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Las Vegas optic. (East Las Vegas, N.M.) 1908-1921, November 20, 1911, CITY EDITION, Image 1

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LAS VEGAS OPTIC
TEA THEK FOFUCAST
Tonight and Tueadav
IHt DAILY MAXIM
Hggs Are 40 Cents a
Dozen: "Don't
Count, etc.
Fair Ter.'ie'u i
Staitouaiy.
EXCLUSIVE A860CIATED PRESS LEASED WIF?E TELEGRAPH SERVICE
VOL. XXXIII. NO. 14.
LAS VEGAS DAILY OPTIC, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1911.
CITY EDITION
EL PASO THROWN
INTO SUDDEN
FRIGHT
RATTLE OF FIREARMS IN JUA
REZ LEADS TO BELIEF REY
ISTAS ATTACKED CITY
ONLY A BIG CELEBRATION
MEXICANS WERE REJOICING
ANNIVERSARY OF BEGIN
NING OF REVOLT
IN
THE UNITED STATES IS READY
WILL PRESERVE NEUTRALITY
AND PREVENT FILIBUSTER.
ING EXPEDITIONS
El Paso, Nov. 20. This city was
greatly excited early today by sounds
of firing at Juarez, at first supposed
to be an attack by Reyistas on the
federal garrison. It developed, how
ever, that the discharge of firearms
was incidental to a celebration by the
garrison of the anniversary of the
Madero revolution, which ended in
driving Porfirio Diaz from the presi
dency of the Mexican republic.
The firing of the celebrants lasted
an hour or more, the number of shots
fired being estimated at a thousand.
El Pasoans were aroused from their
slumbers and flocked to the bridges
and the river bank to witness. If
possible, what they felt sure was a
battle.
This impression was deepend by
the knowledge that the Juarez garri
son has been on the alert for some
sudden developments in connection
with reports of revolutionary activi
ties in which the name of General
Reyes, now under arrest by the Uni
ted States government, has been par
ticularly connected.
The Mexican officials doubled pre
cautions after the arrest of General
Raves, fearing that any act might
precipitate trouble. The feeling of
anxiety over the situation spread in
a modified degree to those along the
Bide of the Rio Grande. When day
light arrived and it was possible for
reports to cross the river the true
situation was disclosed.
It was learned in addition that one
hundred reinforcements arrived in
Chihuahua in time to participate In
the anniversary celebration. Consid
erable significance is attached by lo
cal observers to the fact that the
government has deemed it wise to
strengthen the force occupying Jua
rez. Order From Stimson
Washington, Nov. 20. Determined
to stamp out filibustering expeditions
against Mexico, Secretary of War
Stimson today authored t'.eneral
Duncan, commanding the Department
of Texas, to enforce the neutrality
laws with vigor and to move the
troops under his command within di
visional limits without waiting orders
from the department.
Secretary Stimson also informed
General Duncan he would not lack
for the cavalry and infantry needed
to prevent the organization of expedi
tions against Mexico. No additional
troops have yet been ordered to Tex
as, however.
General Bernardo Reyes, arrested
in San Antonio Saturday on a charge
of violating the neutrality laws of the
United States, was arraigned today
before United States Commissioner
Edwards on a new warrant, which
also charged that Reyes is a fugitive
from Webb county, in the southern
district of Texas, where Laredo is sit
uated. Reyes gave $10,000 bond.
The war department is moving with
energy in dealing with the Incipient
rebellion being fomented in Texas
against President Madero's govern
ment In Mexico. Secretary Stimson
received a telegram today from Gen
eral Duncan that Major Hagedorn,
commanding a battalion of the Twenty-third
infantry, has captured, at La
redo, Juan Berigo, a captain, and two
privates of a company being organized
there for revoluttonjary service In
Mexico. Major Hagedorn also cap
tured 40 guns, 20,000 rounds of am
munition and 50 dynamite bombs.
There were about 15 supposed revolu
tionists in the house where the cap-
ture was made, but all save the cap
tain and two privates escaped.
Secretary Stlmson is in constant
communication with General Duncan
and has instructed the latter to co
operate with the agents of the depart-
, ment of justice.
All this is beine done, it is said, be
cause President Taft believes the
American peope should give the Mexi
cans a fair chance to test their new
government without interference.
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Chicago, Nov. 20. Extensive dam
age to wheat on the stormswept Ar
gentine pampas gave the price of the
cereal today a sudden upward jerk.
Opening figures here were the same
ah Snturday night to Vfe higher. May
started at M to 101, a gain of
to V, and then jumped to 101.
Corn, apnearfd to be over but ral
':;d OTin to the strength of wheaL
May opened unchanged to a shade
lower at U to 64, touched 64
and recovered to 65.
Oats suffered from lack of demand.
May started at Saturday night's lev
el, 50 cents and eased off to 4950.
Heavy selling on the part of a lead
ing packing concern made provisions
weak. Initial sales showed a drop
of.f. to W cents with May at $16.65
io $16.70 for pork: $9.47 to $9.52
for lard and $8.70 for ribs.
THREE HUNDRED MEN
WILL mm 51RIKE
ROCK ISLAND EMPLOYES AT
TRENTON, MO., SAY THEY
WILL QUIT WORK.
Trenton, Mo.,. Nov. 20. According
to shopmen employed here by the
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific rail
way, they have received orders to
strike tomorrow. About 300 men are
affected. The company, evidently in
expectation of such action, has erect
ed a big board stockade, surmounded
by heavy barbed wire about its plant.
Officials Not Notified.
Chicago, Nov. 20. Officials of the
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific rail
way said they had received n, word
that a strike of the shopmen would
begin in Trenton tomorrow.
"A strike may be called at any
time," it was said in the office of Vies
President Melcher, "but it will be
contrary to all precedent to call a
strike without notifying the officials
of the road. We have received no no
tification yet."
MIKE DONLIN WILL
REJOIN THE GIANTS
WILL HOLD DOWN THE SUN GAR
DEN AND IS EXPECTED TO
MAKE GOOD
New York, Nov. 30 Baseball fans
here today greeted with delight the
announcement, unofficial, but apar
ently authoritative that Mike Don
lin will play right tield for the Giants
next season. It was declared that
negotiations have been practically
concluded with the Boston Nationals
for Mike's, transfer to Manhattan in
exchange for Jack Murray, and $3,000
in cash.
Since the defeat of the Giants in
the world's series, Manager McGraw
has been casting about for a right
fielder to take the place o Murray,
who failed to make even one hit In
the series.
Donlin rejoined the Giants in the
middle of last season, after being out
of the game several years, but was
used by McGraw only as a pinch hit
ter. He seemed to have slowed up
and McGraw decided to let him go
to Boston, where he made good.
ANOTHER AUTO ACCIDENT
Savannah, Ga., Nov. 20. One auto
mobile driver was killed and another
seriously hurt today in a smash up
on the grand prize course nere. Joe
Dawson, the Marmon driver was
hurt and McNay, a Case pilot, was
killed.
BATH TRUST CASES
Detroit, Nov. 20. The govern
ment's criminal case against the
firms and individuals in the Bath Tub
trust will begin in the federal court
here January 30, it was announced
today.
THREE WEEKS OF
HARD WORK
LOST
THIS WILL OCCUR IF THREE
JURORS IN M'NAMARA TRIAL
ARE EXCUSED BY JUDGE
THEY HAVE OFFERED REASONS
THE MEN ARE EITHER ILL OR
HAVE RELATIVES AT POINT
OF DEATH
WOULD LEAVE ONLY TWO
THIS WOULD REQUIRE COURT TO
RETURN PRACTICALLY TO
BEGINNING OF CASE
Ix8 Angeles, Nov. 20. Illness, the
seeming evil genius of the McNamara
trial, dragged another talesman from
the jury box today and threatened to
rake others. William 'Nicholson,
groceryman, asked and obtained an
excuse from jury service because of
the illness of his wif, setting at
naught the hours spent by opposing
counsel to learn if he could fairly and
impartially try James B. McNamara
for the murder of Charles .1. Hagger
ty, a machinist killed in the Los An
gles Times explosion a year ago.
Still in the box are F. D. Green,
whose wife at Pomona Is reported
threatened with nervous prostration
J. B. Sexton, whose brother ts at
the point of death, and Byron Lisk,
Who has asked to be excused be
cause of trouble with his eyes. These
three are sworn jurors and they rep
resent about three weeKs of hard
court work., ,
The list, however, does not end
with them. Seaborn Manning, a
rancher, who coughed at night, was
excused ajL his own request, backed
by a committee of talesmen. Samuel
Mendenhalt, another rancher, precipi
tated one of the dramatic scenes of
Phe trial when, with tears in his eyes,
he refused to take the juror's oath
because his mother was critically ill.
He finally was sworn but was excus
ed. F. W. Clarke, a retired undertaker,
completes the list. He had heart
trouble.
Should Sexton, Green and Lisk be
excused, only two sworn jurors, Rob
ert Bain and William Andre would be
left to show for six weeks of court
sessions.
T. O. Sanderson, a venireman, was
excused later in the day because of
his wife's illness, and ,1. R. Jackson
was excused for the same reason.
Fred De J. Meyer was excused on
account of bias, and P. A. McBurney,
a contractor, was challenged on the
same ground.
The state resisted both challenges.
Each man said he believed McNamara
guilty.
FLOODS CAUSE
WATER FAMINE
SEATTLE IS FLOOD BOUND AND
ALL WESTERN WASHINGTON
IS APPREHENSIVE.
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 20 With Se
attle facing a water famine and many
of the smaller towns west of the Cas
cade mountains under water or cut
off from communication with the out-,
side world by the loss of bridges and
the washing out of roads, the people
of western Washington are anxiously
watching for signs of subsidence of
the flood that has raged for more
than two days. The railroads that
cross the Cascades with their trans
continental lines, are virtually tied
up, the only outlet being over the
coast lines to Portland and then east
along the Columbia river.
TAFT'S COLD BETTER
Washington, Nov. 20. President
Taft's cold was better today. The
president intends to work in his lib
rary on his message to congress and
ether important matters and will re
ceive cabinet officers and other of
ficials there.
PRETTY WOMAN
I
COURT
MRS. GERTRUDE PATTERSON IS
PLACED ON TRIM. FOR MUR
DER OF HER HUSBAND.
STATE TO BE PARTICULAR
WILL ENDEAVOR TO KEEP YOUNG
MEN OFF JURY FEARING
BEAUTY'S INFLUENCE.
A MILLIONAIRE IS INVOLVED
EMIL StJSOUSS OF CHICAGO
SAID TO HAVE BEEN LOVER
OF THE MURDERESS.
IS
Denver, Colo., Nov. 20. Gertrude
Gibson Patterson was put on trial in
the dingy West side court today,
charged with Ae murder, on Septem
ber 25, of her husband, Charles A. Pat
terson. At the time of the alleged
murder, Patterson who came here
from Chicago for his health, had only
a fortnight or so to live.
Few recognized the demure, graceful
figure clad in a blue tailored gown,
and the serene face lighted by large,
dark eyes, as she entered the court
room. Not until she had passed with
in the railing surrounding lawyers and
newspaper men and taken a seat be
hind her attorney, O. N. Hilton, with
ier back squared to the crowd, did
the spectators realize that the prin
cipal figure in a story said to include
a romance with 'a Chicago millionaire,
as well as the dark climax of murder,
was before thera.
Long before 10. o'clock, the hour set
for beginlfing the session, the court
yard was packed with a throng of
persons anxious to catch a glimpse of
the defendant.
The Patterson case will be the first
to be tried under the new jury sys
tem in Colorado, by which the names
of 4,000 taxpayers are kept in a "jury
wheel," from which they are taken
haphazard. In the venire of 60
drawn today, it was noted that a large
number of the men were young. The
state is not particularly desirous of
combating the influence of a beautiful
weman in distress before a jury of
men who may not have reached their
complete sentimental maturity.
The name of Emil Strouss, of Chi
cago, a wealthy clothing manufac
turer, was brought into the case when
Special Prosecutor Benson was ex
amining Venireman Lewis Cohen. He
asked Cohen If he was acquainted
with or had any dealings with the Cht-
cagoan.
TEACHERS RETURN
AND PUPILS MOURN
SCHOOL REOPENED THIS MORN
ING AFTER SHORT VACATION;
PEDAGOGUES PLEASED
After one of the most successful
sessions in the history of the Educa
tional association of New Mexico the
last of the band of pedagogues from
the Meadow City returned from San
ta Fe yesterday afternoon. The
teachers left for the Ancient City
Wednesday afternoon and from the
time of their arrival in Santa Fe to
the time of their departure for home
the convention was one rouna or
proiftaible business meetings or en
joyable entertainment. The teachers
of Las Vegas are exceedingly grate
ful for the hospitality extended them
by their fellow teachers in the Capi
tal City.
School opened again this morning
after the little vacation with the
students none the worse for their
holiday, but at the same time as sor-
rv on acount of the opening of
school as they were glad for its short
closing. The holiday for Thanksgiv
tag la but a short time off, however,
and will give the children something
to think, about, besides their studies,
and the intervening days will whirl
past la short order. After that it
will take good hard work on the part
of the pupils to make up for the loss
of over a week in tb first half of the
school year.
BROUGHT
NTO
DETAILS OF "TAR
PARTY" MADE
DISTRICT ATTORNEY M'CANLESS
TELLS COURT OF HATCH
ING OF PLOT
HIREG A BARBER TO AID
THE RAZOR WIELDER TOOK MISS
CHAMBERLAIN OUT RIDING;
THEY DID THE REST
TORE CLOTHES OFF THE GIRL
WHILE ONE 'POURED ANOTHER
RUBBED TAR UPON HER
NAKED BODY
Lincoln Center, Kan., Nov. 20.
How the Shady Bend "tar party" met
at the mill of E. G. Clark, one of the
wealthiest citizens of the community,
and arranged the details of the plot to
tar Misa Mary Chamberlain, the
school teacher whose frightful exper
fence at the hands of a band of men
and boys last August convulsed all
Kansas, was told on the witness stand
by Chester Anderson, one of the
"party" at the beginning of the trial
today.
The three men on trial today were
Sherill Clark, brother of E. G. Clark,
the miller who pleaded guilty, and
John Schmldtt and A. N. Simms, far
mers. Anderson testified that they
were not members of the band who
actually "spread the tar" as they
came to the rendezvous on foot and
were unable to keep up with the oth
ers, who rode motorcycles.
County Attorney McCanless made
the opening statement for the prose
cution. Narrating the entire history
of the case, he told how tf plot was
laid1 in Shady Bend August 7; how
Edward Ricord, the Beverly barber,
was hired to take Miss Chamberlain
out in a buggy on the pretense of es
corting her to a country dance and
then to deliver her over to the men
with the tar, hiding behind the fence.
He told how Chester Anderson and
Delbert. Kindelsparger had played the
highwaymen on the barber and the
girl.
"They held up their buggy at the
point of pistols," McCanless declared.
"They took the young woman from
the buggy and threw her on the
ground. They tore off her clothes,
and while one poured another rubbed
the tar upon her naked body. All of
the men wore masks."
While the three defendants had not
been at the actual "tarring" McCan
less said, by their own boast, the
reason they were absent was because
they were unable to keep pace with
the motorcycles. They were equally
to blame with the others, he said.
GOVERNOR JOHNSON
FOR LA FOLLETTE
CALIFORNIA EXECUTIVE IS ALSO
IN FAVOR OF A PRESIDEN
TIAL PRIMARY ELECTION
Sacramento, Calif., Nov. 20. Gov
ernor Johnson came out squarely for
La Follette for president and a di
rect presidential primary, in a forma)
statement issued today. Declaring
that while a joker In the primary law
of 1909 gave the party in power full
right to send a solid delegation for
La Follette, tie governor indicated
that he was sacrificing politics to
principle and would insist that the
people be given the right to name
first hand their choice, for president.
He pointed out that President Tait
had favored San Francisco in its fight
for the exposition which might swing
the voters of that city In the presi
dential favor. But even in the face
of this possibility and with the joker
in the law designed to perpetuate the
power of the old Southern Pacific
machine, the progressives would still
insist on a direct presidential prefer
ence primary, he said.
SUGAR STILL FALLING
New York, Nov. 20. All grades
of refined sugar were reduced ten
cents a hundred pounds today.
PUBLIC
OBJECTS TO INVESTIGATION
Washington, Nov. 20. Richard V.
Landabury, counsel for the United
States Steel corporation made objec
before the Stanley Steel trust inves
tigating committee today to a con
tinuance of hearing, In view of the
government's suit against the Steel
corporation.
He argued that to continue the
hearing would be against the provi
sions of the resolution of congress
authorizing inquiry into acts not un
der investigation by the government.
The committee at once went, into exe
cutive session. After lengthy delib
eration it was decided to postpone
further consideration of the objec
tion until the assembling of the full
committee.
DISTRICT COURT OPENS
UNUSUALLY SHORT TERM
WILL TRY TO FINISH WORK IN A
WEEK BY HEADING ONLY
CRIMINAL CASES.
Confinding itself strictly to criminal
business, the isovember term of the
district court for San Miguel county,
which was convened, this morning by
Judge Clarence J. Roberts, will make
an effort to complete its activities be
fore Saturday evening, when it is
hoped that adjournment may be
taken. The veniremen for both the
grand and petit juries were present in
court this morning and the work of
empaneling those bodies was begun
at once. Shortly before noon the ve
nires had been exhausted. The pan
els remained Incomplete and Judge
Roberts ordered special venires
drawn. These were placed In the
hands of Sheriff Secundino Romero
and were made returnabe at 2:30
o'clock this afternoon. But one
talesman was needed for the petit
jury and it was expected thai, body
would be empapeled in a short time
while it was hoped also that the
grand jury might be instructed and
started upon its work before this
evening.
The names of the men upon the
panel of the petit jury were as follows
when the noon recess was taken:
Nicasio C. de Baca, Benigno Romero,
Modesto Solano, Marin Gallegos, Fran
cisco Aragon, Gus Lehman, SUverlo
Mares, Charles Trumbull, Fermln Ro
remo, Sebastian Ortega, Marcelino
Dominguez, Amos Clyne, Juan B.
Chaves, Serapio Baros, Miguel Gar
cia, Facunda Montano, Anselmo Gon
zales, Alberto Serrano, Francisco Ange,
Jesus Lucero, Luis Sedlllo, Estanis
lado Saiz, Victor Lucero. Cases set
for trial this afternoon and tomorrow
morning are as follows. Juan B. Gon
zales, abandoning wife; Crescendo
Urloste, discharging a gun within a
settlement; Arturo Ricardo, peddling
without a license; Luz Mondragon,
prostitution; landate Quintana, lar
ceny of cattle; Roman de Herrera,
larceny of cattle.
The following officers were appoint
ed by the court: Felix Garcia, bailiff
to grand jury; Hipolito Baca, court
bailiff; Vicente Vilanueva, court bail
iff; Nepomucena Segura, grand jury
interpreter; Luis E. Armijo, court in
terpreter. All of the cases that will be tried
this term are of persons under indict
ment or bail on those in the county
jail, who have been indicted by re
cent grand juries.
VETERAN EDITOR
DIES SUDDENLY
Dr
G. T. GOULD, FORMERLY OF
THE OPTIC, FALLS DEAD IN
ALBUQUERQUE
Albuquerque, N. M., Nov. 20. Dr.
G. T. Gould, 65 years old, one of the
most widely known newspaper men
in New Mexico until a few years
ago, dropped dead shortly after noon
today. He was seen to stagger and
fall and was carried into a nearby
store where he died a few minutes
later. Heart failure was he prob
able cause of death.
Dr. Gould many years ago was
head of a Baptist college in Ken
tucky. He was editorial writer on
the Albuquerque Citizen, Albuquerque
Journal-Democrat, Las Vegas Optic
and several lesser New Mexico pa
pers. He has a son on the El Paso
Herald.
COLMOR CUT-OFF
II
ROAD
SANTA FE'S NEW IMPROVEMENT
IS CHARTERED IN KANSAS AS
INDEPENDENT COMPANY
CONSTRUCTION HAS BEGUN
LINE WILL ELIMINATE HEAVY
GRADES AND CUT OFF MANY
MILES OF TRACK
MEANS MUCH TO LAS VEGAS
BUILDING OF NEW LINE MEANS
ERECTION OF NEW ROUND
HOUSE AND SHOPS
To the Dodge City and Cimarron
Valley railroad, which Is, in reality,
the Santa Fe'e new Colmor "cut-off,
was issued a. charter Saturday in To-
peka, Kan.
The new line will have nearly 200
miles in Kansas. It is purely an At
chison, Topeka and Santa Pe com
pany, the officers of the Santa Fe
owning all the stock. The capital is
$3,600,000, and E. P. Ripley, president
of the Santa Fe, owns 39,934 shares;
0. W. Kouns, F. C. Fox, W. R. Smith,
E. L. Copeland, A. O. Wellman and
J F. Scott, all general officers of the
Saata Fe, own one share each.
The company will build the line
from Dodge City, southwest to Col
mor and a branch line northwest
from Haskell county to the west line
of the state. The main line is 120
miles long and will run through Ford,
Gray, -Haskell, Grant, Stevens and
Morton counties. The branch, starts
near the southeast corner of Haskell
county and runs northwest through
Haskell, Grant and Stevens . counties.
This line will traverse the five
counties in Southwest Kansas now
without a railroad. They are Grant,
Stanton, Stevens, Morton and Has
kell counties. The surveyors are now
running the line for the new railroad
and actual construction work will be
gin In the spring. The Santa Fe will
not ask for any bonds from the town
ships or counties. It will pay all the
construction expenses and the farm
ers are to give the right of way. The
Santa Fe Development company.
owned by the Santa Fe, has recent!,"
purcased 255,000 acres of land in the
five railrondless counties.
The building of the Colmor cut-off
is one of the improvements that Las
Vegas has been anticipating with In
terest since the first announcement
that surveys for the line were being
made, which appeared exclusively in
The Optic over a year ago. The line
will give the Santa Fe a much more
direct line to the coast and will cut
out many miles of track as well as
heavy grades, which are the source
of much expense to the road.
Eventually the Santa Fe will build
the proposed line from Sulzbacher to
Fort Sumner, surveys for which were
made last winter. This will also cut
off heavy grades and shorten the
iroute. Tlhe construction of these
two lines means that Las Vegas is to
become the greatest railroad center
in New Mexico. This city, practical
ly of necessity, will be the headquar
ters for the men and engines run
ning on the two cut-offs. The road
has already caused plans to be drawn
for an immense roundhouse to be lo
cated in Las Vegas. It is said that
construction work upon this structure
will be begun early next year. Ma
chinists also will be located here In
large numbers and the shop facilities
undoubtedly will be greatly Increas
ed. The building of the Colmor and
Fort Sumner cut-offs and the erec
tion of the roundhouse and shops
here will brine to Las Vegas at least
2,000 new residents. The Camfieid
irrigation project will bring probably
twice that many inhabitants to the
country in the immediate vicinity of
this city. Las Vesss should do ev
erything in its power to encourage
the Santa Fe and tlie Camfieid pro
ject as they are both in a position to
return many fold, in Increased pros
perity, any assistance that Is given
them.
uORPORATED

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