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The Northern Wyoming herald. (Cody, Wyo.) 1916-1924, August 11, 1916, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
Northern Wyoming Herald
Entered as second class matter October 27, 1910, at the postoffice at Cody,
Wyoming, under Act of Congress of March 3, 187°
L. L. NEWTON, Editor and Publisher
For President
CHARLES EVANS HUGHES
For Vice President '
CHARLES WARREN FAIRBANKS !
For U. S. Senator from Wyoming
CLARENCE DON CLARK
For U. S. Congressman from Wyoming
FRANK WHEELER MONDELL
PUSSYFOOTING PATRIOTS
Wyoming democrats stand convicted of deliberate violation
of the BDirit of the primary law.
It has been common knowledge for months that Governor
Kendrick would be the Democratic nominee for the United States,
senate.
In spite of his weak hearted denial that he would be a candi
date it has been the understanding that he and John Clark would
make the race for the two most important offices to be filled in
Wyoming this fall. j
By brow beating and intimidating other candidates they have
held the nominations open and having failed to file their declara
tion it will now be necessary to write the names of the candidates'
on the ballots.
By this method they hope to give the impression chat these
two “partiots” have been “forced” to enter the race.
But Wyoming people were not born yesterday and are fully
advised as to the machine methods of the Democrats, so much so
that they understand that this direct and deliberate evasion of the
spirit of the primary law is only another indication of the ring that
governs Wyoming—a machine that makes the Republican organ
ization they used to howl about look like a toy cart.
When the “martys” finally do come out the voters will be
ready for them and will see to it that Clark and Mondell are re
turned to Congress.
+— + —+
HELP THE FAIRS
One of the best ways to make a fair successful is to get the
interest of the schools. This was well shown in Jewell county,
Kansas, last year where 14 so-called farm, school and home festi
vals were held under the auspicies of the farm bureau and the
county agent. At these festivals the schools were urged to com
pete against each other in exhibitions of corn, grains of all kinds,
and in garden and orchard products. The exhibits were equal
to many at county fairs.
The rivalry between the various schools in these exhibits was
great and much enthusiam and keen interest was aroused. In
addition stock judging contests were held. When it came time to
hold the annual farm, school and home festival at the country
seat, the interest and enthusiasm were encountered everywhere
throught the country as winners in local contests were represent
ed in large numbers. In one day there was an attendance of ap
proximately 8,000 persons at the festival at Mankato. This fest
ival fair was so successful that this year the farmers are planning
even a greater fair.
♦—» + —
WOMAN’S PARTY O K’S HUGHES
The Democratic congress has buried down deep in a commit
tee pigeon hole the Mondell bill giving suffrage to women while
the sufs have been pulling their hair in anxiety.
Disappointed they have openly turned from the Democrats
and denounced them far and wide as being responsible because
they are in power.
In response to the declaration of Hughes that he was in favor
of suffrage Miss Ann H. Martin, chairman of the National
Woman’s party wired him: “Your declaration for the National
Woman’s suffrage amendment makes the women of America your
tiebtor for your courage and statesmanship.”
THE MAN
who buys and reads his home paper
demonstrates his patriotism and his in
telligence by the act.
The merchant who buys his printing
from his home paper gives a practical
demonstration of his belief in the policy
of trading at home.
This town is made up of two classes of
people—those who DO and those who
DON’T. Don’t be a "don’t.”
The Northern
Wyoming Herald
NORTHERN WYOMING HERALD
KEEP THE TOWN CLEAN
A clean town attracts attention whenever and wherever it is
seen. A dirty one catches the public eye in even less time.
When the streets and alleys and yards and vacant lots in a
town are clean and sanitary it bespeaks a like condition on the
part of the residents with regard to their personal habits.
The Lord loves a clean map or woman, and the devil worships j
a dirty one. Which do you prefer?
If each person in this town would use just a little more en
ergy and thoughtfulness we could make this one of the cleanest
spots in the country and our reputation would grow apace.
Not only would we benefit thustly, but the health of the com
munity would be vastly improved and the physical capacity of the
people would be greatly increased.
A clean man works with pleasure and with a definite object in
in view. Generally he gets there.
The dirty one labors from necessity only, has no ambition, and
is the black eye that kills the town in the eyes of other people.
Keep the town clean.
-4 4
WE ARE BEHIND THE TIMES
According to Logan Walter Page, director of the United
States office of Publicßoads.eightypercentofourcommercial com
modities : the things that we use in every day life—are hauled; at
some state of their transportation from the producing center of
consumption, over the public highways. The cost of hauling over
these highways is about 28 cents per ton per mile in this country,
while in France, where public highway improvement is at its best,
tbe cost in onlv 10 cents per ton per mile. It costs a farmer in
this country 1.6 more to haul a bushel of wheat 9 miles from his
larm to the neighboring market than it does to haul it from New
York to Liverpool, a distance of 3100 miles! What relation, then,
has the matter of good roads to the high cost of living? Two
hundred and fifty million dollars could be saved annually to the
! producer and the consumer by the maintenance of a uniform sys
tem of good roads.
♦ 4
_ HOUX FOR GOVERNOR
Along with the announcement that the Democrats would “de
mand” that Governor Kendrick be a candidate for United States
Senator in the vain hope to replace Senator Clarence D. dark,
comes the rumor that Frank L. Houx, now secretary of state
would be the candidate for the gubernatorial seat two years
hence.
With two years in which to get the practice and time to con
struct the proper fences Frank L. would naturally want to make
the race and win the place for himself.
It is certainly a laudable ambition on his part and were it not
for the fact that there are so many Republicans in Wyoming he
would stand a pretty good show of being elected.
*■ ♦ ♦
SHEEPMEN FOR HUGHES
The American Sheep Breeder comes out flat and says it’s for
Hughes. The reason is that Hughes is for the sheepman.
Can any of you Park county fellows tell us one thing the
Democratic party has ever done for the sheep industry ?
Not only that but every time it has been in power it has plung
ed its knife deep into your vitals.
Sure thing. Democratic sheep men are mighty scarce in Wyo
ming.
♦ ♦ ♦ '
If some of the former supporters of the primary law will now
come forward with a plan to put it out of business w-e might for
give them for the bum steer thev gave Wyoming.
♦ ♦ ♦
Some men are nominated under the primary system that
, never could get on a ticket if the wishes of the people were rep
] esented.
■ 4-+—4
Some things like free trade and the direct primary may be
all right in theory but they do not work out in actual practice.
+ 44
As far as our observation goes it looks to us as tho the prim
ary law only brings out the fellow that wants office.
* —4 —♦
The Democratic nartv believes in “America first,” at least in
its policy of levying taxes on the people at home.
WILSALL QUARTET LIKES CODY
W. R. Vinacke, J. W. Liek, A. K.
Cameron and Wesley Rampy, business
men as Wilsall, Montana, came down
the Cody way from Yellowstone park
Sunday and liked the scenery so well
decided to return the same way and
return to Montana thru the north
entrance. They regard the scenery
along the eastern road far superior
to anything in the park and are re
j turning to Montana confirmed boost
j ers for Wyoming scenery,
j They report great interest in Mont-
I ana for the Park to Park highawy
wh : ch passes thru their town avd if
all the raod boosters are of their type
the road wil be successfully com
pleted.
HOW SITUATION MUST~BE MET
The Editor and Publisher says: A
year ago the Virginia publisher wa3
paying from two to two and three
fourth cents per pound for his news
print, according to the amount of his
yearly purchase. Today it is impos
sible to make a contract and the price
ranpes from four to six cents per
pound for immediate delivery.”
The same condition is existing all
over the country and the situation is
being investigated by the Federal
Trade commission.
Some papers will not survive the
strain, others will learn lessons that
will help place the business on a sound
footing.
Perhaps the present crisis is one of
those ill winds that will bring good
to the publishers.
The penny paper will go.
The free space to all organizations
which use the papers in order to
save postage or work, will be clicin
ated.
Publishers will collect for all papers
sent out.
The merchant does not give away
a paper of pins because the amount
involved is small.
The newspaper mush be placed on
the same careful business basis.
I The Thermopolis band has been en
gaged to furnish music for the state
fair.
The Old
First National Bank
Growing! Growing! Growing!
aija AAA To Loan on Good Securities. We
«p I UjUUu are here to be of service to the
community.
Bring us your banking business; we will make
it worth the while.
L. R. EWART F. F. MctiEE,
PrnMeni Cashier
Cattle For Sale
We have in our lease near Cody several hundred head of cattle
for sale. Consisting of steers and heifers. Also several good bull.
Either cash or time will suit us.
RICHARDS & COMSTOCK
NORTIIERN HOTEL. BILLINGS, MONTANA
Century Building, DENVER. COLO.
Ranches in See our representative
Nebraska. Wyoming John T. Murray,
and Montana Irma Hotel. Cody. Wyoming
Shoshone Notional Bank
Cody, Wyoming
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
OFFICERS A,M» DIRECTORS:
S. W. Al*«k
S. C. PARKS, Jr., Pre*!4eat () t J. J t>ll
C. L BRADY, CiAui Dirtriwi; 5. C. P»rfc*. Jr.
R. A. EDMISTF.R, Auiitut CaibW C. L. Br>4;
S. Cmml Part*
twry facility caamteat with aaaad Una mg practice i* aMcr»4 ky tkia Uak ta it,
cat laser* «*d g—i tccnaatt arc talkiic* apaa tku Utit
U. S. Land Office
H. W. THURSTON
U. S. Commissioner
LAND MATTERS A SPECIALTY
Old U. G. Lantry Office
WHY THIS STORE
Purity of Drugs.
Accurate Perscriptions.
Best of Toilet Articles.
Latest Souvenirs.
Durable Rubber Goods.
Newest Stationery.
Tasteful Confections.
Quality Smokes.
Best Pip es and Tobaccos.
Magazines-Your Choice.
Exclusive Edison and Victor Agency.
Prompt and Efficient Service.
ECONOMY IN PRICE
THAT’S WHY
Harding Curio & Drug Company
FRIDAY, AUGUST It I*l*.

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