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Las Vegas optic. (East Las Vegas, N.M.) 1908-1921, May 27, 1909, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 1

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WANT ADS'
PAY WELL
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And .Be Sure.
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Tonight Fair '
and Warmer;
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VOL. XXX, NO. 178
EAST (-AS VEGAS, NEW MEXICO, THURSDAY, MAY 27, 1909
AFTERNOON EDITION
WEATHER
FORECAST
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...
COUNCIL 0
AY
DO SOME
PROBING
ALDERMAN FORSYTHE DEMANDS
A THOROUGH INVESTIGA
: ' T!ON.
4 N E N T , PUBLICATION LAW
SAYS PEOPLE SHOULD KNOW
AUTHOR OF "OUTRAGEOUS"
MEA8URE. ,
ALSO DISPLAYS PATRIOTISM
SUCCEEDS IN HAVING COMMIT
TEE NAMED TO PURCHASE
FLAG FOR CITY HALL
If Councilman B. F. Forsythe has
Jiis way, those men who preside over
the destinies of the city are going
into the investigating business. At
the regular meeting of the board of
aldermen last night, immediately af
ter that body was called to order
for the evening session by Mayor
Goodall, Mr. Forsythe secured recog
nition for the purpose of discussing
a certain Jaw enacted by the recent
territorial legislature providing for
the publication of legal notices, etc..
in newspapers and fixing the
therefor. .
rata
This subject came before the coun
cil when, the minutes of the previous
meeting were read by the clerk, show
ing that a communication' addressed
to congress , tea been passed by the
council, and forwarded to that honor
able body, protesting vigorously '
against this law and urging its re-
peal.' ' . . :
. "I think that this body should take
eteps to find out the author of this
outrageous" measure," said Mr. Fot
sythe, ia the course of hia remarks.
Continuing he said: "It la generally
understood about town that the re
presentative from East Las Vegas
was the father of -this law, and If
.that Is true then the taxpayers and
Citizens generally should be apprised
of this fact." However, no action
was taken Toy the council, last night
which would tend toward ,an investi
gation and it Is not at all likely that
there will be. for Mr. Forsythe Is not
taken seriously by anybody but hlm
self. Forsythe on War Path. .
Councilman Forsythe also raised
another question. He asked the city
clerk when the present contract for
city printing with The Optic expired,
intimating that thereafter bids for
the city printing should be. called
for. and the contract awarded to the
loweBt bidder. The clerk informed
him that the contract expired, June
10th. -But the council (Mowed this
matter to also, lie over until the next
' session.
Under the bubiness . of reports of
standing " committees, the committee
1 on public health reported that there
were no carlet feer cases at pr
ent in East Las Vegas. .
Although It was generally expected
. that the council last night would take
some action on ordinances affecting
the electric light and street railway
companies, Councilraen Forsythe and
Nolan were of the opinion that these
ordinances should be referred to a
special committee to be thoroughly
gone over by this committee and an'
attorney who could give them all the
Information they desired on the sub
jects dealt with. , A motion to this
effect carried and this matter went
over till the next meeting. Counsel
representing the .wporations named
was on hand, expecting action to be
taken on the ordinances, but they left
the city hall when they found there
would be nothing doing at the meet
ing last night -.- ,
Bubbles Over With Patriotism.
It seemed to be Alderman For
eythe's busy night. In a patriotic
speech he made a plea for a flag to
float from the flag pole over the pity j Peace commission, who was in The exercises Of the Literary Bo
hall and expressed great Indignation V.'asMrsrton recently. ' clety , on : Monday night opened the
that. Old Glory in the past was never
seen floating over the city building
on proper occasions. He thought it
a disgrace to East Las Vegat for such
negligence to be tolerated and! made
a motion tJiat steps be taken; by the
council at once to have a flag adorn
the city hall- flag pole hereafter,
particularly on Memorial - day. He
put this suggestion in the form of a
motion for the appointment of a com
mittee with instruction to attend to
the matter and secure a flag for the
purpose mentioned no matter's what
the cost. The myor named a com
mittee of three, of which Mr, For
sythe was - made,, the chairman, and
he promised to have the flag there
by Memorial day at all hazards.
Tax Ordinance Held Up.
The annual . tax levy ordinance
came up on third reading preparatory
to its passage. It had already been
published, but a discussion- arose as
to its provisions and after consider
able talk pro and con, the mayor re
ferred it to a special -committee
which is to meet with a like commit
tee from- the Board of Education, for
a thorough discussion of the ordin
ance. This committee was Instructed
to make, a report at the next meeting.
The council after a prolonged dis
cussion took action on the' applica
tion of Gus Lehmann for a permit
to construct a one-story brick building
with plate glass front on Railroad
avenue, adjoining Bacharach's store.
The application was referred to the
building inspector with instructions
for that official to issue a permit to
Mr. Lehmann for the erection of this
building, the contract for whieh will
be awarded In the next few days.
The plans and specifications comply
with the provisions of the building or
dinance concerning fire proof struct
ures. -
At last night's meeting there were
present Mayor Goodall, President J.
K. Martin and Councilmen Forsythe,
Hubbard, Bacharach, Rogers, He'dg-
cock and City Attorney Ooors,, An
adjournment was taken at 9:3d o'-
clock to meet at the call of the may
or,- which probaby means that the
council ' -will' '. meef " soon to tak' ac
tion on" the electric light company and
translat company franchises and oth
er matters affecting these corpora
tions In, their relations with the city.
EDO TESTIFIES v
; -"OTOALFd'OEO
Kansas City, Mo., May 27. -An un
usual spectacle was presented in the
criminal court here today when James
Sharp, known as "Adam God", and
his wife Melissa Sharp, who went un
der the name of "Eve God," to the
followers of their band of roving re
ligionists, went on the stand at the
trial of Sharp, who is charged with
murder. The woman is yet to be
tried. The testimony of, the couple
proved a weird, pitiful exhibition of
tears, lamentations and wild say
ings. Mrs. Sharp reviewed the his
tory of herself and husband. When
she told if their conversion she wall
ed plteoii8ly and screamed so' loud
she could be heard in the ' ;'street
"Adam God" wept almost constantly
during the half hour he was on the
;Vand. He explained in detail the
beliefs of himself and hand and told
of their dolpgs.
"Brother," said Sharp finally, ad
dressing the trial Judge, and with
tears streaming down his, face,
"it all 1 ' came to me in revela
tion ,.as" I lay
sleep in
my' cell
last 'night. The Lord aid to me,
just like it was in the Bible, that my
enemies ; are my friends-. Now . the
Lord means I must turn that saying
around if I'm to find my friends, I
must go among my enemies. That's
justjthe reason God led me into this
court room."
' Sharp denied he shot Patrolman
Mull an e with whose death he ia
charged.' He declared he fired Into
the air. ' . .
TAFT DRAWS BARREL OF
SAUER KRAUT AT FAIR.
'Sandusky, Ohio, May 27. President
Taft holds the ticket that drew a bar
rel of saaer kraut worth $3 at the
fcJks' fair here last night. It was delivered at the Institution. It was
presented to him by William Homer crammed with thought, expressed In
Relnhart, president of the Perry Vic- forceful language und splendidly de
tory and International Centpnftif.l j livered. ,j -
OCEAN 1.1
NEB
AGROUND
IN FOG
PRINZESS ALICE MEETS WITH
ACCIDENT IN NEW YORK
HARBOR.
PASSENGERS NOT IN DAMB
CAPTAIN CONFIDENT OF GETTING
VESSEL OFF ROCKS WITH
, RISING TIDE.
VEST LITTLE EXCITEMENT
ABSENCE OF ANY CAUSE FOR
ALARM .PREVENTS POSSI- j
BLE PANIC ON BOARD.
New York, May 27. The, North
German Lloyd passenger, steamer
Prinzess Alice ran aground near Fort
Wardswortb, Staten Island, while pag
ing out of this harbor today bound
for Bremen,
to a fog.
The accident was due
; '
Although the Prinzess Alice was
making her way cautiously throughout that other rivers will rise above
the Narrows, the weight of the great .the danger point In - both, states
liner forced her bow high on the
rocks and almost in touch with the
sea wall wihch surrounds Fort Wads -
worth. The vessel's stern, however,
remained afloat and as the tide was
rising when she grounded, the captain ,
Is confident of getting' his vessel,
afloat within a few hours.
The Prinzess Alice carried a large
number of passengers butMhere wafl
little excitement - when the -Accident
occurred, due to the absence of any
Immediate danger! ' '.
, Steamer collide Witn iceberg.
St Johns, N. F., May 27. With her
bow .badly damaged from a collision.
with an Iceberg, the liner Alraeriana etage resulting In practically drown
came Into this port today from Liver- lng an jan(j crops, also many cattle
pool. Sne reported great bergs of
Ice off the coast , The liner hit
an iceberg about midnight on. Tuea-
day. ' The passsengers on the steam-,jmg
er Prospero, which was obliged to put
back into this port today because of i
ice floes, stated they counted over :
one hundred icebergs during a
sail
of forty miles.
SENATE TURNS DOWN
AMENDMENT BY BRISTOW.
Washington, May 27. The senate
today refused by a vote 36 to 47 to
strike the Dutch standard test out of
the sugar schedule of the tariff bill
as proposed by Senator Joseph R.
Bristow of Kansas. " i - ' .
THIRTEEN TREACHEROUS
TURKS SUFFER DEATH,
Constantinople May 27. Thirteen
men were hanged in public at day
break in Constantinople today having
ben found guilty of complicity in the
revolutionary outbreak of April 13.
BR1LUANI COMMENCEMENT
Graduating exercises - -last' night
closed the series of ' brilliant exercis
es which have filled commencement
week at the Normal University. All
the exercises "have "been of a very
high order, in fact there has. been an
air of finish and elegance about them
that -has been a pleasant surprise to
most people. Few have realized dur
ing the yearthat such high class
work was being done In the' univer
sity. -y..., - . .
In the first place the address by
Dr. Gowettflast Sunday was unusual
ly able arid finished, in fact many
I pronoun c it the finest address ever
FLOODS RUIN
SOUTHERN
CROPS
UNPRECEDENTED RAIN AND
WIND STORMS OCCUR IN
.' ' GULF STATES. ,
VAST ASEAS UNDER WATER
MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA AND ARK
- ANSAS AT MERCY OF
ELEMENTS. f
TRAFFIC . IS EEKORAUZED
TRAINS STALLED AND IN MANY
INSTANCES ONLY MEANS OF'
TRANSIT IS BY BOAT.
Memphis, Tenn., May 27. Reports
from -the surrounding country bring
advices of the devastation done by
recent rain and wind storms in the
south. Mississippi and Arknansas
; seem to have suffered the most. The
(Arkansas river is out of its banks
and flood warnings have been sent
crops ere Baid to be destroyed insev-
, era! localities, while many towns are
, under water1 and families have been
i driven to the roofs of their homes
and the only means of transit is by
boat. Great damage has been done
to railroads and several trains are
! stalled, while telephone and telegraph
i wires are down in many localities.
.Yebrday a tornado -paas&ed over
northern Mississippi wrecking .many
houses.
L ' Loss Complete In Alabama.
Mobile, Ala., May 27. Practically
every ana creek -in lower Ala-
bama ani Mississippi Is at the flood
and destroying much lumber. Re
ports from Shubuta, Miss., are that
that town Is virtually an island, be-
cut off from the outside world
except by , telephone anil telegraph.
MOTOR CAR PATHFINDERS
BUCKING THE QUICKSANDS.
Torreon, Mex., May 27. The Den
ver to Mexico pathfinders are here,
having covered 310 miles over good,
bad and indifferent roads without
trouble since leaving Chihuahua Mon
day morning. They were lost ..five
times. The pathfinder was dug from
the quicksand last Friday and the
party traveled all night. The follow
ing night they slept in the mountains,
reaching Chihuahua Sunday pooa. On
their trip territory has been covered
where motor cars never traveled be
fore. Seven hundred miles remain to
the destination, which, they expect to
reach by June 1. Eddie DeCamp, of
the City of Mexico, is on his way to
act as pilot from here.
AT NORMAL UNIVERSITY
eyes of everybody.' No one imagined
that , such work was being done by
the boys and girls, as the entertain
ment showed had been done. The de
bate was especially lively and inter;
e8t'lhg. . , - -
The concert of the Mandolin and
Glee clubs on Tuesday night also at
tracted a good deal of attention, and
reflected no little credit-on Mrs. Gow
en, who trained them. Mrs. Gowen
received her musfcaT education, in the
conservatories' of Cincinnati and Bos
ton. Not only at this concert but the
music at all the exercises during com
mencement week has proved not only
that she If, a trained musician, but
one of taste who possesses great skill
in dealing with young people.
The graduating exercises last night
were up to the standard of the other
entertainments. Those . who received
diplomas were' Misses- Artless Browne,
Beulah Hartman. Geraldine Lange,
Bertha Papen and , Maria Schaefer
and Benjamin ; Armijo. The custom
of wearing caps and gowns has been
revived, and this added to the occa
sion last night Dr. " Gowen, of th
Normal University, made a happy
speech, In introducing Dr. A. E. Win-
ship, who delivered the address to the
graduating class. Dr. Win&hip lived
up to his reputation of being "one of
the most entertaining of speakers In
the country. , He has, a fund of com
mon sense and a concise way of say
ing things. ; ' -V .
At the. request of the pesident of
the Board of Repents, ,,Dr. Gowen
presented the diplomas. ; Before do
ing -so he made a very appropriate
talk to the graduates, urging them
not to consider their" education com
pleted simply because they possessed
a diploma .and Tint to value their di
ploma itself more highly than the
knowledge and training the diploma
Is supposed to stand for. , ;
F." H, Pierce, president of the
board of regents, spoke a few words
highly complimentary to. Dr. Gowen,
as president of tbe Normal University
and referred to him as a man of
splendid executive ability., He dwelt
on the fine college spirit which has
been instilled into the students and
the excellent work .which has been
accomplished, under Dr. Gowen's ad
ministration. He said Las Vegas had
a right to be proud of the Institution
and he believed they, were, for the
auditorium has not been able to hold
the people who had wanted to wit
ness the ' exercises of the closing
week night after night. The Optic
'spoke of Dr. Gowen's educational
equipment when he was made presi
dent. It may be repeated here that
he is a graduate of ,both , Yale , and
Clark universities, holding two de
grees from the former, and one, the
doctor's degree, from the latter. He
was a member of the faculty at Yale
several years. Las Vegas W indeed
fortunate In securing the services of
a man so well equipped and should
follow Mr. ; Pierce's suggestion" to n-
ite in trying to secure a larger annual
appropriation' from the territorial leg
islature eo, that more extensive plans
may be carried out at this .institu
tion In the near future. . ,
FAVORS ktZUZZM
OF. LICUQ.T REVENUES
Denver, May 27. President Taft
Emperor .William and President El
liot of Harvard Universitywere plac
ed on "dry" pedestals today by the
General Assembly - of the Presbyter
rian ! church, when their example of
turning teetotalers after many years
was commended in an 'approval re
port by the temperance committee.
Far reaching reforms -through memo
rials to congress are proposed in the
report, among them the. following:
, That the receipt of revenue of any
form from the liquor traffic be dis
continued: , that the federal govern
ment shall no longer issue liquor tax
receipts in prohibition territory; that
interstate' shipments of liquor shall
be discontinued; that a prohibitory
zone twenty miles in width be estab
lished' around every Indian reserva
tion; that the United. States mails be
closed to the advertising or distribu
tion f liquor. '
Newspapers which carry liquor ad
vertisements fell under the ban of the
assembly,, The report of the temper
ance committee commended one
fraternal order , "heretofore noted
for convivial membership" for its ac
tion in discontinuing the sale of li
quor about Its lodge premises.
SEEKING MONEY FOR
TOURIST HOTEL AT CAPITAL.
Washington, May 27. Dr. John P.
Wagnerr a promoter of Santa Fe,
New Mexico, is in Washington seek
ing capital for the construction of a
modern tourist hotel to cost $150,000
to be-erected at the territorial capi
tal. He is meeting with some en
couragement. ,, .
Harry W. Kelley, prominent busi
ness man of East Las VegaB, Is here
working on the.(wooi schedules In the
tariff bill and is protecting the inter
ests of New ' Mexico sheepmen in
splendid shape. He will leave in a
few days for home, and will be ac
companied by his daughter, who nr.?
been attending a finishing siht t! &(
Mount Vernon. '
C01NGT0R
MURDER
SUSPECT
PUEBLO SHERIFF DU&TO ARRIVE
. IN LAS VEGAS THIS
EVENING.
PRACTICALLY IDENTIFIED
LITTLE DOUBT
THAT MAN IN
COUNTY JAIL
IS "BAY"
. GORDON
RE BAS NOT CONFESSED
RUMOR THAT PRISONER HA8 AD
MITTED HE IS BADLY WANT
ED FUGITIVE IS DENIED.
With the arrival in East Las Vegas
this evening of Sheriff Fields W. Mc
Millan, of Pueblo, Colo., the identi
fication of the man arrested here sev
eral days ago on suspicion of being
"Bay" Gordon, the Oklahoma cowboy
wanted for the brutal murder of
Peter Dieter, a Rye, Colo., ranchman
on November iz last, win ne maae
complete, and incidentally Deputy
Sheriff Enrique Sena, who arrested
the man, will know whether he is to
be made richer by the $500 reward
offered for Gordon's! capture. , '
Last night considerable excite
ment was caused by a Tumor that the
prisoner had made a complete con
fession to Sheriff Romero and Deputy
Sena, admitting that lie was Gordon
audnlso .that he had -killed Dieter,
but Inquiry .nttn( sheriff's office this
morning proved this to ; be untrue," '
Sheriff Romero making a positive de
nal of the rumor of the alleged con
fession."." ' '. ' ' ' "
. Still Denies He Is Gordon. .
The prisoner sticks to the story
that Ma name Is James W. Williams
and that the officers are .mistaken
in taking him for . the alleged slayer
of Dieter. -While he has made sever
al damaging admissions and told con
flicting stories while being "sweat
ed" by the officers, he has not made
confession, although during ' the
past twenty-four hours he has weak
ened under the mental strain and
should Sheriff McMillan upon his ar
rival in the city this evening identi
fy him as Gordon, it Is believed that
he will break down and tell all.
Fits Description Exactly.
After exchanging photographs and
minute descriptions of Gordon, the
Pueblo officers were so certain that
the man under arrest here was the
badly wanted fugitive, that Sheriff
McMillan decided to come to Lfts Ve
gas to get the prisoner. Gordon is
described as being 23 years old, 6
feet tall, weight 150 to 160 pounds,
slender build, eyes blue-gray, hair
brown, and smooth shaven. The sup
posed Gordon in the; county jail tal- '
lies exactly with this description ev
en to the "secret" mark on the fore
head and scar on one of his wrists
and because- of these all doubt as to .
the suspect here not being' Gordon
was eliminated in thd ' minds of the
Pueblo officers. '
. Crime a Most Brutal One.
Gordon's crime is unprecedented In
brutality, j Penniless and destitute
Peter Dieter befriended Gordon when ;
no one else would extend a hand. He
took him to hia ranch at Rye, Colo.,
and shared bis cabin with him. On ;
the night of November 13 last Gordon .
arose and shot Dieter . . dead as he
slept' He then carried . the body to
a neighboring haystack where he bur
led It
Gordon then went to Pueblo and
forged Dieter's name to a check for
$540, and succeeded in drawing out ;
every dollar Dieter had in the: bank. :
Gordon returned to Rye near where
Dieter's ' ranch was and by showing's
a forged power of attorney sold evi jf
erything on the Dieter ranch even to
the very stack of hay under "which
he had buried his friend. '
Gordon tbpn returned ' to Pueblo -
and began a week's caroua! of wine.
(Continued on Page 5)

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