now, under
the trees. He would see a light after
a while, and sleep for a few hours, and
have a hunter's breakfast, and he gone
again. And he knew that for weeks—
for months—perhaps for years, he
would wander so, through the great
mountains, with their snow and their
forests, over the seas. In strange cities
and stranger solitudes. Always alone,
always moving, always remembering.
That would be his life. And some day
—some day perhaps he would come
back to the valley she had loved—
But even now he recoiled in dis
taste from that hour. To see the fa
miliar faces, to come up to the cabin
again, to touch the music and the
books—
Worse, to find Cherry a little older,
happy and busy in her. life of sacri
fice, not needing him, not very much
wanting the reminder of the old tragic
times—
An owl cried in the woods; the
mournful sound floated and drifted
away into utter silence. Some small
animal, meeting the death its brief
life had evaded a hundred times,
screamed shrilly, and was silent.
Great branches, stirred by the night
wind, moved high above his head, and
when there was utter silence, Peter
could 1 hear the steady, soft rush of the
ocean, dulled here fb the sound of a
quiet breathing.
•••••••
Suddenly she seemed again to be
beside him. He semed to see the dark,
animated face, the* slender, tall gir>
wrapped in her big, rough coat. He
seemed to hear her vibrating voice
with that new, tender note in It tha
he had noticed when she last spoke t<
him.
•TH go home ahead of you, Peter
and wait for you there!”
Tears suddenly flooded his eyes. an<
he put his hand over them and presser
« there, standing still, while the wavi
of tender and poignant and exqulsit'
memories broke over him.
“We’ll go on. Buck,” he whispered
looking up through the trees at i
strip of dark sky spangled with coir
stars. “We’ll go un. She’s —she’:
waiting for us somewhere, old fel
lowI”
[THE END’
MRS. ROXA S. KIRBY
■Hr R
Jr
Since Mrs. Roxa S. Kirby, the first
woman to be elected an assessor, as
sumed office as county assessor of
Camplbell county, Wyoming (which is
exactly the size of the state of Con
necticut), the “hard-boiled” property
owner who wAs wont to drop in and
“cuss out” the assessor for “overvalu
ing” his property, has become as rare
there as the dodo. In fact, he “ain't.”
OKLAHOMA GOVERNOR IS
INDICTED FOR BRIBERY
Operation of Defunct Bank Is Made
Basis of Indictment; Governor
Submits to Arrest
Okmulgee. Okla.—Gov. J. B. A.
Robertson of Oklahoma submitted to
arrest here Thursday on a charge of
accepting a bribe to permit operation
of the Guaranty State bank of Okmul
gee while It was In an Insolvent con
dition. The governor immediately
gave bond of $5,000 for his appear
ance at trial.
The charge against Governor Robert
son was based on a joint Indictment
returned by the grand jury here nam
ing the executive and Fred Dennis,
former state banking commissioner, as
recipients of a $25,000 bribe, from ’John
R. Bbold, wealthy oil operator and vice
president of the bank. Eleven other
persKiua were indicted by the grand
jury of charges of illegal banking
manipulations.
Accompanied by Col. B. S. Markham
of the Oklahoma national guard, and
his attorney. J. D. Lydlek, Governor
Robertson arrived here from Okla
homa City. The trip was made by au
tomobile. As the executive's motor car
drew up in front of the office of Raton
A Carter, local attorneys, who have
been employed as counsel. Sheriff
Frank Sowers of Okmulgee county,
appeared. After greeting Governor
Robertson cordially, he said:
“Governor, I’ve got a warrant flor
you.”
The governor accepted service and
Immediately w-.*nt Into the offices of
his local attorneys and signed his bond
totalling securities at SBOO,OOO.
The governor then issued ttm fol
lowing written statement:
“This Indictment, coming as it does
after the events of two weeks ago, Is
no surprise to me nor to any of my
friends. I am here to meet the Issues
without delay. The matter so far as
I nni concerned Is in the hands of my
attorneys whose advice I win follow.
That is all I have to say at present.”
DISTRIBUTION OF SEED
FUND TO START SOON
Main Office Will Be Open*! at Grand
Forks Immediately; Will Dis
tribute $1,500,000
Washington.—Distribution of the sl,-
500,000 provided in the seed loan act,
just signed by President Harding, for
relieving the acute stress of fanners in
the crop failure area of the northwest,
will begin immediately, the department
of agriculture announced Thursday.
Arrangements have been made for
opening a branch office at Grand
Forks. N. D., as was done in the case
of previous government loans for the
relief of farmers in that section. The
relief is provided for farmers in the
“crop failure” «r*> for tbe purchsa® ft
spring-grown grain for «*eed7 which in
cludes wheat, oats, barley and flax.
The area comprises North Dakota,
northern counties of South Dakota,
Montana, several counties In Idabo,
and Washington.
Farmers desiring loans should make
application to tbelr county agent, to
the director of extension work in their
respective states, or directly ,to the
seed loan office at Grand Forks.
The largest natural gas field ever
discovered was recently uncovered In
northern Louisiana. It covers an
area of 212 square miles.
Serial No. 013745
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Baaln Oil and Gaa Com
pany fpr a Un'ted States Patent to
the Wilson No. 2 011 Placer Min
ing Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16. 1922
Notice is hereby given that In
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, tbe undersigned, The Oregon
Basin Oil and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganlzed and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O'Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney In fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as the
“Wilson No. 2 Oil Placer Mining
Claim,” situate, lying and being in
Park County, Wyoming, has made ap
plication to the United States for a
patent for said oil placer mining
Claim, which is more particularly de
scribed as follows:
The North Half of the Northeast
Quarter (NHNEI4) off Section Six
(6); and the Northwest Quarter of
the Northwest Quarter (NWI4NWU)
ot Section Five (6). Township Fifty
(50) North ot Range. One Hundred
(100) West of the 6th P. M.
The notice ot location of ’said
Wilson No. 2 011 Placer Mining Claim
is of record in the office ot the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Officio Register ot
Deeds In and tor Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, in
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 247 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the s. rface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Purpte and
McMahan Oil Placer Mining Claims;
On the south by the Wilson No. 1
Oil Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Anderson OU
Oil Placer Mining Claim:
On the east by the Wilson No. 3 Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for. are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der. within the time provided by law.
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fro
mont County, Wyoming, they will be
barred by virtue ot the provisions ot
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT,
Register.
First publication March 29
Last publication May 24th —1922
Serial No. 013746
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin Oil and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
I the Polly OU Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice Is hereby given that in
I pursuance ot Chapter 6. Title 32 ot
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon
Basin Oil and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganlzed and existing under
the laws ot the state of Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in tact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres ot oil
placer mining ground known as tbe
“Polly Oil Placer Mining Claim,”
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
■the United States for a patent tor
said oil placer mining claim, which Is
more particularly described as fol
lows:
The Southwest Quarter (SW|4) of
Section Five /5), Township Fifty
one (61) North of Range One Hun
dred (100) West ot the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Polly Oil Placer Mining Claim
Is of record In the office of the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Officio Register of
Deeds in and for Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, In
Book No. 6 ot Location Notice Re
cords at Pago No. 262 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to-
I gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Sidney Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Katie OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Pauline OK
Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Nicholas OH
Placer Mining Claim;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
tor, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law,
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fre-
WECNESDAY, APRIL 5.
mont County, Wyoming, they will b*
barred by virtue ot the provisions off
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT.
Register.
First publication March 15, 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
• (
Serial No. 013743
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin OH and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the Red OU Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 192 S
Notice 1b hereby given that in
pursuance ot Chapter 6, Title 32 ot
the Revised Statutes ot the United'
States, the undersigned. The Oregon
Basin Oil and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganlzed and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with Its principal office and place or
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by-
Wllfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres ot oil
placer mining ground known as the
“Red Oil Placer Mining Claim,”
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty. Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which Is
more particularly described as fol
lows :
Lots Three and Four (3 & 4) and
the East Half of the Southwest
Quarter (EMtSWU) ot Section Thir
ty-one (31), Township Fifty-one (51)
North of Range One Hundred (100>
West ot the 6th P. M.
The notice ot location ot said
Red Oil Placer Mining Claim,
is ot record In the office of the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Offlclo Register ot
Deeds In and for Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming. In
Book No. 6 ot Location Notice Bo
cords at Page No. 231 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
patented, Is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Josephine Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Anderson Oft
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Purple Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On tbe west by the Elizabeth OU
Placer Mining Claim and vacant un
occupied Government land;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied'
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, witbin the time provided by law.
with the Register* of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fre
mont County, Wyoming, they will be
barred by virtue ot the provisions ot
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT.
Register.
First publication March 15. 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
Serial No. 013744
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin Oil and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the Anderson Oil Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander. Wyoming,
February 16. 1922
Notice is hereby given that lt»
pursuance ot Chapter 6, Title 32 ot
the Revised Statutes ot the United
States, the undersigned, Tbe Oregon
Basin Oil and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganlzed and existing under
the laws of the state ot Wyoming,
with Its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres ot oil
placer mining ground known as the
“Anderson Oil Placer Mining Claim.”
situate, lying and being In Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which Is
more particularly described as fol
lows:
Lots Three. Four and Five (3. 4 &
5) and the Southeast Quarter ot th®
Northwest Quarter (SEI4NWU) of
Section Six (6), Township Fifty (60)
North ot Range One Hundred (100>
West of the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Anderson OU ’.'lacer Mining Claim
Is of record In the office ot the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Offlclo Register ot
Deeds in and for Park County, State
ot Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming. I™
Book No. 6 ot Location Notice Ro*
cords at Page No. 228 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with tbe surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to b®
patented, la bounded as follows:
On the north by the Red OU
Placer Min’ng Claim;
On, the south by Vacant unoccupied
Government land;
On the east by the Wilson No. 3
and Wilson No. 1 Oil Placer Mining
Claims;
On the west by Vacant unoccupied
Government land;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified (hat unless
their claims are duly filed according
to low and the regulations thereun
der. within the time provided by l» w .
with the Register ot the United
States Lint) Office at Lander, Fre
mont County, Wyoming, they will b®
barred hr virtue ot the provisions ot
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT,
Register.
First publication March 15, 19122.
Last publication May 10, 1921'.

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