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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, May 03, 1922, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
HARRIET
and the
PIPER
Kathleen Norris
Illustration} by
Irwin Myers
niimiihiiiiliiiiiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiihiir;
Copyright by Kathleen Norrta
SYNOPSIS.
CHAPTER I.—Harriet Field, twenty
eight years old and beautiful, is the so
cial secretary of the flirtatious Mrs. Isa
belle Carter, at ••Crownlands.” Richard
Carter’s home, and governess of 17-year
old Nina Carter. Ward, twenty-four years
old and impressionable, fancies himself in
love with his mother’s attractive secre
tary. Mrs. Ctt ter’s latest ”attalr” is
with young Anthony Pope, and the youth
Is taking it very seriously.
CHAPTER ll.—Presiding over the tea
cups this summer afternoon, Harriet is
profoundly disturbed by the arrival of a
visitor. Royal Blondin. Next day, at a
tea party in the city, Blondin makes him
self agreeable to Nina, and leaves a deep
impression on the unsophisticated girl.
CHAPTER 111. Harriet’s agitation
over the appearance of Blondin at
“Crownlands” is explained by the fact
that he bad been a disturbing element in
her life ten years before, and she fears
him. The man 1g an avowed adventurer,
living on the gullibility of the idle rich.
He frankly announces to Harriet his in
tention of marrying Nina, who, as the
daughter of the wealthy Richard Carter,
Is a highly desirable “catch,” and urges
her to aid him. She is In a sense in his
power, and after pleading with him to
abandon his scheme agrees to follow a
policy of neutrality.
Chapter 4—Continued
Linda’s rocker stopped as if by
shock. There was an electric silence.
When she spoke again it was with
awe and incredulity and something
like terror in her tone.
“Royal Blondin I He’s In England !”
“He was,” Harriet said, dryly. “He’s
been in New York for two years now.”
Linda shuddered.
“I know —I remember!” she said In
a whisper. And she added fervently,
"I hoped he was dead!”
“So did I!” Harriet said, simply.
"Our meeting was entirely accidental.
He had no idea of finding me; was
as surprised as I was.” She stopped
abruptly, musing on some unpalat
able thought. “You wouldn’t know
him, Linda. He Is a perfect freak.
New thought, and poetry, and the oc
cult, and Tagore and the Russian
novelists, and the Russian music; he
lectures about them and he has been
extremely successful 1 He wears pon
gee coats and red ties, and has his
hair long, and —well, you never saw
women act so about anything or any
body! He’s having dinner with the
Carters tonight.” To this Linda could
only ejaculate an amazed:
“Royal Blondin!” And as Harriet
merely nodded, in the gloom, she .add
ed, vigorously, “Why, he hadn’t a
penny! He was always an Idiot—he
didn’t have enough to eat ten years
ago!”
“Well, he has enough to eat now!
Ward told me that he gets three hun
dred dollars for his drawing-room
talks —his ‘lnterpretive musings,' he
called them.”
“Well, that —” Mrs. Davenport was
still dazed with astonishment and in
dignation. “That really—” she be
gan, and stopped, shaking her head.
And Suddenly the Bright Head Was
In Linda’s Lap and She Was Sobbing j
Bitterly.
“Tell me everything you said I” she |
commanded.
“I will 1” Harriet’s voice fell flatly.
“I came home to talk it over with
you.” Rut it was fully five minutes
later that she began the inevitable
confidences. “We talked—Roy and
I —” she said, briefly. “He doesn’t
belong in my life, now, any more than
I do in his! We simply agreed to a
sort of mutual minding of our own !
business.” r
“Thank God 1” Mrs. Davenport said, I
fervently. “He —lie doesn’t wont to— !
he doesn’t still feel —he won’t worry
you, then?” she asked somewhat diffi
dently. Harriet’s laugh had an un
pleasant edge.
“He Is after bigger game than I
am. n^w!” she said.
“The brute!” her sister commented
In a whisper, _ “It—it is all right,
then?” she asked, a little timidly.
“All right!” Harriet echoed, bitter
ly. “I haven’t drawn a happy breath
since I saw him! All that time came
up again, as fresh as if It were yes
terday—except that I have climbed
a little way, Linda ; I was happy—l
was busy and useful —and I had —T
had my self-respect!”
And suddenly the bright head was
I in Linda’s lap, and she was sobbing
j bitterly. Linda, with a great ache in
’ her heart, circled her arms, mother
i fashion, as she had circled them a
hundred times, about her little sister.
CHAPTER V.
Harriet slept In the room with Julia
-and Josephine that night, or rather
tossed and lay wakeful there.’ At
about two o’clock the wind streamed
mercifully in, hot and thick, but
prophetic of rain, and Harriet, wan
dering about to make windows fast,
encountered Linda, on the same er
rand. When the worst of the crack
ling and flashing was over, the girl
glanced at her watch. Three o’clock,
but she could sleep now. She sank
deeply into dreams, not to stir until
Linda’s alarm clock, hastily smoth
i cred, thrilled at seven, and the small
I girls rose with cheerful noise, to let
I streams of hot sunshine upon h*»r face.
Immediately after breakfast the
two small girls attacked their Satur
day morning’s work with a philosophic
vigor that rather touched their aunt,
had hurried away after his hasty
meal; the boys were turned out Into
the backyard, which Pip was expected
to rake while he watched his small
brother.
Harriet’s heart ached deeply for
them all as she watched the Jersey
marshes from the car window a few
hours later. Josephine was to be a
stenographer when she finished high
school, and little Julia had expressed
an angelic ambition to teach a kinder- j
garten class some day. Nina, at their '
ages, had her pony, her finishing '
school, her little silk stockings, and
her monogrammed Ivory toilet set,
her trip to England and France and
Italy with her mother and brother
and grandmother.
Suppose >hat she. Harriet, was right
in suspecting that Ward’s feeling was
more than the passing gallantry of
a light-hearted boy? It would be a
nine-days’ wonder, his marriage at
twenty-two with his mother’s secre
tary, more than four years his senior.
But after that? After that there
would be nothing to say or do. Young
Mr. and Mrs. Ward Carter would es
tablish themselves comfortably, and
the elder Carters would visit them;
Isabelle absorbed as usual in her own
mysterious thoughts, and Richard
Carter —
Harriet’s thoughts, none too com
fortable up to this point, stopped here,
and she flushed. She would not enjoy
telling Richard that she was to marry
his son. Those keen eyes would rend
her through and through, and while
her father-in-law might Jove her. and
see her beauty and charm with all
the rest of the world, Harriet knew
that she must begin an actual cam
paign for his esteem on her wedding
day. The prospect had an unexpect
ed piquancy. She had little fear of
Its outcome. She would make Ward
Carter a wife for whom his father
must come to feel genuine gratitude
and devotion. There would be chil
dren, there would be hospitality and
music and a garden. And Ward
should seriously settle down to his
business, whatever it might be, and
show himself a worthy son of his
clever father.'
“Why not —why not?” Harriet asked
herself, as she reached Madame Car
ter’s pretentious apartment house, and
was whisked upstairs. She was to
meet Nina here, and she glanced about
for the big limousine at the curb, as an
indication that the old lady might be
ready to accompany them, back to
Crownlands. But there was no car in
sight. The maid’s first statement was
that Miss Carter had gone home with
her brother, and then Madame Carter
came magnificently into the room.
“Well, our bird has flown!” said the
old lady. Harriet could see that she
was pleased about something.
“Gone home with Ward?” Harriet
asked. Madame Carter never shook
hands with her; there was conscious
superiority in the little omission. She
sank into a chair, and Harriet sat
down.
“Ward and his friend, this Mr. Blon
din,” Madame Carter said. “A very
interesting—a most unusual man. A
very good family, too-—excellent old
family. Yes. Nina assured us that she
had to wait and go home with her
Daddy, but that —” Madame Carter
gave Harriet a deeply significant smile
—“but that didn’t seem to please
Somebody very much!” she added. “So
I told Nina I thought Granny would be
able to make it all right with Daddy,
and off the young people went.”
She rocked, with a benignly tri
umphant expression, and a complacent
rustle of silken skirts. Harriet, be
neath an automatic smile, hid a trou
bled heart. Royal was losing no time,
Ward his Innocent Instrument, and this
fatuous old lady of course playing his
game for him I
Harriet saw that she was pleased
and flattered by an older man’s appar
ent admiration of Nina; and that she
would further the girl’s first definite
affair In every way that lay in her
power. It was maddening; it was ex
asperating beyond words. An honest
warning would have merely flattered
her with its implication of her iin|X>r
tance; ah, no, Isabelle and Harriet
might try to hold the child back —but
Granny knew girl nature better than
either of them!
“Well, then, I must follow them
home,” Harriet said, pleasantly. "You
dog’t come back tonight?” _ ...
To this Madame Carter very point
edly made no answer; her plans were
not Miss Field’s business.
“The child is growing up!” the old
Indy said, smiling at some thought.
“Well, we must look for love affairs
now!”
Harriet felt that there was small
profit in following this line of conver-
I nation. She glanced at her twisted
wrist.
“I think I will make that two o’clock
train, Madame Carter, unless there is
wF' 1 ' ' Jflffl' -- " ’
“A Very Interesting—A Most Unusual
Man—A Very Good Family, Too—
Excellent Old Family.”
some errand I might do for you?” she
said respectfully.
This courtesy, from a beautiful
young woman to an old one, always an
tagonized Madame Carter. Harriet
knew that she was casting about for
some honeyed and venomous farewell,
when the muffled thrill of the bell
came to them, and the footsteps of
Ella were heard. Immediately after
ward Richard Carter came quickly in.
He met Harriet at the door.
“How are you, Miss Field? Tell
Nina to hurry; I’ve got about five min
utes!” he said, pleasantly.
"Don’t keep Miss Field; she is mak
ing her train!” said his mother, com
ing forward under full sail, and laying
both hands about his. “I’ll explain
about Nina.”
Richard Carter gave his mother the
peculiarly warm smile that was espe
cially her own.
“Went on with Ward, eh?” he said,
in his hearty voice. “That’s all right,
then. Oh, Miss Field!“ he called, after
Harriet’s discreetly retreating back,
“the car’s downstairs. Wait for me
there; I’ll run you home in half the
time the train takes. I’m playing In
the tennis finals. Mother —”
Harriet, turning for just a nod and
smile, heard no more. But as she en
tered the lift, the girl said to herself,
with a passionate sort of gratitude:
“Oh, I like you! You’re the only genur
ine and unselfish and kind-hearted one
in the whole crowd I”
She went down to the street, and
saw the small car waiting. He was
driving himself today. With a great
sense of comfort and relaxation Har
riet got into it. and was comfortably
established, and tucked in snugly,
when Richard came down. He smiled
at seeing her, got into his own seat;
the machine slipped smoothly into mo
tion, the hot and sordid streets began
to glide by.
“Ever think how illuminating It
would be. Miss Field, if we kept a list
of the things that are worrying us
sick, and read ’em over a few weeks
later?”
“I suppose so!” the girl said,a little
surprised, and yet with fervor. “We’d
have a fresh bunch then, and be wor
rying away just as hard!”
The spontaneous response in her
tone made Richard Carter laugh.
Harriet was content to enjoy this
restful interval between the hurry and
crowding of Linda’s house and the
currents and cross-currents that she
must encounter at Crownlands. She
watched the green country go by, the
trees silent and heavy with their rich
foliage, the villages blazing with the
last June roses.
They flew by the great gates of the
country club, and turned in past
Crownlands lodge, and Harriet got out
at the steps, and turned her happy,
flushed face toward the man to thank
him. Whatever she saw in his face as
he smiled and nodded at her pleased
her, for she went upstairs saying again
to herself, “Oh, you’re real —you’re
honest —I like you !‘
It was delightful to get back into
the familiar atmosphere, to catch the
fragrance of flowers in the orderly
gloom downstairs, to take off her hat
and her hot, dusty clothing, and have
a leisurely hot bath; to put on fresh
and fragrant summer wear, and to go
downstairs presently, rejoicing in be
ing young and comfortable, and tre
mendously interested In life. The sig
nificance of Richard Carter’s parting
look, Its honest admiration and friend
liness, augmented by her own glance
at a chance mirror on her way up
stairs, stayed with her pleasantly.
At one end of the terrace there was
an awning whose shade fell upon the
brick flooring and the jars of bloom;
and this afternoon it also shaded Isa
belle, in a basket chair, and the big
hound, and Tony Pope. Harriet cast
them a passing glance, and wondered
a little in her heart. The boy was
handsome, and fascinating, and rich,
but it was Just a little unusual to have
Isabelle so openly interested in any
one. . •
Undefined and vague, this was still
somewhere in the background of her
thoughts as she returned to Crown
lands, and when she met Ward Car
ter, wrestling with the engine of his
own rather disreputable racing car.
out in one of the clean, graveled
spaces near the garage.
Harriet felt a little quickening of
her pulses as she saw him. There was
no mistaking the pleasure in his eyes
as she came close.
“Spark plugs?” she asked, with the
sympathy of one to whom the peculi
arities of the car were familiar.
“She’s fixed now; I’ve just cleaned
’em,” Ward announced, flinging away
his cigarette and straightening his
back. “She’ll go like a bird, now. Say,
get in and try her, will you?” he asked,
eagerly. "Come on—come on, be a
sport!” But perhaps he was as much
surprised as delighted when she very
simply stepped into the low front seat.
He gave her more than one sidewise
glance as they* went dipping smoothly
up and down the green lanes, and said
to himself, “Gosh—when she crinkles
those blue eyes of hers, and her mouth
sort of twitches as if she wanted to
laugh, she is a beauty—that’s what she
Is!"
About a week inter they met for a
few moments in this very side garden.
It was early evening, and twilight and
moonlight were mingled over the silent
roses, and the trimmed turf, and the
low brick walls.
They came straight toward each
other, and stood very close together,
and he took both of Harriet’s hands.
“Now, what Is it —what is it?” the
man said, quickly. “I’ve been waiting
long enough. I can’t stand It any
longer! I can’t go away tomorrow,
perhaps for two weeks, and not
know I”
“Ward,” the girl faltered, lifting an
exquisite face that wore, even in the
faint moonshine, a troubled and In
tense expression, “can’t we let It all
wait until you get back?”
“Why, Harriet,” and his arm went
about her shoulders, and he bent his
face over hers. “Harriet, why not let
me go happy?” he pleaded.
“You’ll see a dozen younger girls at
ths Bellamys’ camp,” Harriet rea
soned, “girls with whom it would be
infinitely more suitable—”
“Please!” be interrupted, patiently.
And almost touching her warm, smooth
cheek with his own, and coming so
close that to raise her beautiful eyes
was to find his only a few inches away,
he added, fervently, “You love me and
I love you—isn’t that all that mat
ters?”
Did she love him? Harriet hoped,
when she reviewed it all In the rest
less, tossing hours of the night,that she
had thought, in that moment, that she
did. It was wonderful to feel that
strong, eager arm about her, there was
a sweet and heady intoxication in his
passion, even if It did not awaken an
answering passion In return. Under
all her reasoning and counter-reason
ing in the night there crept the knowl
edge that she had known that this was
coming, had known that only a few
days of encouraging friendliness, only
a few appealing glances from uplifted
blue eyes, and a few casual touches of
a smooth brown, hand must bring this
hour upon her. And back of this hour,
and of a man’s joy In winning the
woman he loved, she had seen the hazy
future of prosperity and beauty and
ease, the gowns and cars and homes,
the position of young Mrs. Ward Car
ter.
She had let him turn her face up, in
the strengthening moonlight, and kiss
her hungrily upon the lips, and she
had sent him in to his dinner half-wild
with the joy of knowing himself be
loved. Harriet had gone in, too, shaken
and half-frightened, and with his last
whispered prophecy ringing in her
ears:
"Wait a year—rot I I’ll go to the
Bellamys’, because I promised to, but
the day I come back, and that’s two
weeks from today, we’ll tell everyone,
and this time next year you will (pive
been my wife for six months!”
CHAPTER VI.
A most opportune lull followed,
when Harriet Field had time to collect
her thoughts, and get a true perspec
tive upon the events of the past week.
Nina was leaving for a visit to Amy
Hawkes, at the extremely dull and en
tirely safe Hawkes mansion, where
four unmarried daughters constituted
a chaperonage beyond all criticism.
Isabelle Carter was giving and attend
ing the usual luncheons and dinners,
her husband absorbed in an especially
important business deal that kept him
alternate nights in the city. The house
was quiet, the domestic machinery
running smoothly, the weather hot,
sulphurous and enervating.
She dined as usual alone, that eve
ning, and was surprised, at about eight
o'clock, to receive the demure notifica
tion from Rosa that Mrs. Carter would
like to see her. With hardly an in
stant's delay she went downstairs.
On the terrace outside the drawing
room windows they were at a card ta
ble: Richard, looking tired and hot in
rumpled white, Isabelle exquisite in
silver lace, and young Anthony Pope.
Near by, Madame Carter majestically
fingered some illustrated magazines.
It appeared that they wanted bridge;
it was too hot to eat, too hot to dance
at the club, too hot —said Isabelle
pathetically—to live I
Obligingly, Harriet took her place,
cut for the deal. But her eyes had not
fallen upon the group before she
sensed that something was wrong, ahd
she .iiad a moment's flutter of the tatart
for fear some one suspected her, that
she was under surveillance. Had
Royal—had Ward —
She turned a card, tooh| the deal,
found Anthony Pope her partner, and
entered into the game with spirit.
Richard's first words to her were reas-
suring ; if there was constrain! here,
she was not involved in IL
“No trump—says little Miss Field.
Weil, that doesn’t seem to frighten me.
Two spades.”
“I think we might try three dia
monds, Miss Field,” Anothony sold,
gravely and pleasantly, and Harriet,
felt herself acquitted of any apprehen
sion in that direction as well. It only
remained for Isabelle to show friend
liness.
“Du hast dlamonten and perlen,
you two. I can see that I You're
down, Harriet!” Mrs. Carter said,-
thoughtfully. Harriet began thorough
ly to enjoy herself. If they were all
furious, at least it wns not with her.
She speculated, as she gathered in
her tricks. Was It conceivable that
Richard did not enjoy the discovery
of the tete-a-tete dinner? But Isabelle
had often been equally Indiscreet, and
he had never seemed to resent it be
fore. Harriet knew that Isabelle was
111 at ease; she suspected that Tony
was furtmiß. The old lady was ob
viously quivering with baffled inter
est and curiosity.
After three rubbers the game ended
suddenly; Richard said he had some
letters to write, and was keeping Fox
waiting in the libraryAnthony scrib
bled a check, said brief and unfriend
ly good-nights; Isabelle merely raised
passionate dark eyes to his.. She was
languidly gathering In her spoils
when the lights of his car flashed yel
low on the drive and he was gone.
Immediately afterward Richard
Carter said gnod-nlght to his mother
and wife, and went In to his study.
Madame Carter followed him in, and
went upstairs, but Isabelle sat on
moodily shuffling and reshuffling the
cards, in the bright soft light of the
terrace lamps.
“Wait a minute. Harriet,” she said,
briefly, and Harriet obediently loitered.
But Isabelle seemed to have nothing
to say. Her eyes were on the cards,
her beautiful breast, exposed in the
■ Ifwi
-Walt • Minute, Harriet," She Bald,
Briefly, and Harriet Obediently
Lettered.
low-cut sliver gown, rose and fell
stormlly, and Harriet saw that she was
biting her full under Up, as If anger
seethed stronsr within her.
(To be Continued)
Serial No. 013746
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin Oil and Gas Com
pany for a United Statea Patent to
the Polly OU Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 1922
Notice Is hereby given that In
pursuance ot Chapter 6, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes ot the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon
Basin Oil and Oas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws ot the state ot Wyoming,
with its ■ principal office and place ot
business at Cheyenne, Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres ot oil
placer mining ground known as the
“Polly Oil Placer Mining Claim,”
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which is
more particularly described as fol
lows:
The Southwest Quarter (BW%) of
Section Five (6), Township Fifty
one (51) North ot Range One Hun
dred (100) West of the 6th P. M.
The notice ot location ot situ
Polly OU Placer Mining Claim
Is ot record tn the office ot the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Officio Register ot
Deeds in and for Park County, State
ot Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, in
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 262 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to be
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Sidney OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Katie Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Pauline OU
Placer Mining Claim;
On the west by the Nicholas Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
Any and all persons cluin’lng ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law,
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fre-
WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 192»
mont County. Wyoming, they will b»
barred by virtue of the provisions off
said statutes. .
IRVING W. WRIGHT,
Register.
First publication March 15, 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
Serial No. 013743
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin OH and Gas Com.
pany for a United States Patent to
the Red OH Placer Mining Claim-
United Statea Land Office,
Lander, Wyoming,
February 16, 192 S
Notice is hereby given that ln>
pursuance of Chapter S, Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes of the United
States, the undersigned, The Oregon*
Basin OU and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state of Wyoming,
with its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne. W’yomlng, by-
Wilfrid O'Leary, its duly authorised:
agent and attorney in fact, claiming,
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as th®
“Rod OU Placer Mining Claim,”
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States for a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which I®
more particularly described as fol
lows:
Lots 'Three and Four (3 & 4) and
the East Halt ot the Southwest
Quarter (EHSW\4) ot Section Thir
ty-one (31), Township Fifty-one (51>
North of Range One Hundred (100>
West of the 6tb P. M.
The notice of location of said
Red OU Placer Mining Claim*
Is ot record in the office ot the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Officio Register of
Deeds in and for Park County. Stat®
of Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, Im
Book No. 6 ot Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 231 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to b®
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Josephine Oft
Placer Mining Claim;
On the south by the Anderson Oft
Placer Mining Claim;
On the east by the Purple 019
Placer Mi .>g Claim;
On the west by the Elizabeth Oil
Placer Mining Claim and vacant un
occupied Government land;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that nnles®
their claims are duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der, within the time provided by law.
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Lander, Fre
mont County, Wyoming, they will b®
barred by virtue ot the provisions off
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT.
Register.
First publication March 15, 1932.
Last publication May 10, 1922.
• »
Serial No. 013744
NOTICE OF THE APPLICATION
of the Oregon Basin OU and Gas Com
pany for a United States Patent to
the iAnderaon OH Placer Mining Claim
United States Land Office,
Lender, Wyoming.
February 16. 192»
Notice is hereby given that In
pursuance ot Chapter 6. Title 32 of
the Revised Statutes ot the United
States, the undersigned. The Oregon
Basin Oil and Gas Company, a cor
poration oganized and existing under
the laws of the state ot Wyoming,
with Its principal office and place of
business at Cheyenne. Wyoming, by
Wilfrid O’Leary, its duly authorized
agent and attorney in fact, claiming
one quarter section or 160 acres of oil
placer mining ground known as th®
“Anderson OU Placer Mining Claim,”
situate, lying and being in Park Coun
ty, Wyoming, has made application to
the United States tor a patent for
said oil placer mining claim, which I®
more particularly described as fol
lows:
Lots Three, Four and Five (3, 4 &
5) and the Southeast Quarter ot th®
Northwest Quarter (SE%NWI4) of
Section Six (6), Township Fifty (50>
North of Rango One Hundred (100>
West ot the 6th P. M.
The notice of location of said
Anderson OU Placer Mining Clalns
is of record in the office ot the Coun
ty Clerk and Ex-Officio Register of
Deeds in and tor Park County, Stat®
ot Wyoming, at Cody, Wyoming, its
Book No. 6 of Location Notice Re
cords at Page No. 228 thereof.
That said claim and premises, to
gether with the surface ground there
in contained and hereby sought to b®
patented, is bounded as follows:
On the north by the Red Oil
Placer Mining Claim;
On. the south by Vacant unoccupied
Government land;
On the east by the Wilson No. 2
and Wilson No. 1 011 Placer Mining
Claims;
On the west by Vacant unoccupied
Government land;
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely to the said oil placer mining
claim and premises or any part there
of, so above described and applied
for, are hereby notified that unless
their claims uro duly filed according
to law and the regulations thereun
der. within the time provided by law.
with the Register of the United
States Land Office at Landor, Fre
mont County, Wyoming, they will b®
barred by virtue ot the provisions of
said statutes.
IRVING W. WRIGHT,
Register.
First publication March 15, 1922.
Last publication May 10, 1922.

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