OCR Interpretation


The Cody enterprise and the Park County enterprise. (Cody, Wyo.) 1921-1923, September 06, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Wyoming Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92066925/1922-09-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

EVERYBODY READS THE ENTERPRISE—EVEN IF THEY BORROW IT!
Founded In 1899 by Col.
W. F. Cody (“Buffalo
BUT) and Col. Peake.
VOLUME XXIV. NUMBER 5
REPUBLICAN COUNTY
CBMBinEEMEETTD
aEBTNEWDFHCEBS
The meeting of the Republican
County Central Committee held at
the Methodist Church at noon Friday,
September first, proved a very satis
factory affair from every point of
view. Through the kindness of some
■of the hospitable ladies of uie party '
a very pleasing and satisfactory I
luncheon was served after which the '
regular business of the meeting was
taken up and disposed of. This was
the regular bennial meeting, ncld
primarily for the organizing of the
newly elected committee, and the
attendance was large and enthusiastic* ,
practically every precinct in the coun
ty being represented either in person
by its memberelect or by proxy. The
election of officers resulted j;c the
following: chairman, Ora S. Son.ers;
vice chairman, C. H. Davison; treas
urer, H. L. Bowers; secretary, Ernest
J. Goppert; member of state commit •
tee, C. G. Diliavou. The matte** of
the vacancy in the candidacy tor clerk
of the district court, caused by rhe I
death of George S. Russell was taken
up and appropriate res Nations rela -
tive to Mr. Russell’s death were pass- j
ed. Mrs. Orilla Downing. .'lnstils!
daughter and for the past year deputy
clerk, was unamiously chosen to fill
the vacancy and will be regularly
placed upon the ticket as the party’s
candidate for this office. The spirit
off the meeting was that of harmon
ious enthusiasm and a number of
short but effective speeches were
enthusiasticly received.
NEW GEYSER SPOUTS
IN YELLOWSTONE PARK
Yellowstone Parkes new geyaer,
which “blew up” several weeks ago,'
breaking all geyser records for height;
of its stream and violence of its e-1
ruption is performing again.
Afte the first few days of activity
the new geyser, which has been un
officially called the ‘Semi-Centennial’'
since it chose the fiftieth anniversary
of the Park‘B creation to assert itself,
quieted down and only gave occassion
al spurts of steam and muddy water
to remind Park's visitors of its pre
vious performances in. flooding the
roads around for about a radius of a
hundred feet or more.
week, however, the geyser
commenced operating again and has
since been playing at irregular inter
Vais several times a day. The spouts
on these occasions reach various
heights between 100 and 200 feet.
Several times, also, it has thrown mud
and water on the roadway which runs
beside the muddy hot pool where the
geyser has its source.
The new phenomenon is proving a
great attraction to motor parties from
cities nearby the Park. Since the
spouter resumed activities, scores of
parties have been in, in order to be
able to witness the new geyser dis
play before the close of the Park
Beas in.
TROUT PLANTED IN
LOCAL STREAMS BY
CLUB AND FORESTRY
On Sunday, September 3rd, there
was received in Cody a shipment of
134,500 trout requisitioned by the loc
al Rod and Gun Club and the Forest
Service, for planting in local streams. |
Os this number 112,500 were Black j
Spotted fry, and 22,000 were Eastern i
Brook fingerlings. These were plant- .
ed by local cooperators, members of I
the Rod and Gun Club and Forest j
officers, in small spring creeks trib- 1
utary to tlie South Fork of the Sho-1
shone River, and in the vicinity of;
Meteetsee. Fifty - three cans were ,
planted on the South Fork.
Numerous reports of damage done
this summer by water sprouts indicate
that the loss of fish in all streams in
this vicinity has been enormous, and
next year unusually heavy stocking
will be necessary if we hope to make
this vicinitv the best fishing region
in the United States.
FLOUR MILL IS •
MAKING SOE REPAIRS
The Cody Flour mill, now under the
management of P. E. Markham, is
now being thoroughly overhauled and
put in first class shape for the sea
eon’s grind/ which it is expected will
start the early part of next month.
The past season has been quite a
successful one and It is anticipated
that this year’s operations will be
quite satisfactory.
eJfie Cody Enterprise
CODY, PARK COUNTY, WYOMING*—GATEWAY TO YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK
NOTED LECTURER
TO SPEAK HERE
FOR THE EAGLES
Judge Thomas Edward O'Donnell of
Kansas City, one of the most able of
the lecturers for the Eagle lodge, will
be in Cody on Saturday, September 16
and will give a free lecture at the
Temple theatre in the evening. His
lectures are said to be very intersting
and mmbers of the local lodge are en
deavoring to get a full house to hear
him.
One of the features of the evening
will be a free picture show which
will precede the lecture.
HORRIBLE ANXIETY WHEN
MEN ARE REPORTED TRAP-
PED IN MINE ABOVE CODY
Faces of Cody citizens, especially
those of Scandinavian persuasion,
went white last Friday when a report
reached town that several miners had
been entombed in a mine shaft in the
Jim Creek locality above Cody, the
shaft having been flooded by a water
spout
Help was rushed to the scene and
since that time desperate efforts have.
been made to to get the shaft reop
ened.
The report of the men being en
tombed has not been confirmd but lit
tie interest has been taken in that
feature of the report. The reasc nso
much anxiety was displayed is that
the washout occurred at the Copen
hagen mine on Snus mountain and as
soon as the damage is repaired a fresh
supply of snus will be available to our
citizens. It will, as usual, be distrlb- j
uted through our popular amusement
parlor, the Mint
DISCOVERS THAT BUFFALO BILL
NOT A FICTITIOUS CHARACTER
Elbert Bede, editor of the Cottage
Grove (Ore.) Sentinel who with others
recently toured to Minnesota, says in
an account of the trip published in his
paper:
"At Cody we found that Buffalo Bill,
whose former pioneer hut we had
passed in the mountains, was no
mythical character. His pictures were
featured wherever postal cards were
sold. Cody was named for him as
most people probably know, and that
was his home for many years.
“We stepped into an ice cream par
lor and were surprised to find the
proprietor to be Mrs. Hughes, mother
of Gladys Hughes, well known in Cot
tage Grove but temporarily a resident
of Alaska.”
DISTRICT COURT IN
SESSION THIS WEEK
The District Court is now in ses
sion for a special term which com
mences September first and will prob
ably continue until about the fif
teenth.
Court convened Friday morning with
Judge Metz presiding and Friday
and Saturday were taken up with
default cases and various minor mat
ters. Monday, morning with Judge
Burgess presiding, the case off Aid
rich et al. vs Burliam & Deane was I
taken up and at this writing is still
occupying the attention of the court
This litigation arises from a contract
entered into between the owners of
the Lake View Irrigation project, and
involves the ownership off water con- !
tracts valued at about $31,000. It is
a case of considerable importance,
and has brought to our court an array
of out of town lawyers. W. L. Simp- I
son as attorney for the plaintiffs is *
being assisted by W. E. Mullen of 1
Cheyenne, while the defendants are |
being represented by Hyde & Browne I
of Basin, assisted by H. F. Rose of j
Omaha. There will be no criminal
cases tried at the present term, but
it is expected that the civil cases will
be cleaned up. Judge Metz left for
Basin Tuesday but will return at the
completion of the Lake View case
and resume his duties for the balance
of the term.
NATRONA LAMBS BRING 11c
CASPER —Eleven cents a pound
was the ruling price paid here in the
contracting ff 16,000 head of Natrona
county lambs by Colorado buyers last
Friday. The deal included 12,000
head sold by A. J. Cunningham to S.
F. Webster of Fort Collins: 3,350
head by the Diamond Rin® company
to the W. A Snyder Commission com
pany and 450 head by Robert Morton
to the same company.
John Hogg left for Laramie on
Thursday where he will attend the
University of Wyoming this winter.
AND THE PARK COUNTY ENTERPRISE
C. R. SNYDER KILLED WHEN CAR
LEAVES ROAD AND PLUNGES INTO
CANYON. DOPY FOUND NEXT MORNING
Tragedy stalked In Shoshone can-/
yon Monday night, when C. R. Snyder,
honored pioneer of the Cody country, I
came to his death when the car in j
which he was riding alone plunged!
over o forty-foot embankment.
Mr. Snyder’s automobile had been
left by other parties in Yellowstone
park and he had gone there to drive
it home. He left Holm Lodge at ’<
o’clock Monday evening and it is ev
dent that the accident occurred about
9:30 at night, although it was unwit
nessed by human eye.
It is evident that when he had
reached a point in the canyon about
two miles east of the Shoshone dam
the aged man lost sight of the road in
making a turn and the car plunged oft
the grade. Mr. and Mrs. A Mullen
who were a short distance ahead o
Mr Snyder noticed that his headlights
were burning dimly and it is possible
that they went out entirel just before
the accident
The car made an qlmost sheer drop
of forty feet and Mr. Snyder had e
dently struck on his head which was
badly bruised. Death was probably
instantaneous. The car rolled on
down th slope for a distance of about
100 feet
Nothing was known of the accident
RETURNS SHOW VOTES CAST FOR FRANK W. MONDELL
WERE THREE TO ONE OVER JOHN 0. KENDRICK
Ip the recent primary election Frank
j W. Mondell, Republican candidate for
! the United States Senate, outdid the
Democratic-Non-Partisian league can
didate, John B. Kendrick, by a vote
’of 2 to 1. The returns, with only 67
precincts out of 648 are lacking; show
1 that Mondell polled nearly 7,000 vo‘e»
more than he did in the congress
ional primary two years ago, a truly
phenom Inal showing..
: Nor is the Democratic boast of Ken
drick’s popularity in his own home
county, Sheridan, borne out by tae r?
turns. In this county, on the pre
primary assurance off the Democrats.
Mondell was to get nothing at all. Y°t
Mondell’s vote in Sherid in county thi
year was almost double that rolled
by him in 1920. And iu this connect
ion it is worth mentioning that 1926
was a presidental year, which usually
brings out an abnormally heavy vote.
Primary returns with precincts
lacking; give:
Frank W. Mondell, rep. 22,758;
John B. Kendrick, N-P league dem.
11.750.
Complete returns on Mondell—com
plete figures for Kendrick are not
candidate 25,124.
In the 1920 primaries he polled only
18,303; yet in the general election
that followed, his vote was 34,689.
The total state vote for all congres
sional candidates in the genera’ elect-
CLOSING SEASON IS THE
LARGEST IN HISTORY
OF TOURISTS IN PARK
The 1922 tourist season is nearing
its close. Soon the summer visitors,
like the* birds, will have sought their
winter quarters.
The numerous resorts located in
the Shoshone Forest have enjoyed a
very good season. More people, than
ever beore, hav patronized them.
Our roads have been in better shape
than usual, and this fact accounts for,
in a large measure, the increased
travel. The North Fork road, the
Park, is seriously handicapped by the
narrow, steep trail thru the Shoshone
Canyon, and some improvement must
be made at that point if we wise to
handle our share of the tourist trade.
The preent road should be relocated
so as to eliminate the heavy grades
It should also be widened and the
road on the south side of the river
should be finished. This will take
a lot of money, but eventually it will
be done. By co-operation with the
Forest service and the Park service
and the State, the necessary funds
will be raised.
In the meantime why not improv
the road running around the south
side of the Reservoir? This will take
care of the local traffic and eliminate
congestion to a great extent, since
those who have seen the Canyon
would naturally prefer the route hav
ing the easiest grade.
I until Tuesday morning when F. E.
Reed of Worland discovered the
! wreck and reported to local officers,
; who went up and brought the remains
j to Cody.
In the death of Mr. Snyder Cody
loses one of her real pioneers.
Cyrus Replogle Snyder was born in
Curryville, Pennsylvania, July 25,
1861. He first came to* Wyoming in
1897, locating near Lander, and in the,
following year came to Cody. He I
homesteaded on the South Fork where ;
he has since made his home, engaging i
in ranching and livestock raising.]
Everyone who knew C. R. Snyder, or
“Pap” Snyder as he was called, had,
grown to honor and respect him as a |
man among men.
He leaves a widow and six sons—
Simon, Perry, Merrill, Clarence and
Harold, all of the Cody locality, and
Glen, whose home is in Maine.
This is the third tragic death in the
family within a few years. One son
perished when he was lost in the
mountains in the vicinity of Sheridan
and anothr was drowned while at
training camp near Great Falls, Mont.
Funeral services will be conducted
by Rev. A M. Shepperd at the Mason
ic Temple at 10 o’clock Friday morn
morning and interment will be made
in the cemetery at Valley.
ion of 1920 —a presidential year was
56,421. It is scarcely probable that
the vote this year will be as heavy
but even iff it is, Mondell will need
less than 3,500 more votes than he
got in the primary to insure election,
in the general election of 1920 he got
16,386 more votes than he did in the
primaries of the same year.
Kendrick, in order to be elected,
on a basts of 1920 ffigures would have
to increase his primary vote of 11,750
(67 precincts missing) by approxi
mately 16,000. On the basis of this
year’s primary figures, he woudl have
to double his vote in order to beat
the Republican candidate, and then
only if the Mondell vote remained
absolutely stationar —a preposterous
supposition.
If the Democrats can extract any
comfort from such figures they are
certainly entitled ti it, but whatever
crumbb there is will scarcely make
them fat.
They have proffessed to find com
fort in the thought Mondell ran some
w’hat behind the combined vote for
the Republican gubernatorial canii
dates. Queer comfort indeed for dem
ocrats ti cherish, but even so the an
swer is obvious.
Mondell, being unopposed in the
primaries and deemed unbeatable at
any time, the Republicans made no
especial effort to get ont a record
vote for him. On the other hand,
the Democrats, desperately eager to
make a showing, rsorted to extraord
inary measures in behalf of Kendrick.
These extraordinary measures in
cluded a letter from th Democratic
state chairman to all county chair
men instructing them to appoint at
least three captains for every pre
cinct, these captains to call personal
ly if need be on every known Demo
crat in their rspective precincts with
a view to getting out every Demo
cratic vote
To sum up, Mondell led Kendrick
in the primaries by 2to 1. He scored
material and, in many instances, re
markable gains in all save three coun
tlesont of twenty-three, and in one
of these three failures is accounted
for in the creation of a new county.
In three counties—Albany, Big Horn,
and Carbon—the Mondell vote, over
that of two years ago, is almost treb
led, anl it is very nearly doubled in
a number of ether counties, notably
—Get this.its worth repeating:—Sher
idan county, the home of Mr. Ken
drick.
So much forthat “silent vote”, pa
thetic product of Mr. Joseph C. O’Ma
honey’s fertile Imagination. In ther
clear light offact and figure It would
seem that this O’Matoney figment
is more prayer than serious, respon
sible suggestion—a “silent prayer’ for
the miracle that must be had if De
mocracy this November ii to be saved
from utter and overw.ieiming defeat.
Nothing short of a mirage ran save
it! ft
WDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1922
SHOOTS HIS FRIEND
IN THE HEAD WHEN
DARED TO TRY SKILL
On last Thursday afternoon, near
foreman of the Antler herd wagon,
Lodge Grass Mont., William Cosgrove
shot and killed Henry Lemondoff af
ter an argument over Cosgrove’s
shooting skill
According to reports Cosgrove
boasted of his shooting.
“You can’t shoot my hat off,” Lem
ondoffff said.
Cosgrove shot and missed.
“Shoot again,” said Lemondoff.
Cosgrove shot again, the bullet hit
ting Lemondoff behind the ear.
Lemondoff lived about three hours.
RECITAL AND CONCERT
WILL BE GIVEN AT THE
METHODIST CHURCH
On next Friday evening at the
Methodist Church, under the auspices
of the Camp Fire Girls organization,'
Harold Van Horne, the boy Pianoist
wonder will appear iu recital assisted
by the Camp Fire Girls giving a con
cerL
The following is the program that
has been prepared for the recital.
1 Invitation to th Dance Weber ‘
Butterfly Creig
Gavotti Gluck-Brahms
2 Military Polonaise
Etude Op. 25 No. 9
Nocturne G Major Chopin
Scherzo B flat Minor *
9 Funeral March Mendelssohn
If I Were a Bird Henselt
Evenjng Star Wagner-Liszt
4 Rigoletto Verdi-Liszt
Turkey In the Straw
David W. Gunion
The eollowing is an excerpt which I
appeared in the Laramie Republican
last may of the wonders performed
by Harold Van Horne. “The Fort
nightly Musical Club has done many
fine things for the city this year in
the way of supplying first-class musi
cal entertainments, bat last night in
addition to giving the public the ben
efit of a recital by Harold Van Horne,
the boy pianist from Powelk -who
won the prize in the Musical contest!
last spring they also, because of the j
fee which he received from them,
made possible his attndance upon the!
activities of Music Week in the Col
orado CapitoL
The young master of the piano has
won two medals, one being, awarded
to him in Chicago School of Music.
The young man is 13 years of age
and a son of Wyoming.
BOYS HAVE NARROW
ESCAPE FROM DEATH
Five well known local young men
narrowly escaped death Wednesday
night when a car driven by Thornton
Schwoob struck a concrete abutment
and turned over in an irrigation ditch
this side of Powell.
The car pinned them in the water
and death by drowning impended.
Through good fortune Milward Simp
son happened along almost immedi
ately and by apparently superhuman
effort succeeded in rescuing the oc-j
cupants.
As it was, Orin Kerrigan sustained a I
badly broken leg which will lay him
up for a good while.
The other members of the party
were Wilbur Tinkcom and William
Holbrook of Cody and Charles Lawton
of Los Angeles, all of whom escaped i
with a few bruises and cuts.
ELIAS MARTIN, PASSES
OVER THE GREAT DIVIDE
Elias Martin, a well known pioneer
of the Cody section, died at the Powell
hospital on Monday of this week after
an extended illness. He was 46 years
Christopher Elias Martin was born
in lowa January 22, 1876. He first
came to Wyoming in 1882, locating in
the Sheridan country. He came to
Cody in 1893 and has since followed
ranching on the North Fork. He was
known to everyone in this locality as
an honest, industrious and altogether
worthy citizen.
He leaves a father, B. F. Martin, a
brother, A. J. Martin, three sisters,
Mrs. D. M. Trimmer, Mrs. E, J, Brun
dage and Mrs, M. E. Glasgow. All the
above reside in the Cody locality ex
cept Mrs. Glasgow, whose home is in
Long Beach, Calif.
Funeral services were conducted by
Rev. A. M. Shepperd at the Masonic
Temple on Wednesday afternoon and
interment was made in Riverside cem
etery, the burial services being in
charge of the Odd Fellows, of which
th deceased was a member.
>■■ - -
The policy of this paper Is
Ito uphold the standards
| and perpetuate the spirit
, of the old West.
ISSUED EVERY WEDNESDAY
C. G. DILLAVOU OF
POWELL IS ELECTED
REP.COMMITTEEMAH
When the Republican County Cen
tral Committee metaphorically speak
ing, quietly fastened the proverbial
tin receptacle to the caudal append
age of L. L. Newton as state commit
teeman, it did a good job, and one
which we firmly believe will result
in great material benefit to the party.
In theory at least, these local polit
ical organizations are supposed to be
the instruments of the party, to be
used for the party’s benefit and ad
vancement When such an organiza
tion is made the tool of an individual
or a small coterie and is used for
personal financial aggrandizement or
for the advancement of personal hob
bies and extreme propaganda of an
extra-political nature, such use is a
prostitution of the organization and
abharent to all fair minded party* men.
For two years thee Republican
party in Park County has been made
to serve the personal purposes of one
man and has been made to hear the
onus of responsibility for the extreme
propaganda and administrative meth
ods of the ultra-reformists.
This is most unfair to the party.
The Republican party is no more
the party of the anti-saloon league
and its kindred organizations than it
is the party of the association against
the eighteenth amendment and its
affiliated groups.
Prohibition is not and never haa
been a political issue between the
; Republican and Democratic parties;
and any’ effort on the part of any one
affiliated with either party to make
| it appear otherwise is an unfriendly
| act toward the party afffected.
We have real politican issiea a
plenty without trying to ride personal
hobbles in on the chorus.
W’e have quiet hopes that the pass
ing of Len Leander will pressage an
era of harmony and success for the
Republican partv in Park County.
—.
DAVISON NEEDS AN
AN AEROPLANE
Our merchant prince—C. H. Davi
son—is a man of variegated career
so far as industry is concerned. Last
week he was called to Billings, there
to purchase a wealth of dry goods
for this shrine wheere good quality
reigns—Meeteetse’s big store. Upon
arrival in town he spent the night at
home then in the early hours of the
morn he wisked himself away to Cody
on another important business errand.
As a politician Chas. S. bei.ig ace high
in the Republican ranks here is much
wanted as extemporaneous talker and
in an advisory way, so tomorrow he
goes to Cody as a delegate to a meet
ing of the county central committee.
—Meeteese News.
DEMOCRATS ORGANIZE
AND ELECT OFFICERS
At a meeting of the Democratic
county central committee with the re
cently nominated candidates, held at
the court house on Monday night, the
organization for the coming campaign
was perfected.
John F. Cook was re-elected county
chairman and H. W. Darrah state
committeeman. County vice-chairmen
are A. A. Linton of Meeteetse and A.
A. Keyser of Powell. Harry Collins
was elected treasurer. A finance com
mittee was named, consisting of Rufus
Wilson of Meeteetse, A. S. McClain
of Cody and Eugene Ide of Powell.
Two women vice chairmen will be
selected later to organize the ladies
of Jeffersonian prsuasion in the coun
ty.
WOODRUFF WET
BUT A WINNER
Hon. J. D. Woodruff, the Shoshoni
pioneer, received 1221 votes for rep
resntative from Fremont county lead
ing his ticket by 200 votes in a field
of six candidates. In his home town
he received 89 out of 91 votes cast, a
world’s record. White Mr. Woodruff
openly opposes prohibition as the
greatest Joke in history, his victory
perhaps should not be called a wet
triumph, but the vote simply goes to
show that people are drifting away
from prohibition fanaticism and are
willing to elect men of unquestioned
integrity to office, trusting them to
conduct it in the best interests of
their constituents.
Mrs. Pearl Snyder is over from
Sheridan to attend the funeral of her
father-in-law, C. R. Snyder.

xml | txt