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Western liberal. (Lordsburg, N.M.) 1887-1919, October 31, 1913, Image 1

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Historical Society
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VOL. XXVI. NO. -0
LORDSBURG, NEW MEXICO. OCTOBER 31, 1913.
9abrtption98 PrTV
Sing lCopl10ont
WESTERN LIBERAL.
tjerdsbare:
Maw Mexico.
PUBLISHED FRIDAYS.
Entered at the Pott Offloe at Lnrdsburg at
Beoond Claia Hall Matter.
By DOW i H. KKDEIK.
Subscription Fricos.
Three Month '. ....1100
Biz Months 1 Í8
OneTear : (00
Subscription Alwave Pavanlnl n Advanoe,
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
STATE
Wm. C. M oDonald Goromor
B. C. da Baoa Lieutenant Governor
Antonio Luoero, Secretary of State
V. W. Clancy Attorney-Qeueral
W. U. Sargent Auditor
Howell Ernott Traveling Auditor
O. N. Marrón Treasurer
K. P. Ervlen... . Commissioner Publlo Lands
Allan N. White Supt. Publlo Instruction
Hugh H. Williams, Chn. Corp. Com
M. B. O roves ' ,,
O. L. Owen ., ,.
Chicanes J. Hoberta, Chief Justloe 8up. Court
Hlchard H. Hanna, ,,
Frank W. Parker, ,, .,
J, D.Sena Clerk
COUNTY.
Van T. Manville, .... Commissioner 1st District
K, B. Ed wardt 2nd
B. D. Ownbjr 8rd
H. J. MoQrath Sheriff
M.F. Downs, Treasurer
James A. abljrlny Assessor
Uym.n Abrahams Probate Judie
E. B. Tenable County Clerk
Isabella Eokles,.... Superintendent of Sohools
F. L. Cox.... Surveyor
FEDERAL-
Georg-e Curry,. Member Congress
H. B. Fergusson
W H. Hope Judge Dlstrlot Court
Harry Lee, ..Clerk ,
8. B Davis. United States Attorney
C. M. Forsker U.S. Marshal
John W. M arch SurreVor-Oeneral
Hsry t. Bardshar.... Internal Bev. Collector
PRE0IH0T.
M. W. MoQrath Justioe of the Peace
O, Allen Constabk
School Dtreetore B.-W Kaodall. J, U. Mo-
Clure, J. K. Ownby.
Southern Pacific R. R.
Lerdsbure Time Table.
WSRTBOITND.
A.M. A.M. A.M. P.M.
Passenger :K6 1U:6T ll:U 8:14
A8TBOUND
A.M. A.M. A.M. P. M
Passenger 1:47 8:12 10:30 3:16
Trains raa on Mountain Time.
E B. Calvin. H.V.Pi.att,
Quneral Manager. General Superintendent,
U.K. kiohahdsoh, Bupt. orxmnspi.
J. H. Dyer, O. L. Dickey,
Superintendent, Asst. Superintendent
Arizona & New Mex
ico Railway
BOHTHIODHD
P. M
Kaohlta 11:80
liordtburg 12:(W
Dunoau n.iu
ailfton.... 8:3o
ODiaBODBO
3llfton o':fi
Ouncan 8:19
Lordsburg fl-afi
Haohlta 10:45
Trains run dallr. Mountain time.
HI. M. CROCKER, M. D.
Pbyslelaa and 8nrgeon,
District Burgenn Southern Paclfla and AH.
aona New Mexico Railroads, Surgeon to
muHwui vuusuiMiaiea copper to.
TjORDSBUBO
Nsw Mbxioo.
TOM TONG & CO.
THJB NEW
BRICK RESTAURANT
Table supplied with the best in the
Market Everything neat and clean
Isoi & ffldtn
jiUtorneys at Law
SILVER CITY, NEW MEX.
Will make regular visits to Lordsburg, N. M.
Probate, Judicial, Surlty,
Employes, OQicial
U. S. Fidelity and Guaranty Co.
Buy your bonds instead of
calling on friends who may not
want to sign a bond.
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8 d.k.k:edzie
8 BONDS 8
aoooecf
r
HUTS AND HATS.
Man' Headgear Waa Firat Fashioned
After His Habitation.
It has been pointed cot that the
form of the hat bears a certain rela
tion to buildings of a primitive nature
huts. A dlatlngnlabed architect haa
Invited attention to the curious re
semblance that has ex luted and that is
till to be found In many countries be
tween headgear and habitations or
other buildings. It may be that the
same taste, or the lack of it, baa given
rlne to the similarity of style, or In
the beginning the designer of the bat
may have taken the hut as a model.
In the Hawaiian Islands, long before
the inhabitants took the trouble to
clothe themselves, they built grasa
bouses, and at the present time the
characteristic Hawaiian hat is remark
ably like the hut
The turbans of the dignitaries of the
eastern church are still of the shape of
those worn by the high priests among
the Jews of olden times, and they are
extraordinarily like the characteristic
domes that surmount mosqnes. Again,
it Is pointed out, the high pointed
spires of Gothic churches were con
temporaneous with the high hornlike
headdress known as the hennln.
It Is beilved. too, that like reunite
may be found after a comparison of
other styles of archltectuure with the
heádgcar of the period wherein they
flourished. Harper's Weekly.
GOOD LUCK IN A POSE.
Aooidental 8uooss Won Through
Gladstone Photograph.
"In literature," said a publisher,
"popular success frequently comes by
accident A remarkable case was that
of J. H. Shorthouse. This man, poor
chemist, spent some years writing a
book called 'John Inglesant' But the
publishers would have none of 'John
Inglesant.' and Anally Mr. Shorthouse
printed 100 copies at his own expense,
"Only forty of these copies sold, one
purchaser being photographer. The
photographer took Mr. Gladstone's pic
ture some weeks later, and the old
man chose a studious pose, sitting with
a volume in his hand. He bent in
absorption over the work, which hap
pened accidentally to be 'John Ingle
sant,' and in the thousands of copies
of the photograph that were sold the
book's name was plainly to be made
out
"Mr. Gladstone was regarded aa a
great critic, and the people thought
be desired to recommend 'John Ingle
sant' What was the result? Within
the year 300,000 coplea of 'John Ingle
sant had been sold, and Shorthouse
was a made man."
Asasslz and the Girle.
Concerning Louis Agasnlz, naturalist
when a professor at Harvard, this
story is told by James Kendall Hoe
mer In his "The Last Leaf:" "As he
strode homeward from his walks In
the outer fields or marahes we eyed
him gingerly, for who could tell what
he might have in his pockets T Turtles,
tadpoles, snakes, any old monster,
might be there. He was on the friend
liest terms with things 111 reputed,
even abhorrent and could not under
stand the qualms of the delicate. He
was said to have held up once in all
Innocence, before a class of school
girls, a wriggling snake. The shrieks
and confusion brought him to a sense
of what he had done. He apologized
elaborately, the foreign peculiarity he
never lost running through bis con
fusion. 'Poor girls, I vUl not do it
again. Next time I Till bring In a
nice, clean leetle feesh.' Agassis took
no pleasure in shocking his class. On
the contrary, he was most anxious to
engage and hold them."
The Unsociable Little Fellow.
At dinner during a voyage to Cor
sica, to which my father invited the
passengers who included some officers
of his regiment and two Corslcana.
he requested an officer, M. de Belloc.
to call a young man who waa wearing
the uniform of the military school and
reading at the end of the boat The
young man refused. M. de Belloc
csme back irritated and said to my
father: "I ahould like to throw the
unsociable little fellow into the aea.
He has an unpleasant face. Will you
grant me permission, colonel?"
"No," said my father, laughing,
"and I am not of your opinion. His
face shows character, and I am sure
that be will be heard of some day."
The unsociable fellow waa the future
Emperor Napoleon. From Memoirs of
Comtesse de Bolgne.
Ths Roaetta Stone.
The Rosetta stone waa found In 1700
by a French enslneer officer In an ex.
cavation made near Rosetta. It lias
an inscription In three different lañ
aría aes. the bieroslVDhlf. th rlamnrto
and the Greek. It was erected 105
B. O. In honor of Ptolemy Eplpbanes
because he remitted the dua of thm
priestly body. The great value of the
Kosetta atone lies In the fact that It
furnished the key whereby the Egyp
tian hieroglyphics were deciphered.
. Woman's Wiles. -"What
hold Matid seems to have on
all her rejected suitors."
Why shouldn't the. the artful thin!
She always tells k man when ahe ra
fuses blm that she U) afraid to marry a
liandsouie man became abe would ha
so Jealous." Cincinnati Enquirer,
clnnai
MYSTERY OF THE PLAGUE.
How and Why Did It Disappear From
England In 1847?
Why did the plague disappear from
England? Mr. Bernard Shaw Inci
dentally asks this deeply interesting
question in a letter to the Nation, and
we cannot say that we are satisfied
with his answer. He says he "knows"
that plague haa been "extirpated" by
"common sanitation."
Until the recent sporadic Imported
tases, the last recorded cases of plague
In England occurred at Nottingham in
10(17. In that year plague vanished ut
terly from England for two and a half
centuries. No one who has examined
the records of the seventeenth century
can believe that It waa "extirpated" by
sanitation. Very gradually In tbe suc
ceeding century and a half plague
withdrew from Europe also.
Tbe date of its disappearance from
Constantinople has been fixed at about
tbe year 1841. It remained endemic
only In a few lonely places In the
world, such as tbe highlands of west
ern Arabia, Yunnan in China and Mes
opotamia. Sanitation, though an ex
cellent palliative, certainly never drove
the plague from Stamboul and Cairo
and the southern Mediterranean, any
more than it did from England.
Tbe shrinkage of plague is as great
mystery as the recent outburst which
Infected the whole world. Perhaps the
explanation is that In a few years bac
teria may go through tbe myriad trans
forming processes of evolution which
in the case of humanity take eons to
complete. Pan Mall G aserto.
HIS VISIT TO MORGAN.
There Waant Muoh Said, but It Waa
All Right to the Point.
A well known Insurance official said
tbe other day at the Auditorium, in
Chicago:
"In the beginning of my career, when
I was only a humble insurance agent i
gained access one morning to the au
gust and formidable presence of J.
Plerpont Morgan."
"No!" :
"Tes," the official Insisted "yea, ire
a fact Don't ask me how I did It
though, for that's a secret But at 10
o'clock one morning behold me. a
young Insurance agent standing be
fore tbe desk of tbe great J. Plerpont
with my big envelope of life and death
statistics, twenty year endowments,
and so forth, in my hand. I waa, I
have aluce learned, the first and only
insurance agent who ever managed to
meet Mr. Morgan face to face."
"Well, what happened?"
" 'Mr. Morgan,' I began hurriedly,
'you ought to carry more life Insurance.
You see, sir'
"And lucidly and cogently and brief
ly, wasting no words, I laid my insur
ance proposition before tbe great finan
cier. "He listened in silence. Those fierce
blue eyes of his bored through me like
lancea. When I stopped at last all he
said waa:
" How did you get In heref
" 'I walked in,' 1 answered.
"'Well,' said he, walk out'" New
York Tribune.
Why Elephants Fear Mloe.
It seems Incredible that ao small and
harmless an animal as a mouse Is able
to frighten an elephant almost out of
Its senses. One little mouse In the
hay on which they are feeding will
stampede an entire herd. In their na
tive land there are little animals,
known as chacanas, which feed on a
small, sour berry of which elephants
are very fond. They Uve In settle
ments, something after tbe manner of
prairie doga, under the berry buahea.
When feeding, .the elephants trample
tbe little towns, and the chacanas. In
their fright run up the tubes of the
elephants' trunks. Their long, sharp
claws catch in the flesh, and they can
not be ejected. The more violently tbe
monster blows through its colled trunk
the more firmly tbe booked clawa of
the little animal become imbedded In
the flesh. Inflammation and death are
tbe result In captivity tbe elephants
think they are In danger of the deadly
chacanas when they see a mouse.
Malaria.
Malaria haa been recognized since
the days of Hippocrates as one of tbe
most formidable and destructive of
maladies, the more formidable because
it waa supposed. In accordance with
the name which Maecullob adapted
Cr'lt from the Italian less than a
century ago, to be caused by a per
vasive venom In tbe air. But alnce
tbe epochal observations of Laveran,
the labors of GoUri and bis colleagues
and tbe experimental and discoveries
of Roes it has loat much of Its mys
terious terror, and tbe sure way to Its
prevention and extirpation baa been
revealed. New York Tribune.
Making a Cholos.
"Don't you love the merry prattle oí
the children V
"Yea," replied Mr, Orowcher. with
some hesitation "that la to say, I'd
rather bear Freddie and WHUe prattle
than learning to play the bugle and the
snare druir." Washington Star.
Comparisons.
"Those old warriors must have look
ed grotesque In their elaborate armor."
"Yes; almost aa grotesque aa a man
In a baseball catcher's outfit or a foot
ball suit" Exchange.
A rol d Sedative Coach Medicines.
If you want to contribute directly
to the occurrence of capillary bronch
itis and pneumonia use cough me
dicines that contain codlne, morphine,
herein and other sedatives when you
have a cough or cold. An expectorant
like Chamberlain's Cough Remedy 1s
what Is needed. That cleans out the
culture beds or breeding places for
the germs of-4tieumonla and other
germ diseases, That is why pneu
monia never results from a cold when
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy Is used.
It has a world wide reputation for its
cures. It contains no morphine or
other sedative. For sale by all deal
era. Adv.
, -The Coe brothers of near Carrlzozo
hope' to' realise 11,000 per acre from
tboly apple crop grown on the Ruidosa.
' Chroale Dyspepsia,
The following unsolicited testimon
ial, should certainly be sufficient to
give, hope and courage to persons af
flicted with chronic dyspepsia: "I
have been a chronic dyspeptic for
years, and of all the medicine I have
taken, Chamberlain's Tablets have
doñeóme more good than anything
else,'? aays W. G. Mattlson, No. 7
Sherman St., Hornellsvllle, N. Y. For
gale by all dealers. Adv.
The lovers of hunting in Quay coun
ty have formed the Quay County Game
Protective Association.
.
A Marvelous Itseape.
"My little boy had a marvelous
escape," writes P. F. Bastlams of
Prince Albert, Cape of Good Hope.
"It occurred in the middle of the
nlgn$. He got a very severe attack
of croup. As luck would have it, I
had a large bottle of Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy In the house. After
folbwlng the directions for an hour
and twenty minutes he was through
all danger." Sold by all dealers Adv.
Twenty-eight cars of apples have
been shipped from Hagerman, and
there are more to follow.
f They Make You Feel Oond
Tha pleasant purgative effect pro
duced, by Chamberlain's Tablets and
the healthy condition of body and
mind which they create make one feel
Joyful, For sale by all dealers. Adv,
' WILY KING EDWARD L
Fooled the Rebellious Welsh With the
Prinoa of Wales.
After a llfeloag struggle with the
Welsh, Edward L of England sought
to ascertain the cause of their constant
rebellion and was Informed that they
would never be content until they had
a prince of their own.
The wily old monarch asked them If
a prince born In Wales who could not
apeak a word of English would be sat
isfactory, and they received the offer
with great enthusiasm, presuming that
the king meant one of their own flesh
and blood.
Hie queen, about to give birth to a
child, was hurried to the famous Caer
narvon castle, where 600 years ago
Edward IL, the first prince of Wales,
waa born. Thereupon King Edward,
carrying the newly born babe on tbe
ramparts of the castle, announced to
tbe multitude: "Here Is your prince,
born In your own conn try, who knows
no word of English and who, I promise
you, shall be reared by a Welsh foster
mother and shall learn your language.
Accept you him as your prince?"
In all the six centuries Intervening
the eldest son of the king of England
has been Invested and known aa tbe
Prince of Wales. In the year 1911 the
present Prince of Wales and the future
king of England was Invested on the
same spot as his predecessor 600 years
ago. T. Owen Charles In National
Magaslne.
HEAT AND THE BODY.
We Aro Able to Drink Liquids That
",. Would 6oald Our Hands.
The human body can stand far
greater heat if it be dry than if It be
wet and, strangely enough, It can
stand far hotter liquids Inside than
out
For example, the average tea drinker
sips tea at a temperature of about
140 degrees BV sometimes as high aa
145 degree. But be cannot bear bla
hands In water at 130 degrees or his
feet in water higher than 112 degrees.
Few people can stand a bath in water
at 106 degrees.
In parta of central 'Anstraila men
live In an average temperature of 110
degrees F. in tbe abade and 140 de
gress In the sun, while 1S1 degrees
has been registered, in tbe Persian
gulf tbe thermometers on ships vary
between 122 degrees and 14a A re
cent explorer in the Himalayas re
ports that be found at 0 a. m. in De
cember and at more than 10,000 feet
altitude a temperature of 181 degrees F.
Dra. Bleyden and Cbantrey, two Eng
lish scientists, desiring; to ascertain
how high a temperature the human
body could stand, shut themselves In
an oven, of which the heat was gradu
ally raiaed and they were able to bear
It until the thermometer registered 212
degrees F., the boiling point of .water.
8t Louis Poat-Düpatch.
JZ We have ust reoel ved a shipment of S
8 916 cans of Guaranteed Inspected g
k Floor, Household
TURPENTINE & OILS.
O Anything from a half pint to 10 Gallon cans. Also see the 18 artlstlo sue- .
gentians on how to paint Your Homo,
TMB
Ronerts & Leahy Mercantile Co.
X ( IHOOBPORATSD ) k?
g LORDSBURO ; : : HEW MEXICO S
JOSHUA 8. RATNOLD8, President.
JAS. OKAHAM MuNAKV, Vice-President,
W. L. TOOLKV. Vico-Presldont.
TI1E
First National Bank
EL PASO, TEXAS
CAPITAL AND 8UUPLl'S 800,000
rK POSITS 4,500.000
TTnlted. States Depository
4 percent, interest paid on Savings Accounts.
Correspondence Is Invited from those who contemplate opening Initial or additional
accounts In Kl Paso.
Assets - - - - $6,000 000
Deposits made by mall are promptly acknowledged.
SB5rl5ra5grl5rl5E5H55aSir!Sa SaSHSESHSSSaSrlS-gSESHSHSrlS n
come to everybody. Life has
while you are making, you ought to be saving
For the Raihy Day.
Where is the money you have been earning all these years?
Some one else has deposited It in the bank.
Why don't you put your own money in the bank? Why let the
other fellow save what you earn?
Start May, Op a Ban Account Witü
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
of X-ords"bxror 2ST-
BTrjSH5a5rl5a5rl5a5a5rl5rl5 gSHSaSeLSrljJSSSiELS rZeSaSBggSgSBSjB
WmM
s
MINE
f
"Vi
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and Carriage Paints, á
BDOAR W. KAYSKK. Cashier.
WALTBIt M. ULTLKH. Asst. Cashier.
O. T, MUOltB, Asst. Cashier
more ups than downs. Right now
GENERAL
MERCHANDISE.
EAGLE DRUG
MERCANTILE CO.
AND RANCH SUPPLIES
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