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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, April 12, 1922, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
g£opqriqht* bq Ko th leer? No -*
CHAPTER I.
Richard Carter had called the place
**Crownlands,” not to please himself,
or even his wife. But It was to his
mother’s newly bom family pride that
the Idea of being the Carters of
Crownlands made its appeal. The es
tate, when he bought it, had belonged
to a Carter, and the tradition was that
two hundred years before it had been
a grant of the first George to the first
of the name in America. Madame
Carter, as the old lady liked to be
called. Immediately adopted the un
known owner into a vague cousinship,
spoke of him as “a kinsman of ours,’*
and proceeded to tell old friends that
Crownlands had always been “in the
family.”
It was a home of creamy brick, co
lonial In design, and set in splendid
lawns and great trees on the bank of
the blue Hudson. White driveways
circled it, great stables and garages
across a curve of green meadows had
their own invisible domain, and on the
shining highway there wis a full mile
of high brick fence, a marching line of
great maples and sycamores, and a
demure lodge beside the mighty* iron
gates.
On one of the wide benches that
were placed here and there on the de
scending terraces, In the late hours of
an exquisite summer afternoon, Isa
belle Carter had seated herself, and
Anthony Pope, her cavalier, had
thrown himself on the steps at her
feet.
She was a woman worthy of the ex
quisite setting, and might well have
turned an older head than that of the
boy beside her. Brunette, with smooth
cheeks deeply touched with rose, black
eyes, and a warmly crimson mouth
that could be at once provocative and
relentless, she glowed like a flower
herself in the sweet and enervating
beat of the summer’s first warm day.
She was the tiniest of women, and the
little foot, that. In Its transparent silk
stocking and buckled slipper, was
close to Anthony’s hand, was like a
child’s.
The man was twice her size, and as
dark as she, earnest, eager, and today
with a troubled expression clouding
his face. It was to banish that look,
If she might, that Isabelle had delib
erately stopped him here.
She had been behaving badly toward
him, and in her rather irresponsible
and shallow' way she was sorry for it.
Isabelle was a famous flirt, her hus-
i -Wf
Isabelle Was a Famous Flirt, Her
Husband Knew It, Everyone Knew
It.
band knew it, everyone knew It.
There was always some man paying
desperate court to her, and always
half-a-dozen other men who were
eager to be In his place. Isabelle
lived for this, went from oiie adven
ture to another with the naive confi
dence of a woman whose husband
smiles upon her playing, and whose
position is impregnable.
But this boy, this Anthony, was dif
ferent. In the first place he w*as
young—but twenty-six. In the second
place he was, or had been, her own
son’s closest friend. Ward Carter was I
twenty-two, and his mother nineteen
years older.
Anthony was young, and he was ab
surd, but he did not know It, and Isa
belle began to feel the difficulty of
keeping the whole world from discov
ering It before he did. He made no se
cret of bls passion. He came straight
♦o her in any company; he never
looked at anybody else. To her own j
daughter Nina, seventeen years old,
his attitude was almost paternal; he
ignored Ward as if their friendship
bad never been.
Isabelle saw that she had made a
mistake. She should have killed this
affair at the very beginning. Tony
was not like the older men, willing to
play the game with just a little scorch
ing of fingers. Appearances meant
nothing to Tony, and she had let the
play go too far now to convince him
that she did not return something of
his feeling.
She looked down at him now, con
tent to be alone with her and at her
feet, and a hundred mixed emotions
stirred her. His feeling for her was
not only pitiable and absurd in him,
but it was rapidly reaching the point
when it would make her absurd and
pitiable, too. Nina, Instinctively
scenting .the affair,, had already ex
pressed herself as “hating that idiot;’’
Ward had scowled, of late, at the mere
mention of Tony’s name. Even her
husband, the patient Richard, seeing
the youth ensconce himself firmly be
side her in the limousine, had had
aside his mild comment: “Is this young
man a fixture in our family, dear?’’
“You should be playing tennis,
Tony,” said Isabelle.
“Tennis!” A look of distaste crossed
Anthony’s face.
“Please-—Cherle!” he begged.
There was a silence brimming with
sweetness and color. Tony laid his
hand against her knee, groped until
her own warm, smooth fingers were in
his own.
“Does Mr. Carter play golf tomor
row?” he asked, presently.
“I suppose so!”
I “And you—what do you do?”
“Oh, I have a full day! People to
lunch, friends of Madame Carter —”
The boy laughed triumphantly.
“I knew you’d say that!” he said.
“Now, I’ll tell you about tomorrow.
You and I are going to slip away, at
about one o’clock, and go off in the
gray car. We’ll go up to—well, some
where, and we’ll have our lunch under
the trees. We’ll be back at about four,
for the tea callers, and they may have
you until I come back for dinner.
After dinner we’ll walk on the terrace
—as we did two wonderful, wonderful
nights ago, and perhaps—” His voice
had fallen to a rich and tender note,
his eyes w’ere rapt. “Perhaps,” he
said, “just before we go In, at the
end of the terrace, you’ll look up at
the stars again—”
“Tony!” Isabelle interrupted, her
face brilliant with color. “My dear
boy—my dear boy, think where this
Is going to end. In all reason —In all
reason—”
“Isabelle, what In God’s name has
reason to do with it!” He knelt be
fore her, and caught her hands, and
Isabelle had a terrified fear that
Ward, or Nina, or any one else, might
start up or down the terrace steps and
see him. “The Instant you realize
what you and I are to each other, my
darling,” he said, “you begin to talk
of reason. Love isn’t reason, Cherle.
It’s the divlnest unreason In the
world I Cherle, there’s never been
another woman for me; there never
will be! I can’t live without you; I
don’t want to! You’re frightened now,
you don’t know how we can manage
it. But I’ll find the way. The only
thing that matters Is that you must
belong to me—you shall belong to me
—as Ito you In every fiber of my be
ing—”
“Tony—for Heaven’s sake—l” Isa
belle was in an agony. Somebody was
approaching. He had gotten to his
feet, and was gloomily staring at the
river, when Nina Carter, followed by
a great white Russian hound, came
flying down the steps.
“Mother —” Nina, a tall, overgrown
girl, with spectacles on her straight |
nose, and straight, Ught-brown hair In
thick braids, stopped short and gave
her mother’s companion a look of
withering distaste. “Mother,” she be
gan again, “aren’t you coming up for
tea 7’
“Ask Betty Allen to pour,” said
Mrs. Carter, regaining her composure
rapidly, and assuming the air of host
ess at once.
“Betty went home for a tub,” Nina
explained. “She’s coming back. But,
Mother,” she added, with a faintly re
proachful and whining intonation,
“really, you ought to be thefre—”
Mrs. Carter knew this as well as
Nina. But she found the child ex
tremely trying in this puritanical
mood. Granting that this affair with
Tony did her, Isabelle, small credit,
at least it was not for Nina to sit In
judgment. Rebellious, Isabelle fondled
the loving nose of the hound with a
small, brown, jeweled hand, and
glanced dubiously at Tony’s uncom
promising back.
“Trot bacx, Nina, love,” said she to
her daughter,- cheerfully, “and ask
Miss Harriet to come out and pour.
I’ll be there directly. We'll come right
up. Run along!”
To Nina, in this Ignomtnous dismis
sal, there was sweet. She adored “Miss
Harriet,” the Miss Field who had
been her governess and her mother’s
secretary for the three happiest years
FWnt’i ■omewhatSSßiS yediig QU
It would be "fun” to hare Miss yield!
pour. Nina leaped obediently up the'
steps, with a flopping of thick braids
and the scrape of sturdy shoes, and
the sweet summer world was in r.llenee
again.
Isabelle sat on. stroking the hound,
her soul filled with perplexity. An
thony's eloquent back gave her sudden
understanding of his fury. “Ah, please.
Tony,” she pleaded, "what can I do?"
“Nothing!” he answered, suddenly
pliant. “Nothing, of course.” And
he turned to her a boyish face stern
with pain. “Os course you can do
nothing, Cherle. I'm not such a—such
a fool —” his voice broke angrily—
“that I can’t see that I Come on. we’ll
go up and have tea—with the Bel
lamys. And I—l’ll be going tonight.
I'll say good-by to you now—and per
haps you’ll be good enough to make
my good-bys to the others— ’■
The youthfulness of It did not rob
It of real dignity. Isabelle, wretched
ly mounting the steps beside him, felt
her heart contract with real pain. He
would go away—it would all be over
and forgotten In a few weeks—and
yet, how she longed to comfort him,
to make him happy again I
She looked obliquely at his set face,
and what she saw there made her
feel ashamed.
On the bright level of the upper ter
race tea was merrily In progress. Miss
Field had duly come down to preside,
and all was well. Isabelle, as she
dropped Into a chair, gave a sigh of re
lief ; everyone was amused and ab
sorbed and happy. Everyone, that Is.
except the magnificent and sharp-eyed
old lady who sat, regally throned,
near her, and favored her Immediately
with a dissatisfied look. Old Madame
Carter had her own good reasons for
being angry, and she never spared any
one available from participation tn her
mood.
She was remarkably handsome, even
at seventy-flve; with a crown of puffed
white hair, gold-rlmmed eye-glasses,
and an erect and finely preserved fig
ure. Her voice was theatrically deep
and clear, and her manner vigorous
and Impressive.
“Well, my dear, your friends were
naturally wondering what Important
matter kept their hostess away from
her guests,” she began. Isabelle
shrugged and smiled carelessly, with
an Indifferent glance at the group.
“Harriet Is managing very nicely,"
she said, contentedly, as Tony, with a
somber face and averted eyes, brought
her her tea.
"So Ward seems to think,” observed
Ward's grandmother with acidity. Isa
belle laughed Indifferently. Her son,
slender and tall, and with something
of her own eagerness and fire In his
sunburned young face, was beside Miss
Field, who talked to him in a quiet
aside while she busied herself with
cups and spoons.
"Perfectly safe there 1" Isabelle
said.
“I should hope so I" old Madame Car
ter remarked, pointedly. “At least It
there’s any of our blood In his veins—
but, of course, he’s all Slocpm. They
used to say of my Aunt Georgina that
she never married because the only
man she ever loved was beneath her
socially—"
Isabelle knew all about Aunt Georg
ina, and she looked wearily away. "The
Bellamys are coming In for awhile,”
she observed, with deliberate Irrelev
ance, “and I hope they’ll bring their
Swami —or whatever he Is, with them.
He must be a queer creature.”
“He’s not a Swami, he's an artist,"
Tony said, drawn Into a casual conver
sation much agulnst his will. “Blon
din —I’ve met him. I can't bear him,
he makes me sick I"
He relapsed Into gloomy silence, and
Isabelle put Into her laugh something
affectionate and soothing.
“He evidently lives by his wits," she
suggested, “which Is something you
have never had to do 1”
Tony scowled again. It was part
of his charm for her that he was the
spoiled darling of fortune. Handsome
and young, and with no family ties to
restrain him, he had recently come
Into his own enormous fortune. His
manner with servants, his ready check
book, his easy French, and his unruf
fled self-confidence In any Imaginable
contingency, coupled with his youth,
had strong attraction for a woman
conscious of the financial restrictions
of her own early years and the limita
tions of her public-school education.
“Why don’t you go to the club and
dress now, and come back and dine
with us?” she said. In an undertone.
“Do you want me?" he asked,
sulkily.
“I’m asking you 1”
For answer he stood up, and smiled
wistfully down upon her, with a hesi
tancy she knew welt how to Interpret
in his eyes. He had been longing so
thirstily for just that permission, and
she bad been yearning so to give it!
Happiness came back Into both their
hearts as he turned to go, and she
gave him just a quick touch of a warm
little hand In farewell.
Other guests had come in, and Miss
Field was extremely busy, and Ward,
helping her officially, was busy, too.
“Fun to have you down here I" he said,
In her ear.
Harriet Field had an aside with a
mold regarding hot water. Then she
gave Ward an Indulgent, an older-sis
terly glance. He was In years almost
twenty-two. but at twenty-seven the
young woman felt him ages her junior.
He was a joyous, Irresponsible boy,
and he and his mother's secretary had
always been good friends since the
day, four years ago now, when the
silent, tpmewhat grave Harriet Field
had first made her appearance In the
family. The young people loved her;
Richard Carter occasionally said to
his wife, "Very clever—very pretty
girl I” which was perhaps as close as
ne ever got to any domestic matter,
and Isabelle confided to her almost all
her duties and cares. Nina, Insatiably
curious, had gathered no more than
that Miss Harriet’s father had been a
college professor of languages, and
that her only relative was a married
sister, Linda, much older, who had
four children,' and lived in New Jer
sey.
She wns a master of the art of keep
ing silent, this young woman, and but
for her beauty she might have been
as Inconspicuous as she sincerely
tried to be. But her simple gowns and
her plainly massed hair only served
to emphasise the extraordinary dis
tinction of her appearance, and her ut
most effort to obliterate herself could
hot quite keep her from notice. Old
Mrs. Carter, who for reasons perfectly
comprehensible in an old lady who
had once been handsome herself, de
tested Harriet, and said to her
duughter-ln-law that In her opinion
there was something queer about the
girl.
She was of that always-arresting
type that combines a warm dusky skin
with blue eyes and fair hair. The
eyes. In her case, were a soft smoky
blue, set in thick and Inky black
lashes, and the hair was brnssy gold,
banded carelessly but trimly about her
rather broad forehead. Her mouth
was wide, deep crimson, thin-lipped;
It was a mouth of secrets and of mys
tery, of character, a mouth that had
known the trembling of pain and grief,
perhaps, but a firm mouth now, and
a beautiful one.
Looking at her, an artist would
have fancied her a bold and charming
and boyish-looking little girl, fifteen
years ago, with that Greek chin and
that tawny mane: would have seen her
sexless and splendid In her early teens,
with a flat breast and an untamed eye.
And a romancer might have wondered
what paths had led her. In the superb
realization of her beautiful woman
hood, at twenty-seven, to this subor
dinate position In the home of a self
made rich man, and this conventional
tea table on a terrace over the Hud
son.
"Nearly half-past five. Nina," she
said, presently. “Go and change and
brush, that’s a darling 1 You look
rather tumbled."
Nina, reaching for a matron, obedi
ently wandered away, and Immediately
the empty chair beside Harriet wax
taken by a newcomer. Richard Carter
himself, the owner of all this smiling
estate, who had come up from the
little launch at the landing, had
changed hastily Into white flannels,
Harriet saw at a glance, and had un
expectedly joined them for tea.
“Tea, Mr. Carter?" Harriet ven
tured.
He was watching his wife with a
sort of Idle Interest. She had to re
peat her Invitation.
“If you please, Mlns Field! Tea
sounded right, somehow, to me today.
It’s been a terrible day!"
“I can imagine It 1” Harriet’s voice
was pleasantly commonplace. But the
moment had Its thrill for her. This
lean, tall, tired man, with his abstract
manner, his perfunctory courtesies, his
nervous, clever hands, loomed in otld'y
heroic proportions In Harriet's life.
His face was keen and somewhat
lined under a smooth crest of slightly
graying hair; he smiled very rarely,
but there was a certain kindliness In
his gray eyes, when Nina or Ward
or his wife turned to him, that Har
riet liked.
For Harriet he had hardly a dozen
words a year. He merely smiled
kindly when she thanked him for the
Christmas gift that bore his un
touched card; If she went to her sis
ter for a day or two, he gave her only
a nod of greeting when she came back.
Now and then he asked with sharp
Interest about Nina’s teeth or his
mother's headache.
But Harriet had known other types
of men, and for his very silences, for
his Indifference, she had begun to ad
mire him long ago. She had not been
born in this atmosphere of pleasure
and ease and riches; she was not en
tirely unfitted to judge a man.
Isabelle was always breezily civil to
her husband; he had long ago van
ished as completely from among the
vital elements of her life as If he were
dead, perhaps more than if he were
dead. She thought—ls she thought
about him at all—that he never saw
her little affairs; she supposed him
perfectly satisfied with his home and
children and club and business, and
Incidentally with his beautiful figure
head of a wife. They had quarreled
distressingly, several years ago, when
he had bored her with references to
her “duty," and her influence over
Nina, and her obligations to her true
self. But that had all stopped long
since, and now Isabelle was free to
sleep lute, to dress at leisure, to make
what engagements she pleased, to see
the persons who Interested her. Rich
ard never Interfered; never was there
u more perfectly discreet and gener
ous husband. Half the women Isabelle
knew were attempting to live exactly
as she did, to cultivate “suitors," aud
drift about in an atmosphere of new
gowns and adulation and orchids and
softly lighted drawing rooms, and In
cessant playing with fire; It was the
accepted thing. In Isabelle's circle,
and that .she was more successful In
It than other women was not at all
to her discredit
CHAPTER 11.
Madame Carter, gathering her drap
eries about her, was one of the first
to leave the terrace. Dressing for
dinner was a slow and serious busi
ness for her. She gave Harriet a cold,
appraising glance as she passed her;
Richard Carter had risen to escort his
mother, but she delayed him for a mo
ment.
“Miss Nina gons in, Miss Field?"
Harriet whose manner with all old
persous was the essence of scrupulous
formality, rose at once to her feet
“Nina has gone to change her dress,
Madame Carter."
"She took it upon herself to ask
you to help us out Ahls afternoon?"
the old lady added, with the sort of
gracious cruelty of which she was mis
tress. Richard Carter gave his daugh
ter’s companion a look that asked In
dulgence.
(To be Continued)
The rope industry Is said to be the
oldest in the world.
Serial No. C1374S
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin Oil and Gas Com
pany for a Un'ted States Patent to
the Wilson No. 2 OH Placer Min
ing Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice Is hereby given that in
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon
Basin Oil and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O'Leary, Its duly authorized
agent and attorney In fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as the
■Wilson No. 2 011 Placer Mining
Claim,” situate, lying and being In
Park County, Wyoming, has made ap
plication to the United States for a
patent for said oil placer mining
Claim, which is more particularly de
scribed as follows:
The North Half of the Northeast
Quarter (N%NEU) off Section Six
(6); and the Northwest Quarter of
the Northwest Quarter (NW%NW%)
of Section Five (6), Township Fifty
(50) North of Range One Hundred
(100) West of the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Wilson No. 2 OH Placer Mining Claim
is of record in the office of the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Officio Register of
Deeds tn and for Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, in
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 247 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought, to be
patented. Is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Purple and
McMahan Oil Placer Mining Claims;
On the south by the Wilson No. 1
OH Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Anderson OH
OH Placer Mining Claim:
On the east by the Wilson No. 3 Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for. are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law,
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fro
mont County, Wyoming, they will bo
barred by virtue of the provisions of
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT,
Register.
First publication March 29
Last publication May 24th—1922
Serial No. 013746
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin Oil and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the Polly Oil Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander,- Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice is hereby given that in
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned. The Oregon
Basin Oil and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne, Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as the
“Polly Oil Placer Mining Claim,"
situate, lying and being In Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which is
more particularly described as fol
lows:
The Southwest Quarter (SW%) of
Section Five (5), Township Fifty
one (51) North of Range One Hun
dred (100) West of the 6th P. M.
The notice of .location of said
Polly OH Placer Mining Claim
is of record in the office of the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Offlclo Register of
Deeds In and for Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, in
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords nt Page No. 262 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
patented, Is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Sidney OH
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Katie OH
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Pauline Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Nicholas OH
Placer Mining Claim;
Any and all persons clalrrlng ad
versely to the said ell placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the, time provided by law,
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fre-
WEDNEBDAY, A2PRIL 12, 192?
mont County, Wyoming, they will bo
barred by virtue of the provisions or
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT,
Register.
First publication March 15, 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
Serial No. 013743
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin OU and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the Red OU Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office.
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1923
Notice is hereby given that In
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 o f
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon
Basin OH and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenue. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil .
placer mining ground known as the
“ Red OH Placer Mining Claim,"
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty. Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which I»
more particularly described as fol
lows:
Lots Three and Four (3 & 4) anti
the East Half of the Southwest
Quarter (EHSW>4) of Section Thir
ty-one (31), Township Fifty-one (51>
North of Range One Hundred (100>
West of the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Red OH Placer Mining Claim.
! is of record In the office of the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Offlclo Register of
' Deeds In and for Park County, State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, In
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 231 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
patented, is bounded as foUows:
On the north by the Josephine OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Anderson OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Purple OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Elizabeth Oil
Placer Mining Claim and vacant un
occupied Government land;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for. are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law.
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fre
mont County. Wyoming, they will be
barred by virtue of the provisions t
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT.
Register
First publication March 15. 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
Serial No. 013744
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin OH and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the Anderson Oil Placer Mining Claim.
United States Land Office.
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16. 1922
Notice is hereby given that In
pursuance of Chapter 6, Title 32 of v
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, Tho Oregon
Basin OH and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with Its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in tact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as the
“Anderson OU Placer Mining Claim."
situate, lying and being In Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which Is
more particularly described as fol
lows:
Lots Three. Four and Five (3, &
5) and the Southeast Quarter of Ike
Northwest Quarter (SEI4NWI4) of
Section Six (6), Township Fifty (50)
North of Range One Hundred (100>
West of tho 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Anderson OH Placer Mining Claim
is of record In the office of the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Offlclo Register nt
Deeds in and for Park County. State
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming. In
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Ita" ,
cords at Page No. 228 thereof. '
That said claim and promises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to he
patented, 1s bounded as follows:
On the north by the Red Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by Vacant unoccupied
Government land;
On the east by the Wilson No. -
and Wilson No. 1 OH Placer Mining
Claims; Sdjjiib,,
On tho west by Vacant unoccupied
Government land; ,
Any and all persons claiming ml
verseiy to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part
of, so above described and appm'<
for, are hereby notified that union*
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by !»*’ .
with tho Register of the Unite
States Land Office at Lander, F re
mont County, Wyoming, they will >
barred by virtue of tho provisions o
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT.
Register-
First publication March 15, 1# 22 -
Last publication May 10, 1922.

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