OCR Interpretation


The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, July 26, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Wyoming Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92066925/1922-07-26/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 26, 1922.
M. CHAMBERLIN
DENTIST
HOTEL CHAMBERLIN
' • Cody, Wyoming
The Mint Case
We U»e the Celebrated
CORONA BLEND COFFEE
Made in Electric Percolator
TABLES FOR LADIES
Soft Drinks, Smokes, and
Good Candies In
Connection
We serve Eastern corn-fed
Beef—Steaks a Specialty
Home Made Chile
Everything Good to Eat
DWIGHT E. HOLLISTER
Attorney-at-Law
Cody, Wyoming
Pioneer Bldg. Phone 98
Howerton 4 Scholes
General Contracting
Mill and Cabinet Work
Estimates Furnished
. Fire Wood r
MAKE EVERY HOUR
A HAPPY HOURI
Pool Billiards
Cards • Bowling
LUNCH COUNTER
With Blanche Gokel fixin’
np the eats
LOVE’S PLACE
Dave Shelley
Saddles
■ > . COW BOY BOOTB
Hyer, Justin and Teitxel
on Hand
Chaps, Bits and Spurs
Tourists Outfits 11
Rfl : “"j - fl
SI,OOO Reward
will be paid for information lead
ing to the arrest and conviction
of any person or persons killing
or stealing stock belonging to
W. R. COE
Cody, Wyoming
I? ■■ > "*•*7
White Lunch
Open Again and
Doing Business
BETTER THAN EVER!
Try a Cup of Our Coffee
With Pure Cream
—HOME MADE PIES—
Mike Miller, nop
Alaskan Natives
Mourn Kilbuck
Gloom in the Far Northland Fol
lows Death of Beloved Indian
Missionary.
WILL NOT FORGET HIS WORK
From Kansas to Arctic John Henry
Kilbuck Carried the Gospel,
Ing Lives and Winning Love
of Natives.
Juneav.—There Is gloom among the
natives in Alaska today.
From Point Barrow—the farthest
north—to Metlakatla and Juneau In
the south; from the headwaters of
the Kuskokwim and Yukon down to
the sea, is traveling forth the word
that “Kilbuck is dead.” Everywhere
the news permeates, there follows sad
ness. Grown men and women among
the Eskimos and Indians grieve like
children. All because the “most loved
man beyond 54-40” is no more.
For more than iour decades John
Hanry Kilbuck, Muncie Indian of the
old Delaware nation that roamed over
Pennsylvania before the days of
Washington and William Penn, had
be/?* intimately associated with the
Kllnklts and Takus of southeastern
Alaska, or the Eskimos and breed
tribes around Point Barrow. With
his pale-face wife he was guardian,
counselor, spiritual guide and friend.
Will Not Forget Him.
But the country which John Kilbuck
played such an Important part Ln de
veloping will not forget him. The
thousands of reindeer that roam the
tundras under the watchful eye of
their native shepherds, will forever
remind the natives of him. It was
Kilbuck who, at the request of the
United States government. Introduced
reindeer prorogation In Alaska, and
by so doing he banished the specter
of famine that periodically wiped out
entire tribes when the hard times
came and the winters closed In before
they were prepared.
Akjak and Bethel, both founded by
the Moravian missionary, some day
may grow into flourishing cities when
Alaska comes Into its own. And they
vjll cherish his memory.
Doings of missionaries, as a rule,
make rather tame reading. But the
activities of* John Kilbuck and his
wife were not confined to strictly spir
itual things.
Four different times did the Kil
bucks go “below” with the intention
of spending their declining years in
the States. And four times they went
back. The call was Irresistible.
The last time—it was to have been
different. With all the best Intentions,
accentuated by memories of past fail
ures to keep good resolutions —the
pioneer torchbearers of civilization re
solved to spend their declln’ - years
near the homes of their forefathers—
on the Chippewa Indian reservation
down in Kansas.
Deep down in their hearts, however,
they had a “hunch” that the North
would win. It always had.
So the North Won Again.
In their little white and green cot
tage, nestling in the Chippewa hills
and overlooking the placid Marais des
Cygnes river in eastern Kansas the
Kilbucks were waiting. Waiting for
word that the break-up in the Yukon
and Kaskokwira was about to begin.
They had reached their decision.
“They need us. The influenza has
reached Alaska. If it gets Into the
Interior before we do nobody knows
what will happen. Thousands may
perish. Their deer, now numbering
thousands, will be cast adrift over the
Sun Yat Sen Welcomed at Kweilin
W/w/ ■ x t i
pF.
T'JSF'i
Sun Yat Sen. head of the government of South China at Canton, may now
be induced tu submit to the Peking government, since General Chang, whose
cause he espoused, has been defeated. The photograph shows Dr. Sun being
welcomed Dy the citizens of Kweilin after his army took possession of that
Mty.
tundras—prey to wolves and wild dogs
and equally unscrupulous ‘breeds.’ ”
With the first word of the thaw
they took a stehmer out of Seattle.
They arrived none too soon. Influ
enza already was taking its toll. But
they did get there in time to save
hundreds.
The Kilbucks took up their work
where they had left off upon their de
parture for the States. They were
just whipping things Into shape and
getting comfortably settled for the
last chapter of their life’s book when
pneumonia and typhoid, diseases from
which they had saved thousands of
Uncle Sam’s little Indian wards,
struck home. In three days Kilbuck
was dead.
It was back in I*Bs that John Kli
buck and his white wife arrived in
Alaska. He had just graduated from
the Moravian Missionary school at
Nazareth, Pa., where he had been
sent by a Christian worker among
the Kansas Indians.
It took years to gain the confidence
of the Alaska natives, but patience
and kindness finally won and now no
name is better known or more beloved
among the Alaska Indians or Eskimos
than Kilbuck.
Gets Recipes
of Cannibals
English Woman Novelist Learns
Ways of New Guinea Epicures
During Long Sojourn.
THEIR MANNERS ARE PRAISED
Says Hypnotism Prevails Among Na
tives to An Extent Appearing In
credible —Position of Women
Is Deplorable.
London.—Miss Beatrice Grimshaw,
the well known novelist, who has been
15 years In the South Sea Islands, has
returned from New Guinea. As an
indication of the wilderness and the
unknown character of the vast tracts
of territory comprising that country
she mentioned that quite recently the
missionaries, with the aid of airplanes,
had discovered a valley containing 10,-
000 people whose existence had not
even be»n suspected. They were found
to be living at an altitude where it
was imagined that human life could
not endure. She had a wonderful sto
ry to tell of her experiences. To a
representative of the Evening Standard
she said:
“New Guinea is one of the most
noteworthy countries in the world,
and a great deal of it has never been
explored by white people. Within a
certain distance the government has
done a great deal, but there are
stretches in which cannibal tribes live
to themselves. Many, however, are
induced to work on the plantations,
and the cannibals are certainly the fin
est native workers, because of their
physical development and their de
meanor. But cannibalism flourishes,
and the people who practice It do not
regard it as wrong. In the interior
cannibals live to themselves, and It is
only when they come under British
jurisdiction that their cannibalistic
tendencies are checked. One gets so
accustomed to this question of canni
balism that It is accepted almost as a
AUTOMATIC LIGHTHOUSE
II
Jr T;
f :• •
I H /J
New automatic lighthouse recently
completed at Barry Holmes Gower,
England. The only attention it needs is
to be replenished once in two years
with chemicals. When the actinic
light value reaches a certain degree It
lights itself, and when the daylight
reaches a corresponding degree, it ex
tinguishes itself.
matter of course. I know the cookery
recipes now as to the best methods of
preparing human food.
Huge Stove Oven Used.
“In one part of the country there Is
a stone oven six feet long dug Into
a side of a hill for the purpose of
dealing with the victims. The inhab
itants of one village may attack an
other. The prisoners are tortured ter
ribly, and then eaten. One method Is
to take out their eyes and then roast
the body alive in the traditional three
legged caldron. The cannibals break
the bones and legs of their victims be
forehand sometimes, and then let the
body lie In a running stream, which
method, thejJ believe, makes the meat
more tender. The odd feature of It
all Is that the most determined canni
bals are extremely well-mannered, and
In all other respects are the best work
ers you can find. As to whether can
nibalism springs from the love of hu
man flesn or Is merely a ritual one
cannot say. I think the cannibals real
ly like the human flesh. But you can
not get them to talk about it.
“Sorcery has a remarkable hold on
the people in this country, and the
occult powers that are displayed can
only be regarded by white people as
amusing. The natives even have a
sorcerers’ university where natives are
taught for a period of two years.
Sorcerers can carry poisonous and
dangerous snakes in their hair, ami
can train them to bite people, leaving
them loose In a house, and it is even
possible, it is said, to make a snake
bite a particular person. Equally ex
traordinary are the powers possessed
by conjurors.
“I believe these natives understand
hypnotism from end to end. They do
table-turning with a sort of alligator
shaped image. They ask questions of
spirits, and see blue lights. This hap
pens in the Gulf country. The power
of hypnotism is used to an extent
that seems barely credible, but there
is to my mind, that certain
natives are believed to hypnotize
whole audiences, and they do it in
one Instance by means of a dance of
the most peculiar character. I have
seen-this dance, and the extraordinary
effect of it. The performer apparently
dominates the whole of the room by
his actions. The effect of the dancing
Is that hypnosis on a massed scale like
this can be induced In the wlerdest
possible way.
“Several people have tried to Inves
tigate the meaning of the mind, but
they have not succeeded. It Is quite
obvious that the natives are saturated
In hypnotism as a result of the prac
tice of many centuries, which enables
them to do all sorts of things that to
us are always inexplicable. I do not
admire spiritualism or hypnotism, and
I am rather glad to find that it has Its
roots among savages.
“The position of women Is deplor
able. They are In effect slaves. Mar
riage Is by purchase, and It Is usually
dependent on the number of pigs that
can be offered by the bridegroom to
the bride’s parents. The pig, in fact.
Is thought to be of very much more
value than the wife.’’
Tree That Grew Apples
Now Produces Cherries »
A tree that produced apples »
Inst year and Is filled with cher- *
ries this year, is the unusual *
sight on the William Bagley >
farm, near Onancock, Dei. The ?
tree was '’lie of several pur- $
chased from a nursery, and was J
bought for an apple tree. In ;
every appearance it is an apple ;
tree. Last year it bore for the 2
first time three fine app.es. This «
year the tree is filled w'fholier- 2
rles and not a sign of rn apple. Z
JHEK Ghe HOOVER.
/U Best Vacuum Cleaner
J on MarKet
SHOSHONE ELECTRIC LIGHT AM POWER CO.
Cady, Wyoming
Pr..ld.nt
I • l
I If YOU WANT A REAL MEAL TRY THE |
I |
I HART CAFK I
i A
? GENUINE HOME COOKING
1 CLEAN LINEN
EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE
- AND PIES LIKE MOTHER USED TO MAKE |
—ONLY BETTER
E
/?===S=S=, ' ■ ■ JWSg»aL,.-.! ======■ -.-Tff?
GET YOUR MONEY’S WORTH
LUMP COAL $4.25 $7.00
Best in Cody At Mine Delivered
Correct Weight; One Price to All
pink 188 Native coal co.
one I. nuson, Manager
EARNEST RICCI
Dealer in
SOFT DRINKS
Cigars Cards Games 5
Boot-blacK Stand
ir ■ ■ ' ■' - ' - ’ ?
WATKINS-PRANTE TRANSFER
Baggage, Express
All Kinds of Hauling
Telephone 5, or in Codg, Wyo.
k- ■ - J
I You Will Never Get Stung at I
DULY’S I
I
Lunch Room j
g !
g OR THE f
BUSY POOL HALL
DULIS AVDIS, Prop. J
An ad in this paper is an Investment
PAGE THREE

xml | txt