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The Northern Wyoming herald. (Cody, Wyo.) 1916-1924, September 29, 1916, Image 7

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FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 29, 1916.
Dr. C. L. Gilliam
SURGEON
Well Equipped Hospital
for the care of Surgical
Cases
Cody, Wyoming
FLATHEAD VALLEY B. C. OIL CO.
Capital $300,000.,
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON
F. LENS, M. A. R. D. E.
(Member Association Royal Dutch Mining Engineers)
Director and Representative
Cody Office, Walls Buldtag, Cody, Wyoming.
Shoshone National Bank
Cody, Wyoming
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:
S. W. AWrkl
S. C. PARKS, Jr., Preside®! D, J. Jooea
C. L. BRADY, Cukiw Directors: S. G. Parks, Jr.
R. A. EDWISTER, Assistant Caskia C. L. Brady
S. Comaat Parks
Ersry facility caasistcat with soaad kaaftiag practice is offered by this baak la it,
cndofficrs aad good accoaats are solicited apoa this basis
Cody Flour & Feed Store
C. E. HAYDEN, Proprietor
Auto Delivery Phone 47w

Just received a car of stock salt in sacks
and sulpherized blocks. Also table salts.
Bran-Bran & Shorts-Shorts. Oats
*
Wheat and Hay.
Don’t Forget
“WE SELL FOR CASH”
A I SAFETY FIRST !■ a, s
When you are in Omaha come where all Stockmen stop. You
will always find your friends and acquaintances at the
HOTEL CASTLE
16th AND JONES STS.. OMAHA.
Omara’s new absolutely fire proof hotel. We welcome the
stockmen. We’ll make you comfortable and our rates are most re
sonable in the city. Rooms with private bath, $1.50 to $1.75.
Rooms with private toilet SI.OO. Good car service to the Stock
ards ami Depots. Have your commission firm telephone for room
reservation. FRED A. CASTLE, Prop.
COMFORT WITHOUT EXTRAVAGANCE
The Old
First Notional Bank
of Cody
is not excelled for safety and service. We believe in
the redering of service that will tend to upbuild the
community. We believe in the charity of human na
ture and the integrity of men.
Your associations with this bank will rebound to
your advantage.
L. R. EWART . F. F. McdEE,
President Cashier
NORTHERN WYOMING HKBAT.n
BAPTISED AND BURIED
If a Chicken Dies Shall It Live A
gain? Asks Albert Felaheim of
the Standard
Did you ever dip a chicken?
The general order for dipping of
sheep which is being enforced in Wyo
ming gave the Felsheims the idea
that the same thing would be good
for the some three hundred chickens
which awaited orders of customers
at the Standard Restaurant.
“Schure dip dem hinunter,” sagte
j der vater, as he examined the hens
| closely and made a discovery.
Albert, the younger, purchased am
ple quantities of dip, following direc
tions explicitly put in seventy parts
water.
A big nice vat was procured and a
nice warm bath with ample disen
fectants awaited the birds. John, the
elder, grabbed chsickens by the hand
ful and douced them under.
He immerced them by the good old
Baptist method but without ceremony
and the chickens seemed to enjoy it
for when they came out from under
they were indifferent to what was go
ing on.
In fact, animation was suspended.
“Vas ist los?” asked the junior.
“Nichts, aber a funeral now,” said
the senior Felsheim and proceeded at;
once to dig a trench to bury half thej
feathered tribe for the process had!
progressed so rapidly and with such ;
flutterings of wings before the oper
ation that the men didn’t notice at
first the indisposition and lack of in
terest the baptised ones took in life.
Before the task was completed Al
bert noticed a “dead” chicken stretch
a wing and raise its head. He watch
ed her closely and in a minute it got
up and ran off.
“Let's have a resurection, dad,”
said Albert starting to uncover the
birds.
“Vas ist, bist du crazy?”
The first one was alive and as the
dirt was pulled off their backs the rest 1
of the birds shook themselves and ran
off.
Perfectly sanitary hens are served,
at the Standard. i
0
\ NOT AN EIGHT-HOUR LAW. Z
$ Recent Hold-Up Legislation Does J |
> Not Shorten Workday a J
} Minute. J
If Z|
5 Ax a matter of fact, it Is not $
!; an eight-hour law at all. It does J
i !; not curtail tin* trainmen's work- } ;
![ day by a single minute. If an $
'! engineer has been receiving $5 * j
;j for working ten hours a day, this Z
• i law will raise his pay to $0.25; Z j
hut it will not shorten his work- Z
; ; clay even the tenth part of a sec- Z
ond. This is no more like the % .
; true* eight-hour principle than 5
chalk is like cheese. Z
The reason why people call J
!; this an eight-hour law is he- J
| cause it says that in the case J
of railroad trainmen they shall J
gel their day’s pay for the first j
eight hours’ work, and all the*
'! rest is to be considered over- £ 1
I time. $
;» Do not tell me that this strike Z •
;» could not have been called off or Z
postponed if President Wilson Z
!; hud shown that lie meant husi- |
J; ness. I do not for one minute %
believe that those four brother- Z
hood leaders started tin* blaze Z
!; going without knowing how to Z
![ put it out. One of them ad- J
!; initted that lie could put it out ?
so far us his own brotherhood 5
!; was concerned, hut that his fol- $
lowers would think that he had z
!; gone hack on them if 110 were 5
'! to do so. —Statement of Con- i
'! gressmnu A. I*. Gardner. *
The least that may he said of Presi
dent Wilson is that lie lias been right
half the time, for In* lias been tin both
sides of almost all important ques
tions.
It’s not to he wondered that Thom
as A. Edison favors Wilson's re-elec
tion. The electrical wizard naturally
likes any thing that switches on and
off.
Z HUGHES ON REUNITED Z
* PARTY. £
Z “I come to you as the spokes- Z
} man of a reunited party. We »
5 have said that it was reunited: {
we have believed it was re- <
{ united; we have devoutly hoped *
!* it was reunited. Now, Maine \
proves that it is reunited. I am J
glad to speak for the reunited J
Republican party because it is a {
B-ted as 1
trad!- 2
party. I
future 2
lutlook :
Irit.”— i
Speech I
Y. t
MOVES BACK TO CODY
Dick Rousseau and family have
moved back to Cody from Powell and
the children have entered school. Mr.
Rousseau has the cement contract for
the Lakcview canal company and will
be employed for some time in com
pleting that work.
Need A Stove?
We Sell ’Em
Have you examined those heaters to see
if they will go through the coming winter?
Or perhaps they are old style and out of
date. You can’t get the maximum of heat
if this is the case.
We Handle the Very Latest in Stoves
We can sell you a stove or range that
will give you the most possible heat with
the least possible fuel. And they are
beauties. Come and see them.
Monarch Malleable Round Oak Heaters
Range Sure to Please
s ’ PiFt BRUNDAGE HARDWARE We OtJ " s, °"
5..„ Board, The Store Re,.:,,
FLEETING PROSPERITY ,
j IS FOOL’S PARADISE
1
Don’t Let Smoke From Munition
Factories Cloud Your Brain
With Belief It’s Abiding.
6.
PROTECTION, OUR BULWARK
J
Forget Not \he Dire Conditions Which
Depressed This Country Under the
Democratic Free Trade Tariff
Prior to the War—They Will Re
turn to Plague and Hunger You
Unless the Are Re- ■ 1
stored to Power.
“When we contemplate industrial •
and commercial conditions.” says Mr.
Hughes, “we see that we are living
in a fool’s paradise.” This is the con
dition to which tiie administration and
iti? supporters have deliberately closed
their eyes. When the war cloud broke
over Europe, this country was experi
encing the most serious depression it
had known since 1893, when the Demo- I
emtio party and its policies were in
full coutrol of the United States.
Suddenly there came from over tin
sea a demand for munitions of war.
clothing, food, supplies, everything
needed by vast armies and by coun
tries whose sons were taken from tin
lield and the workshop, never to re
turn.
As a result our exports and the bal
ance of trade in our favor have reach 1
**d figures far surpassing any ever he
fore known. Temporarily, especially In |
the East, there is no lack of work ai
high wages, for Europe must pa>
whatever price America asks. N.
* I
thoughtful person would Imagine that 1
this condition is anything like real 1
prosperity. How false it is. we In s
Oregon, who have tin* clearer vision
because not clouded by the sinoki 1
from munitions factories, hav# fully |
felt and fully appreciated.
What the Republican candidate foi
president says about it the Democrats
know to he true:
“Our opponents promised to reduci 1
the cost of living. This they hav< 5
failed to do. hut did reduce the oppor- 1
tunities of making a living. Let us ;
not forget the conditions that existed ,
in this country under the new tarifi ,
prior to the war. Production had de- ,
creased; business was languishing:
new enterprises were not undertaken;
instead of expansion there was cur
tailuient and our streets were tilled
with tlie unemployed.”
The suspension of these conditions
Is not nation-wide, only sectional, and
depends upon the duration of the war
Those who think otherwise are. in
deed, living In a fool’s paradise.—Port ,
laud (Ore.) Telegr /
0 «
GREYBULL BABY BURNED
Tho eight months old baby boy of
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Casey, living
three miles north of Greybull, was
■ burned on Thursday of last week so
badly that it died a couple of hours
• afterwards. The little boys dress
' caught fire from some grass which a
I eight year old brother had set afire
while the parents were away from the
house looking after some stock.
OBJECT TO SHEEP SALE
Herder Sells Sheep Without Authority
at Low Price and Owners
Refuse to Confirm
Just who own 480 head of wethers
now* in the possession of Ganguet &
Barth of the Allison ranch is a ques-*
tion that is bothering a few and in*
fact several.
It appears that these sheep up to
the time of the opening chapter of
this story were owned by A. J. Aagard
of Fountain Green, Utah, and were
run with Henry Griffen's band. The
Aagard’s have a ranch at Burlington
and employed thereon is one Peter
Hansen. j
Mr. Hansen was instructed to cut
out the wethers and ship them to
Omaha and according to Henry Griffen
the band was divided and Hansen
started for the railroad at Cody.
Unforseen difficulties loomed up.
large before Hansen upon his arrival
for the embargo was on pending the
settlement of the railroad strike then
in prospect and Hansen was at a loss
to know' what to do with the sheep.
He didn’t want them. The railroad
wouldn’t take them. What was the
, poor man to do?
The next chapter opens with Gang
uet. the big broad shouldered French
man of the Allison ranch, who made
an offer of So a head for the sheep
and Hansen accepted his check in
payment.
This seemed to close the story for
the first mail out carried the check
to the owner. A. J. Aagard of Utah
and the employee returned to the
Burlington ranch and again took up
his usual round of duties.
Saturday a telegram came from
Utah refusing to accept the check in
payment of the animals and instruct
ing the hired man to recover posses
sion of the sheep.
The next chapter is in process of
formation and must needs be told at a
later date.
EDITOR IS INJURED
John H. Harris of the Greybull
Standard has gone to Thermopolis in
the endeavor to recover from injuries
received a couple of months ago when
a car in which he was riding ran off
a bridge on the Shell creek road. The
accident was due to had road condi
tions and resulted unfortunately for
the Standard editor, one of the best
boosters in the Bighorn Basin.
o
BUY $35,000 LAMBS
Smith, Orville and Marvin Murray
purchased $35,000 worth of lambs in
this section and last week shipped
twenty-two cars to Kewanee where
they will feed. Last season these men
purchased lambs here and cleared $2
a head on them and they expect to do
equally as well with this lot of the
Hargrave ewes. W. G. Robson of
Scranton, lowa, was also a purchaser
and shipped four cars.
SINGLE TRACKS AND RAILROAD
TRACKS
We respectfully submit that the
“singe-track mind” has no right of
way over double-track and four-track
• railroads.
A CONTEST OF CHARACTER,
NOT OF WEASEL WORDS
;
CARDINAL QUESTION IN THIS
CAMPAIGN IS WHETHER THE
PEOPLE WANT IN THE WHITE
HOUSE A PHRASE-MAKER,
OR A MAN WHO BACKS
J WORDS WITH DEEDS,
1 Woodrow Wilson excels In the at 4 -*
ti*itry of politics beyond the capacity
> of (’buries Evans Hughes to compete.
Were the current campaign a game of
l professional politics iusteud of a cou
, test of character between two candi
» dates for the highest office in the gift
) of the people. Mr. Wilson would walk
away with the prize next November.
All his life he has made a study of
form—first of literary form—and lut-‘
- terly of political form. Ifi the first
> period lie mastered a style peculiarly
1 his own, and peculiarly characteristic.
, The study of words and their multi
plicity of meaning always fascinates
? him, so much that a Princeton class
mate recently said of him: “Tommy
lias lived with words so long he thinks*
f they are real things.” Thence comes
1 his collection of what Theodore House
: velt’s Maine Guide calls “weusel
words.” That is—“he can take a
I word and weasel it around and suck*
, the meaning out of it like a weasel
sucks an egg, until it don’t mean any
thing at all, no matter what it
sounds like it means.” Thence came
also the series of catch phrases, so
’ fascinating in sound, so false in sug
-1 gestion; so easy to read, so hard to un
derstand. So it is that lie is able to
be on all sides of every public ques
tion, while covering his circuitous
course with a How of words that roll
as easily from his pen as u brook
through the meadow. It is his artful
ness in the use of words that enables
him to pose as “an amateur in poli
ties,” while playing the game with the
-'kill of a professional. Whatever his
ineptitude in other respects, he is eas
ily first among presidents in the art
istic of politics, and he would win
next November, were that the test.
Compare the wiliuess of Mr. Wilson
with tile straightforwardness of Mr.
Hughes. Compare the smooth style of
the one with the rugged diction of the
other. The one is as complex in the
use of words as the other is simple.
It is a case of sonorousness versus
strength. Mr. Hughes is depending
upon tlie strategy of siraightforward
ness and the strength of sincerity;
upon the force of facts, instead of up
’ «»tt the fiction of a phrase, to win his
, case before the jury of the nation.
His appeal is to the head and not the
ear of the people; to their intelli
gence and not to their emotion; to
their heroic side and not to their hys
terical side. It is an appeal to the
courage of the country and not to its
cowardice. Mr. Hughes could not, if
lie would, perform in a year the po
( litieal tricks that Mr. Wilson can do
■ in a day. The question today is
whether the people want in the White
1 louse for the next four years a
1 phrase-maker or a history-maker; a
■ man of many sayings, or a man who
> hacks his words with deeds. There
i is a fundamental difference between
? the two candidates, which marks the
. line of cleavage in this extraordinary
campaign—“ Hughes means what he
su ys>.”
» 0
WHO ARE HUMANITY?
; Does the President's definition of
f humanity include American women
; and children traveling on the high
seas or our regulars at the front.
PAGE SEVEN

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