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Imperial press and farmer. (Imperial, San Diego County, Cal.) 1901-1903, November 30, 1901, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92070142/1901-11-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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Imperial Press
AND FARMER.
VOL 1.
IMPERIAL WATER COMPANIES.
MUTUAL WATER COMPANIES ABSOLUTELY CONTROLLED
BY LAND OWNERS.
PARENT COMPANIES FURNISH WATER TO MUTUAL COMPANIES
UNDER PERPETUAL CONTRACT AT STIPULATED PRfCE
THAT CANNOT BE CHANGED.
A correspondent writes for infor
mation relative to the various water
companies in the Imperial Settlements.
He seems to think that some of the
water companies are selling water to
consumers and by relying on another
water company for the water, that
there is a chance for a. cinch game.
So long as any one thinks that there
is an opportunity to get hurt in pur
chasing land and water stock, it is
better to so state, and seek to have
matters explained.
LOCATION OF THE PERMANENT HEADING OK THE IMPERIAL CANAL SYSTEM ON THE COLORADO RIVER, ONR MILE ABOVE THE
TEMPORARY HEADING NOW BEING USED.
There is one large water company
— the California Development Com
pany—which owns the water right
from the Colorado River and owns, in
connection with a subsidiary Mexican
Company, the canal that conducts the
water from that river for a distance
of about sixty miles to the lands to
be irrigated.
Said companies cannot distribute
the water in a satisfactory manner to
the thousands of people who will own
800,000 acres of land to be irrigated.
The machinery for such distribution
"Water is King— Here is its Kingdom.' "
IMPERIAL, CAL, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1901.
would be too cumbersome and the re
sult would not be satisfactory to the
users of water.
Again, if said companies were to
undertake that work, the people them
selves — the users of the water —
would have no voice in the distribu
tion or management of the system, for
they have no stock in such com
panies; they are not formed on the
mutual plan, and there would always
be a contest between the people and
the companies as to how the work
should be done and how much should
be charged for the services.
So far as any one individual or
tract of land is concerned, there are
but two water" companies— the Califor
nia Development Company which con
structs and owns the main system in
connection with the Mexican Com
pany, and his own Mutual Water
Company of which he is a stockholder
and which Mutual Water Company
purchases from the California Devel
opment Company and the Mexican
Company under a contract — perpet
ual in character — whereby his Mutual
Water Company is enabled to get all
the water it wants for all time to
come, for the fixed price of fifty cents
per acre foot which is equal to about
two cents per inch for a tweny-four
hours' flow.
This Mutual Water Company — Im
perial Water Company No. 1, for in
stance — is simply a combination of
the land owners under the laws of the
State of California, which enables
them to own and control their own
distributing system of canals and
ditches, and distribute their own
water — bought under contract from
the California Development Company
— to their own stockholders and to
no one else, in their own way. If
therefore, the distribution is not sat
isfactory, or if the distributing sys
tem of canals and ditches is not kept
in proper shape, then they have no
one to blame but their own officials
who can be easily removed and others
put in their places.
It would be a business and financial
impossibility to form one Mutual
Water Company that should go to the
Colorado river and construct one sys
tem to irrigate 500,000 acres of land
in California and 300,000 acres in
Lower California. The system could
not be built on that plan and no one
would take stock in a corporation hav
ing so many stock holders with the
responsibility of the stock reaching to
the Colorado river 150 miles, from
some of the lands to be eventually
irrigated.
It is true that there are several
corporations connected with this en
terprise, but each land owner after he
has purchased his water stock and
paid for it, only has to deal with the
one corporation — his own Mutual
Water Company — and that Mutual
Water Company has to deal as a cor
poration with the California Develop
ment Company to the extent of tak
ing from that Company what water
it needai under terms already per
manently fixed by contract and then
paying that Company for such water
on t-*e first days of January and July
of each year.
All other corporations can be
brushed to one side as being of no in-
terest to the land owner after he has
purchased and paid for his water
stock.
This system is not only the most
complete to be found in the State of
California and the most simple from
the water users' point of view, but
it is the only system that can be used
under the conditions as they exist in
that locality under California laws
that would be at all satisfactory to
the land owners.
The founders of this system have
spent many years in actual work in
No. 33.

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