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The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, July 05, 1922, Image 7

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 1922.
M. CHAMBERLIN
DENTIST
HOTEL CHAMBERLIN
Cody, Wyoming
ihe Mint Case
We Um the Celebrated
CORONA BLEND COFFEE
Made in Electric Percolator
TABLES FOR LADIES
Soft Drinks, Smokes, and
Good Candies In
Cm in sctioil
We serve Eastern corn-fed
Bee#—Steaks a. Specialty
Home Made Chile
Everything Good to Eat
- ■ ■'■■.Ta-ST-SFJ.T-.T,-,,- -,'iAMl ■' II -a Ml 1
f ■■■■^***■»»■■■a,,|
DWIGHT E. HOLLISTER
Attorney-at-Law
Cody, Wyoming
Pioneer Bldg. Phone 98
----------
Howerton & Scholes
General Contracting
Mill and Cabinet Work
Estimates Furnished
. Fire Wood r
MAKE EVERY HOUR
A HAPPY HOUR!
Pool Billiards
Cards Bowling
LUNCH COUNTER
With Blanche Gokel firin'
up the eats
LOVE’S PLACE
jl " 8
Dave Shelley
Saddles
COW BOY BOOTS
Hyer, Justin and Teitxel
on Hand
Chapa, Bits and Spurs
Tourists Outfits 'r
b~ fr. =W
SI,OOO Reward
will be paid for information lead
ing to the arrest and conviction
of any person or persons killing
or stealing stock belonging to
W. R. COE
Cody, Wyoming
White Lunch
Open Again and
Doing Business
BETTER THAN EVER!
Try a Cup of Our Coffee
With Pure Cream
—HOME MADE PIES—
Mike Miller, nop
AMERICAN
eLEGSON*
(Copy for This Depnrtr.'ent Supplied by
the American Legion Few Service.)
SWAM MEUSE UNDER FIRE
Sergt. M. Waldo Hatler of Joplin, Mo.,
Wears Medals for World War
Bravery.
In the fighting in France Sergt. M.
»Valdo Hatler of Joplin, Mo., swam the
Meuse river under
fire after a com
rade had perished
In the attempt,
‘anded within the
German lines and
explored their po
sitions thoroughly
and swam back
across the river
with information
of great value to
the American
command. For
this he has re-
ceived the croce di guerra of Italy, the
equivalent of the French croix de
guerre.
Hatler met Gen. Armando Diaz,
commander In chief of the Italian
armies In the World war, at the third
national convention of the American
Legion in Kansas City. After this
meeting the Italian decoration was
presented at a special ceremony in
Joplin. The Missourian also wears
the American Medal of Honor and the
French croix de guerre.
V. P. OF FORTY AND EIGHT
C. E. Cronkite of Los Angeles Is
Second in Command of Legion
Roughhouse Club.
“Sous Clief de Chemln de Fer Na
tionale des 40 Hommes et Huit
Chevaux.” This
means in Eng
-11 sh, “National
Assistant Rail
way Station
Agent of the 40
Men and Eight
Horses.” But in
A. E. F. patois It
stands for vice
president of the
Forty and Eight,
the Legion’s
Roughbouse club,
named after the
ittle French boxcars built to carry
‘4O men or eight horses.’’
This imposing title is borne by C.
E. Cronkite of Los Angeles, Cal., for
merly first lieutenant in the Three
Hundred and Twenty-second field
signal battalion.
‘QUEEN OF THE CANAL ZONE”
disa Viola Bissell Wins Contest Spon
sored by American Legion
Department of Panama.
The “Queen of the Canal Zone”
ihs been chosen through an election
♦ A
»
sponsored by the
American Legion,
department o f
Panama. The
contest was won
by Miss Viola
Bissell with 1,-
807,800 votes. Ac
cording to her
enthusiast 1 c
“subjects’’ she Is
of the true Amer
ican type, tall,
blonde and ath
letic. The Pana-
Gians declare her famous smile
would win in any contest over any of
the beauties of America or Europe.
Slightly Deficient.
Here’s one that has leaked out of
in O. T. C. after a couple of years
or so:
A young man, a good soldier, but
sadly lacking In book-larnin', was up
for a commission. He staggerod
through part of the examination to
the Increasing bedevilment of tRe offi
cers in charge, but when it came to
geographical questions his ignorance
was limitless. Finally one of the offi
cers, after listening to a piece of as
tounding misinformation, jumped to
his feet and thundered:
“My sainted aunt’s black cat! Here
you are—say you want to defend your
country—and, by the whiskers of a
ring-toed monkey, you don’t even
know where it 111“ —American Legion
Weekly.
Middle West National Cemetery.
On the prairies of the Platte river in
Nebraska is located the only national
cemetery In the Middle West —that of
Fort McPherson. Here under the cot
tonwoods and evergreens of the plains
lie the dead of the American wars of
the west. Recently 15 of the World
war dead from France have been bur
led the™ by Fort McPherson post of
the American Legion. On 361 of the
earlier grave markers Is the single
word, “Unknown.’’
“We Alm to Please.”
Convict No. 711—1 hear Bill the
Mugg is out again and that he's the
most popular hold-up guy In Cbl
cago.
Convict 117—|Yeah. He always gives
the victims hack cur Jure, so now lie
gets the cream of the trade. Amerl
| tan Legion Weekly.
IMPORTANCE AND IMPROVEMENT
OF VARIOUS NATIVE NUT TREES
—_ —r - ■ ... ; .
Second-Growth Black Walnut Trace, Well Spaced to Permit Nut Produo
tion.
(Prep&red by the United States Department
of Agriculture.)
Native nut trees, such as the black
walnut and members of the hickory
group Including the pecan, have a po
tential value not generally realized.
Aside from the well-known value of
the timber of the walnut in the mak
ing of furniture, gun-stocks, and air
plane propellers, and of the white
hickories in the manufacture of auto
mobile wheels, tool handles, and many
other articles, and even of pecan wood
In Its variety of uses, particularly for
harness hames, these trees, when
rightly selected and placed, form most
attractive ornamentals. But, in addi
tion to these uses, which alone are of
enough importance to justify the care
ful preservation of existing trees and
the planting of others, they have an
economic value in the nuts produced.
These native nuts, eyen though un
cultivated and unimproved, and, per
haps, inferior in shell thickness and
cracking quality, are preferred by
many to any of the cultivated kinds
from Europe and Asitn
Nut Crop Adds To Income.
On many American farms by-prod
ucts or small crops make Important
ddltions to the income, and in many
localities nut trees planted about the
farm buildings, along the highways, or
In other unoccupied spaces, or old
trees that have been left in the clear
ing away of the original forest, are
depended upon to add noticeably to
the bunk account. Forward-looking
fanners want to make their trees pro
duce the best nuts and In the greatest
possible quantity.
First of all, every tree intended to
bear nuts In quantity needs ample
space, 60 feet being none too great an
Interval between trees of equal rate
of growth, and larger trees, unless on
the shady side, should be 100 feet
apart. A fertile soil that is reason
ably moist is best fur nut trees, well
drained clay loam being the most de
sirable.
Variety is next in importance to soil
and location. Experienced observers
know that nut trees do not come true
to seed, and that the only w*ay to
reproduce a variety or an identical
type Is by grafting or budding, as Is
done with apples, peaches, pears, and
other fruits. Nurseymen in the north
ern part of the country are now propa
gating several varieties of black wal
nuts, pecans, hickories, and butternuts
by these methods, but due to the fact
that active Interest begun only a de
cade ago. none of these varieties has
Well Developed Black Walnut, Highly
Prized for Its Ornamental Value and
the Nuts It Produces.
been given much opportunity to
demonstrate its usefulness ns a
money-crop producer. However, sev
eral varieties are promising.
Mature native trees that are well
situated may be made more valuable
by top-working. By “top-working” is
meant the replacing of the original
top with a new top of another variety.
It has been practiced for a long time
by fruit growers to increase the value
of seedling trees and trees of inferior
varieties, and owners of nut trees are
now adopting the method. The steps
to be taken are: (1) The selection of
trees, taking into account the things
just mentioned; (2) the choice of
varieties to be used, and the making
sure of scions or bud sticks at the
proper time; (3) the cutting back of
the tops during the latter part of the
dormant period or very early in the
spring; (4) the actual process of
grafting or budding; and (5) the!
subsequent care of the new growth.
Cutting Back the Tops.
In cutting back the tops preparatory
to budding or grafting, certain rules
should be rigidly followed: (1) No cut
should be made where a limb is mere
than six Inches in dliimeter, and a
limit of three inches is preferred; (2)
all chts should be made so they will
lien! of themselves If. by chance, they
receive no further attention; (8) cu’h
should be made in late winter while
the trees are still dormant, or, at the
latest, Just before the leaves appear;
(4) cuts should always be made
slightly above a bud, which will as
sure renewal In case the graft should
fall.
Grafting may be done by the com
mon cleft method or tne slip-bark
method. The former Is usually em
ployed when the tree is still dormant
and the latter at any time during the
growing period, but the scions used
must always be dormant, and .as
scions in that condition are seldom
available after the first of April
neither method Is of much interest
just now. It is now too late to top
work trees this season, but those that
have been cut back and small trees
that may be budded without cutting
back may be left until late summer or
autumn, so that scions (then called
bud sticks) of the better varieties may
be obtained and buds from them in
serted In the bark of the new shoots.
Specially devised tools for remov
ing frpds from the bud sUcks and
for removing pieces of bark of Identl
cal size from the stock are on the
market. Several are illustrated In
Farmers’ Bulletin 700, Pecan Culture,
which contains much information of
Interest to nut propagators, and which
may he obtained by writing, to the
Department of Agriculture. Washing
ton. D. C. Budding by the “patch
bud" method may be done at any time
when the bark of the stock slips
readily. On trees of rapid growth the
bark will slip at almost any time in
the summer. On young trees not cut
back budding may be done in the first
half of the growing season, whereas
new shoots grown from below cut-off
tops should be of sufficient size for
budding during the latter half of the
season. Dry spells frequently cause
the bark to tighten, but rains will
loosen It later. The season for bud
ding sometimes extends until the trees
begin to go dormant. During the lat
ter half of the season buds may be
selected from those formed at the
hase of the present season’s growth.
Most of them will remain dormant
until the following spring.
DEATH WARRANTS FOR
ALL INFERIOR SIRES
Farmers List Stock and Agree to
Use Only Purebreds
Liv® Stock Owners Show Determina
tion to Put Herds of Entire Com
munity on Better Paying
Basis—Many Enroll.
(Prepared by the United States Department
of Agriculture.)
The determination of groups and as
soclationa of live-stock owners to put
herds of entire communities on a bet
ter paying basis is shown by records
of the United States Department of
Agriculture in connection with its bet
ter-sires activities. Participation in
the federal-state campaign for “Better
Sires-Better Stock” Involves the sign
ing of a blank in which a farmer lists
his breeding stock and agrees to use
purebred sires for all classes of farm
animals kept. The blanks are dis
tributed in most cases by county
agents and are virtually death war
runts for grade and scrub sires.
In one day recently the department
received 182 such blanks signed by
farmers In Rockingham county, Vir
ginia, and Indorsed by Charles W.
Wampler, county agent. Other large
numbers received In one day from in
dividual communities were 39 from
Green county, Ohio, and 37 from
Guernsey county, Ohio.
Purebred sires of inferior quality
are often disposed of along with
scrubs and grades in accordance with
the requirement that the purebreds
listed must be of sufficient merit to be
worthy of heading herds and flocks.
COLLAR OF BIG IMPORTANCE
Should Fit Neck and Shoulders of
Horse to Prevent Sores—Bathe
in Salt Water.
Since the power of a horse is ap
plied through the collar, it is of nt*
most importance that the collar should
tit the neck and shoulders. Careless
ness In using badly fitting collars not
only develops sores and ugly scars but
many times causes horses to become
balky. Horses’ shoulders should be
bathed in salt water every evening in
harden them.
&f>e HOOVER
J Be»t Vacuum Cleaner
on EZ>e MarKet
SHOSHOWE ELECTRIC light and power co.
BECK President
IF YOU WANT A REAL MEAL TRY THE j
HART CAFE. |
GENUINE HOME COOKING
CLEAN LINEN
EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE
• AND PIES LIKE MOTHER USED TO MAKE
—ONLY BETTER
CET YOUR MONEY’S WORTH
LUMP COAL $4.25 $7.00
Best in Cody At Mine Delivered
Correct Weight; One Price io All
Phone iBB Native coal co.
otto I. nelson, Manager
I I " 1
r EARNEST RICCI
Dealer in
TOFT DRINKS
Cigars Cards Gaines
Boot.blacK Stand i[
fr- " ■ - - - '
WATKINS-PRANTE TRANSFER
Baggage, Express
All Kinds of Hauling
Telephone 5, or i 47 Cody, wyo.
IL —'j>
You Will Never Get Stung at
DULY’S
i «t<-
BUSY BEE ' |
£ I
\K/
Lunch JwL Room i
\
8 OR THE !
I \
i BUSY POOL HALL |
DULIS AVDIS, Prop. ;
An ad in this paper is an Investment
PAGE SEVEN

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