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Imperial press and farmer. (Imperial, San Diego County, Cal.) 1901-1903, March 29, 1902, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92070142/1902-03-29/ed-1/seq-9/

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Imperial Lands Indorsed.
D. (1. Whiting writes the Callfornln
Cultivator that ho ha* great faith In
tho Imperial country, and that the
fanners there laugh nt the dire predic
tion* of tho government expert as to
tho prevalence of alkali In quantities
that will prevent tho growing of farm
crops. Tho finest crops are growing
now near tho town of Imperial. This
portion of tho tract was marked on the
government map as tho most unlikely
portion of tho territory. If that part
Is producing well there Is no doubt
whatever of the adaptability of tho
soil In tho vicinity of the lakes.
When successful farmers Ilko Mr.
Whiting speak well of these lands,
without any interest In anything but
his own farm, the future of that coun
try Is assured. Ono who may wish to
Invest In new lauds to farm under un
tried conditions, should first thoroughly
canvass the matter, but should not be
discouraged In advance by adverse re
ports. In portions of tho hullo lands
most abounding In salts I saw tho
finest crops growing last summer. The
foreign element had been carried away
by the Irrigating water. Southern Cali
fornia needs such a tract of land as
the Now River country to furnish for
ago for the working stock, and we hope
tho farmers who are developing the
now lands may not be deceived in the
qualities they arc now finding so re
assuring.
Another Railroad Through Imperial.
Win. H. Carlson, ex-mayor of San
Diego, is sanguine that the railroad
from San Diego to Yuma, being pro
moted by him, will surely be built.
T..»? Los Angeles Express publishes
the following as a result of an Inter
view: .
W. H. Carlson, ex-mayor of Snn
Diego. Is in tho city in the interest
of h!o long-loved project of a rail
road lino from San Diego to Yuma.
This time, he says, the scheme Is
bound to go through.
"Wealthy bankers of New York who
have confidence in me arc willing <o
advance the monoy required to build
'♦--: road and to run their chance of
selling out to one of the great tranr
continental companies after the cou
noction Is complete," says Mr. Carl
son. "Tho Imperial colony Is helping
the proposition along, for It is ap
parent that the developm-sui of the
vast holdings of that corporation will
be productive of freight that will give
earning capacity to the road.
"The road is to be 175 miles in
length. It will cost $3,500,000 and the
money is available for the work.
Construction will begin at Yuma and
proceed westward by way of the Im
perial colony lands. I have retained
my franchises from the Mexican gov
ernment and terminal facilities at San
Diego await our use. The great Irri
gation enterprise at Imperial is a suc
cess. Tho territory occupied by the
colony will make railroading profit
able through what was once tho great
Colorado Desert. With harbor facili
ties at the western terminus and di
rect eastern connections the ultimate
purchase of our property for incorpor
ation with some large railway system
headed toward tho Pacific Coast is a
matter only of a few years."
Mr. Carlson went from San Diego
to Washington several years ago.
When the war with Spain was ended
he was appointed railway commis
sioner for the government in Cuba. In
thut capacity he formed a wldo ac
quaintance with moneyed men and
with those who are looking for favor
able openings for railway building in
this country. Ills personal energy
and tho merit of his pot project won
their hearts and it Is believed that he
Is not over-sanguine In thinking that
tho road will bo built.
"Gates Ajar."
Undor tho abovo caption tho Ala
meda Kncinnl gives an account of
how Mrs. Gates obtained a dlvorco
from Mr. Gates for cause. Wouldn't
that heading Jar you?
An expert's View of Imperial lands.
Hon. H. C. Power*, ox-Oovirnor of
Ail/onii, having vlnlf'tl Impfrlnl,
write n tin following mi hln opinion of
Itfi fut tiro:
Editor liujmtlml I'reim — After riding
over tho country embraced undnr tho
Impfrlnl Canal Hyfttcm ami hnvlng
find over twenty years' experience?
with and obnorvntlon of the Irrigated
portion* of Now Mexico, Arizona and
California, I am free to nay that I
know of no section of equal extent
with fncllltien for an abundant water
fiipitly that lit equal to thlft portion of
California. Tho depth and fertility of
the alluvial boII deposited by tho over*
flown of tho Colorado Klver, and em
braced under thin canal system is tin*
mirpuHHi-d. I nm sure, by any area of
like extent In Arid America.
Tho lands are specially adapted to
the growth of alfalfa and other for
age crops, and I .predict for this sec
tion great success as a stock country.
The ratio of alkali contained In the
soil Is not materially greater than la
found In other alluvial lands that have
been succeHSttilly cultivated in other
portions of tho Arid West, while this
section has the advantage over all
others with which I am familiar, In
not having a hard-pan sub-soil to hold
tho alkali and return it by capillary
attraction to the surface.
Upon the whole I do not hesitate
to recommend the Imperial country as
a safe and profitable place for invest
ments and liomi'».
H. C. POWERS.
Some men arc so Intent on build-
Ing up a good reputation that they
neglect to build up character.
A DON'T GIVE UP A DOLLAR
'/YM&3SLj&R \U^ ®* your mone * r unt^ y° u are thoroughly convinced that what you are
jg^^^L^Mg^ j^r"'^gHßBß getting in exchange for it is the best value obtainable.
WE MANUFACTURE
Tents, Awnings, Wagon Covers, Ore Sacks
I And everything in the canvas goods line. Oar name is sewed on every piece, which is equivalent to any
| guarantee; we are always a little ahead in quality and a little behind in price.
WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY ON
BEDDING, CAMP FURNITURE, RUBBER AND
LEATHER BOOTS AND OILED CLOTHING
Or in fact anything in Sporting Goods. MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
WM. H. HOEGEE CO.
! 138-142 South Main St. LOS ANGELES, CAL.
UNION HARDWARE METAL. CO.
JOBBERS AND IMPORTERS OF
TINWARE, GALVANIZED WARE, GRANITE
WARE AND JAPANNED WARE
MINING AND RAILROAD SUPPLIES, BUILDERS' AND SHELF HARDWARE,
WAGON AND CARRIAGE HARDWARE
Union Hardware and Metal Co.
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
IMPERIAL PRKSS
Peculiar Names.
Tho Pacific Coast has boon prolific
In giving peculiar names to news-
Home years ago the town of Tomb
stone In Arizona gave* birth to a new
paper which was chrlstoned Tho
Tombstone Kpltaph.
About that same time tho town of
Calico— a mining town In San Ber
nardino County — out on tho desert —
wanted a paper and It was called
Tho Calico Print. This paper, Ilko
tho Epitaph, went down with the
town as tho mines wore closed.
Tho Needle* Kyo still winks and
never has yet doted to go to sleep
on the banks of tho Colorado River
where the Santa Fo Railroad crosses
that stream.
Others have had equally eccentric
names but they do not occur to the
writer just now.
Hut the latest paper to be placed
In this list is the new candidate for
public favor at the town of Indio.
this paper, being published twenty
feet below sea level, where old ocean's
waves rolled In ages long gone by, was
very appropriately named The Sub
marine.
The Imperial Press is published at
the lowest level of any paper in the
United States — if not in the world —
74 feet below sea level. If there is
another paper published at a lower
level we would be pleased to receive
it as an exchange.
Tho firm of Dig & I)olvr» rlcctArM
cUfldfnd* whll#» th*» firm of Guoui it
Hklm In ronferiin* with It* receiver.
Telephone |
Comrapaiiniy \
o
Offices at 0
IMPERIAL i
CALEXICO d
FLOWINQWELL \
IRIS 0
ni<SsAOns SENT TO OR A
Receiveo PRon any part X
OP THE WORLD \
Telephones v
For Rent $
9

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