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The daily state chronicle. [volume] (Raleigh, N.C.) 188?-1891, September 09, 1890, Image 2

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STATE CHEONIOlJ, TTTESDAlf, SEPTEMBEK 9;
P tahttiwuclc
BY CHRONICLE PUBLISHING CO.
Every Morning Except Monday.
THE CASH PitiCE OF CHRONICLE
X la $0.00 per year; $3.00 for 6 months;
11.50 for 3 months.
THE BUSINESS OFFICE and Editorial
Rooms of the Ciikonicle are on the
second lloor of No. 216, Fayetteville St.
COMMUNICATIONS RELATIVE TO
the Business Department of this paper
Bhould be addressed The Static Chroni
cle, Raleigh, N. C, and all Drafts, Checks
and Postal Money Orders should be made
payable to "The Chronicle Pud. Co."
JOSEPH US DANIELS, - - Editor.
Bus. Manager.
Asso. Editor.
D. II. UltOWDER,
HAL. W. AYEIt -
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1890,
DEMOCRATjCJOMINEES,
For Chief Justice of the Supreme Court :
HON. A. S. MEKRIMON.
For Asso. Jus. of the Supreme Court
HON. WALTER CLARK.
WHY AGRICULTURE HAS
HELD ITS OWN.
NOT
FOR SUPERIOR COURT JUDGE.
1st District Geo. H. Brown, Ji;.,of Beau
fort.
2nd District Henry R.BnYAN,of Craven.
4th District Spier Whitaker. of Wake.
5th District R W. Winston,of Granville.
6th District E. T. Boykin, of Sampson.
7th District James D. McIver, of Moore.
8th District it. F. Arm field, of Iredell.
JOth District Jno. Gray Bynum,o Burke
11th District W. A. Hoke, of Lincoln.
FOR SOLICITOR.
1st District J. II. BLOUNT.of Perquimans
2nd District J. M. Grizzard, of Halifax.
3rd Disirict Jno. E. Woodard,o Wilson.
4th Distrlct-E. W. Pou, Jr., of Johnston.
5th District E. S. Parker, of Alamance,
tith District O. H. Allkn, of Lenoir.
Vth District Frank McNeill, of Rich
mond. 8th District-B. F. Long, of Iredell.
9th DIstrict-W. W. Barber, of Wilkes.
10th District W.C.NEWLAND.of Caldwell
11th District F. I. Osborne, of Mecklen
burg. 12th District Geo. A. Jones, of Macon.
FOR CONGRESS.
1st. DlafHrf W A Tl TJr xt z.tr -
3rd District R. " 0
4th Dist'ii gentleman yesterday to1.
Chronicle not to let Rj Beaufort.
, she woul.vSit'Airi','of' Duplin.
1 SRA-li. H. Bunn, of Nash,
oth District-A. II. A. Williams, of Gran
ville. . .
Cth District-S. B. Alexander, of Meck
lenburg. a
7th District-J. S Hendkrson, of Rowan.
Some days ago the Chronicle printed
the amendment offered in the Senate by
Senator Vance which provided for a
rebate on foreign goods when bought
abroad with the proceeds of the farm.
At that time we called attention to the
fact that the resolution showed how the
farmer was taxed by the tariff more
clearly than any statement we have ever
seen. We also predicted that the amend
ment would be defeated by the Republi
cans. Our prediction has been verified,
as the bill was defeated by a strict party
vote.
We do not hesitate to give it as our de
liberate opinion that this plan advanced
and advocated by Senator Vance will
bring more relief to the people thanany
plan proposed. It would gave every
farmer many dollars every year, and it
would be a direct saving. Other
measures might help, but if the farmer
coald swap his cotton &c. for clothes
and agricultural imploTients free from
the tariff tax, ho would have a clear
saving of an average of 47 per cent,
upon all his purchases. Talk about all
other reliefs proposed, they are small as
compared with this direct reliei5 from
taxation. Suppose the farmers of North
Carolina could make this saving every
year upon all that they buy, how long
would they feel the burdens that now
rest upon them? Relief positive and
apparent relief is offered by Senator
Vance, and every Democrat in the
Senate voted for it, and every Repub
lican voted against it. Again was the
issue drawn and the Republicans seen
opposing every measure that would
bring relief to the farmers. For twenty-five
years Senator Vance has been
the ablest and truest champion of their
iuterests, and ho has left no stone un
turned to secure their relief from taxa
tion. He now proposes to give, the"
direct and speedy relief
them independent
of Mount D
more, where she ? '&nd to make
the nextjj of the burdens of the
tariff. Every Alliance in America ougnt
to officially tbanfc senator vamje
for the introduction of this measure and
for his able speech showing why the
farmers are behind. No living man
has devoted his abilities so exclusively
he imports nothing for the purpose of
re-exporting it, and therefore he can
come in for none Jof these benefits. He
gets no free raw material in his business.
On the contrary, every tool that he uses
is taxed, every chain and piece of har
ness, every pound of iron used in every
one of his wagons, carts or barrows,
every horseshoe and every nail that
holds the shoe on the foot, every pound
of salt with which ho keeps his cattle
alive, every pound of wire with which
he makes his fence; even his garden
seeds and his fruits, plants and vines are
all heavily taxed, to say nothing of his
household supplies, which are taxed in
common with others.
The consequence of this has been nat
urally that the farmer has fallen behind.
It does not matter what a Senator says
here and there about the prosperity of
the farmers of their States. There can
be no doubt, and we know there is no
doubt, but what the prosperity of the
farmer, be it ever so much or ever so lit
tle, is far behind his share of the gen
eral prosperity in comparison with the
other industries of the country.
Now, it devolves upon you Senators
who are the authors of this legislation
either to repair the injury done the
farmer by this policy which has been
pursued for twenty five years, or to jus
tify it by showing that there has been
no wrong, no inequality, no preference
given by law to one class over and at
the expense of the other. I say there
has been a wrong, a great wrong, a
shameful wrong done to the agricultu
ral classes by this legislation.
Mr. President, we are all familiar with
the argument used in support of protec
tion, because we hear it every day, even
by Senators who are somewhat ashamed
to assert it openly and stand upon it
openly, yet bring it in by a kind of a
side-wind, that we have had a protective
tariff for, lo, these many years, and we
have flourished, ergo we have flourished
because of the protective tariff ! It is
called the post hoc, ergo propter hoc
argument. I want to read what the
great English divine, wit, and philoso
pher, Sydney Smith, said upon that sub
ject in his address to the electors of
Taunton, in speaking of certain abuses
in the old borough system, which were
justified precisely as the tarriff is here
justified iv-tyi'd that F.nciind-iv
Rev. J. W. Carter, D. D., Pastor
DR. YORK AG AIN.
jggs icit yesieruav ua nnA hrl this avatpm a
. . I I IM nil. tli L IV A llCtLi LiliVA vu. w
TIIE DEMOCRATIC PARTY AND
SENATOR VANCE ON NA
TIONAL RANKS.
the time, therefore she had uoarisnea
because of that system. Here is the
reply that that great Euglishman made
to it :
"There happens, gentlemen, to live
i i : P
near my parsonagea laooriug man, ui
very superior character and understand
ing to his fellow laborers; and who has
made such good use or tnat superiority
that, ho has saved what is (tor nis sia-
to a consideration of public question, JeZSlS
wim wcoixw w - tQ the common period ne win uio ncu.
equal justice and a fair chance as Sena- jt happens, however, that he is andlpng
tor Vance, and no man is so deserving has been) troubled with stomacn pains,
There is no reason why anyone should
fail to understand the position of Sena
tor Vance upon the question of Na
tional Banks. Ho stands with the Dem
ocratic party, and the Democratic party
in North Carolina is in favor of legisla
tion that will, first, take from them their
monopoly of the currency, and after
wards substitute a better system. In
the declaration of the Farmers' Alli
ance) and of the Democratic platform
nnhodv understands either to favor the
immediate and unconditional wiping out
of the National Banks. That would bo
confusion unspeakable, and the ruin of
many, many debtors. It would be a
blow to business such as we have not felt
in fifty years. There are no institu
tions provided to take their pluce,
and a countrv without tnnka would
be an anomaly in civilization. The
Democratic Convention in its resolution
did not intend any such thing as that,
but that the banking system now exist,
ing should be changed in a proper and
re:iBonable way and a shock to the coun
try avoided. Tho Chronicle ha3 au
thority for saying that to this Senator
Vance heartily agrees. Ho has a bill
pending as tho first step in the process,
to repeal the tax on State Banks. It is
impossible to abolish National Banks
now, oveu if a majority Of the members
of Congress favored it. On the 12th of
July, 1882, a Kupublican Congress,
against the remonstrances of tue
Democratic tarty, extended the char
ters of tho National Banks for a
period of twenty years. Of
course there ean be no abso
lute abolition of the National Banks
until tho charters expire which will be
in 1902. This relief, therefore, cannot be
obtainod for eleven years. But there is
no need of waiting until then for an in
crease of currency. A repeal of the ten
per cent tax on tho circulation of State
of their gratituto and affection.
Senator Vance made a particu
larly strong speech in advocacy of the
amendment from which we make the
following extracts to-day:
Mr. President, there is a very earnest
inquiry abroad in tho country as to the
reasons whv agriculture has not held its
own in tho general advancement and
prosperity of our country. The object
of this amendment which I have offered
is in answer to that inquiry.
It is known, sir, that all of the efforts
which have been made to compensate
farmers for the increased prices which
they have been compelled to pay for the
protection and benefit of manufacturers
have, in a great measure, proved a fail
ure, and there is no pretense that the
inequality in the wages which they are
compelled to pay over that which is paid
by their rivals in production has been
equalized, nor in any way has the attempt
been made to equalizo it. This amend
ment is an attempt to remedy that evil
It may properly be called an import re
bate.
It is necessary, m order to compre
hend the meaning of my amondment, to
look for a moment at what we do and
have done for years and years for the
manufacturing interests and for the
other great industrial interests of tho
country.
In the first place, we give to the man
ufacturers what is called a home market,
almost tho exclusive use of the home
for which ho has hitherto obtained no
relief, and which really are the bane
md torment of his life. Now, it my ex
cellent laborer were to send lor a phys
ician and to consult him respecting this
malady, would it not be very singular
lauguage if our doctor were to
say to him, "My good friend,
you surely will not b3 so rasn as to
attempt to get rid of these pains
in your stomach. Have you not grown
rich with these pains in your stomach ?
Have you not risen under them from
poverty to prosperity ? Has not your
situation, since you were first attacked,
been improving every year ? You surely
will not be so foolish and so indiscreet
as to part with tho pains in your stom
ach." Why, what would be the answer
of the rustic to this nonsensical admoni
tion ! "Mousier of rhubarb !" he would
We see it stated in the papers that Dr.
Tyre York ba again entered the field
as a candidate, and that he wiii be the
opponent of Col. W. H. H. Cowles for
Congress in tho Eighth district. Tcere
is nothing strange about that. The doc
tor is always a candidate when he
thinks that there is any chance for him
to deceive the people. The new thing
about his candidacy this year is that he
announces himself as "the Alliance can
didate." When be ran for Congress be
fore it was just after the Prohibition
campaign and he ran as tho Anti-Prohibition
candidate and appealed to the dis
satisfaction of the people, and tried to es
trange them permanently from the Demo
cratic party. The campaign was short,
Dr. York's deception comparatively
unknown and he succeeded in getting
enough votes to be elected. But the
people returned to their good judgment
before two years expired, and when he
asked them to elect him Governor they
repudiated him by giving very large
majority against him. Since that time
he has represented his county in the
Legislature where his most conspicuous
work was seen in working against the
Railroad Commission. York in the
Eighth, and Thomas in the Seventh seek
ing to run as Alliance candidates are
enough to disgust Alliancemen with
such wolves in sheep's clothing. If
there are any two men in the State who
have outraged consistency and proven
recreant to their duty as representatives
more conspicuously than any other two
who are now asking the suffrages of the
people, they are York and Thomas.
Months ago tho Chronicle warned
the Alliance against the demagogues who
were joining the Alliance in full force
seeking to despoil its members, disrupt
the Democratic party, and securo for
4i. . bouthern scarce aed iiwimun,-
inemseives office. We warned them that
if men who were constitutional office-
seekers and men who had always been
opposed to the Democratic party receiv
ed their endorsement, power and
strength and virtue would have gone out
of the order. Men who seek to use it as
an engine for their selfish purposes are
unworthy of membership, and the sooner
they are excluded the better for tho Al
liance. We do not insult the intelligence of the
Alliance by believing for a moment that
-- v , .1 .1 !11 I
any Democrat in tne oruer win counte
nance the .candidacy of either of these
radical demagogues, much less give
them their support. But the fact that
these men announce thomselves as Alli
ance candidates shows that too much
caution cannot be exercised in admitting
members into, the order, and that dema
gogues beiieve that the people are very
easily deceived. Of course these "Alli
ance" candidates will advocate every
Alliance measure proposed, and they
would advocate a thousand more if they
were asked to do so. The motto of such
demagogues is:
It's not by principles nor men,
My onward course is steadied;
I scents what pays the best
And goes for it bald-headed."
IKE SECOND GREAT SALE
OF1
BUILDING LOTS
THE
OF-
SALEM, VIRGINIA.
-WILL BE HELD ON THE COMPANY'S GROUNDS ON-
FRIDAY, SEPTE
a
I 890
4
MS
At 1 O'clock P. 31., When
Mjpjorjf
Comprising the very cream of tha Company's property will be offered tv,
property of THE SALEM DEVELOPMENT COMPANY is genially admitte-1 to
be the finest property in Salem. Salem is located upon the main line of the Nr
folk & Western Railway, fcix miles west of the City of Roanoke and is the cHr
tered terminus of the Valley Branch of the Baltimore & Ohi
bfi llistlv Stvlp.rl thn rrofoTiraxr tn tho nroat minai.nl o,-..1 V J
- o J J u ji.i'vni.j gikav uiiubiai auu U'Jn.1
region known
"Southwest Virginia." Tt. is tha rinint. wh at a fhrt rnWlnnta nf fh;, t
will first find competition on their way to the Northern and E tstern markets Tim
Roanoke & Southern Railroad will enter Salem through this Company's land'.
No town in the South has kept so steadily advancing
during: the summer months as Salem. The number"
ot buildings erected during the summer has been
asto&uThe population of Salem has "
Ti
doubleu
yithin the last
1,
ten months.
THE DUMMY RAILWAY FROM ROANOKE IS COMPLETED TO WITHIN
ONE MILE OF SALEM,
The Postal and Telegraph Business has increased 350 per cent, in the past ten
months, and money invested in Lots has made from 400 to 800 per cent, in less
than eight months. The first sale made by this Company was made m the 13th
of August, and OVER $230,000 OF LOTS HAVE BEEN SOLD AT AN AVER
AGE OF $G12 PER LOT. The lots to be offered are located in thecaut.-c of the
Company's property and very near the new passenger station of the Norfolk A:
Western Railway. Three passenger trains each day, daily. TERMS OF ALE :
One-third cash, balance in one and two years with interest. Fur maps, etc., address
.A.. Mi. BOW3VA3ST, IPres't,
SALEM, VA.
sept7-Snn &Tu ;
:o:
TH
THE GRANDEST ENTEltmiSE OF
E NEW SOUTH.
-:o:
SEVERAL NEW AND LARGE INDUSTRIES JUST SECURED.
:o.
OVER ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY HOUSES TO BE BUILT AT ONCE:
() ;
NOW 18 THE TIME FOR SAFE INVESTMENT, AND QUICK AND LA KG A.
market, a market composed of G4,000,
000 of the richest people in this world,
and we protect the manufacturers in
that market by high duties, and even by
prohibitory duties. We give the manu
facturers free raw material; or, where
we do not do so directly, we give them
compensatory duties, which are equiva
lent to tree raw material. From time
to time we increase these duties which
have been imposed for their protection
Whenever they demand it, we obedi
ently and obsequiously give them their
demand, and in the very language which
they suggest.
Whenever they produce a surplus
which more than supplies the home
market we give them, for the purpose
of aiding them to obtain a footing in the
markets of the world, a rebate of the
duties on all the imported materials
say, "I am not rich iu coi:Sfquence of
th i pains in vay stomach, but m spue o
the nairs in mv stomacb ; and I should
have bseu ten times richer and iifty
t'.mes happier it i naa never had any
pains in my stomach at all."
(Laughter.)
That is the ro.ST hoc, ergo ruorYEEi
hoc argument. Wo have had a protec
tive taritf here for many years, growing
higher like this man's paiu, and if be
cause by tne gemus and industry of our
people and the fertility cf our soil and
the beneficence of our climate and the
goodness of God we have got along, it
is all because we have taxed ourseiws,
from a slate pencil and a tin cup to a
$100 suit of clothes.
Mr. President, it the tost uoc, eugo
PiiOPTfiii not; argument is good to prove
the emcucy of protection, if it suffices to
account for thy groat prosperity of the
manufacturing classes and a portion of
our people, is it not equally good to ac
count for the calamities that have over
taken the farmer? If you can say that
under the one manufactures have, flour
ished, then are we not entitled to say
that under protection agriculture has de
clined? The manufacturer builds man
sions and ornaments them with a great
deal of free art, and counts his dividends
which are piling up in the bank; the
farmer patches the root of his old house
with taxed shines and taxed nails, and
scrape.- the earth and skimps hi3 family
to raise the money to pay the interest on
RETURNS.
DAVID FUNSTEN & CO.,
Heal Estate and Stock Buokeus
ESfli notified iu advance, we will meet parties at auy train.
. . . . Glasow, Va.
iaug:.i-.ii
A Drive in Cigars.
1 vu
Five thousand R. C. Brown (Stra
and Storm) all Havana Cig-irs. Boxes
of fifty one dollar and seventy five
cents per box. An elegant smoke, and
muoh below the value of the goods.
Eberhaedt & Pescuo.
Stock's Queen,
.Absolutely Pure.
A cream of tartar baking powder. High
est of all in leavening strength. U. S.
Government Report, Aug. 17, 1SS9.
Having secured the control of this fine
brand of Michigan Flour, we will receive
tho first lot in a few days. To those
who have used it, it needs no recommen
dation.
Eberhardt & Pescud.
GOODS,
Banks would be exactly what the agri- which they use in articles which are in
cultaral sections mostly need in the way tended for export. Not only do we do
of financial legislation. If the Farmer's l.nat' but we give them a rebate 011 aQy
Alliance would join Senator Vante and r-f, w.bu13 use? x?
his mortgage. Tnat is tho difference be
tween the two.
The "Boss."
O. D. Boss & Son's Lunch Milk Bis
cuit, the best of all plain crackers. lie-
tail fifteen cents. Close ngure3 to the
trade.
Eberhardt & Pescud.
NORTH CAROLINA
WAGONS.
oxjrt ijnvis op
NECKWEAR
Ie not hero yot, but wo cxr.oet it in j t. u-
daj-s, acd, in the meanwhile, we will !)'- -a
few bargains that will surprise yuu.
BOYS' SHIRT WAISTS (new lot.,
At 25 and 40 cts.
GENTS' NIGHT SHIRTS,
At 70 and SO cts.
GENTS' UNLAUNDRIED SHIRTS,
At 50 cts.
This last lot of fhirta that
beet that we have ever had: amlil' (
buy One, yon will lay in your biinplyol thnj,
Tills w e e k li ii a s us
abundantly prepared t o
The campaign is on. It will be a hotly meet tlie wants of those
contested fight one that will be closer who desire to purchase The Enu.il of Anv Make in
de:
B
Nor
and
bot!
fav
inc:
oft
we
unj
and
&nd
the
nou
son
larj
pec
Lo
tal
in
lib
ra
tic
ac
w
in
fe
... H
3'
a
the Democratic party in an earnest effort they export. If they buy a bottle from
ping and enveloping the product which and hotter than is generally imagined. Dress Goods early.
to fecuro the repeal of that tax. and
together they could secure it, we would
not be troubled about financial questions
in North Carolina or any other State of
the Union. We would have the remedv
abroad which is empty and fill it with
any kind of concoction or decoction and
ship it abroad, we give them a rebate of
the duty upon the bottle. If they buy
a tin can and fill it with any kind of
manufactured or prepared article and
in our own hands, and could qodIv it sbiP ifc abroad we give them a rebate of
easily and without friction. J.f lJj uPon. th can- Atfth? 8amef
Al , . , . time, if they use in the manufacture of
Let there be no misunderstanding of an article intended for export any do
Senator Vance's position. The monop- mestic article upon which an internal
olists and contractionists have iu him a tax nas been imposed, we refund the in
WtfAr fnn u io ni.?n- fr. uaof ternal tax to them. Having done all
r. 6 r that, and enabled them to hold the
imereMs oi mo people, especially tne market by prohibitory duties, when they
farmers who constitute tho largest part undertake to ship any of their surplus
of our4population,and it would begriev- products abroad we subsidize ships to
ously wrong if those for whom he is toil- ca" leir articlea to a forei? mf Ayt.
. . .I , . , For the encouragement of the build-
ing,and earnestly seeking to serve.should ing of 8hip on the other hand, we give
fail to hold up his hands because there free raw material, both for buildinor and
iho auty ot every uemocra. is to ngnt Our unprecedented show
the enemy. There may be troubles in . . , .
the camn. but thev will adiust themselves ms: for this early ill Sep-
if all true Democrats will fight the Repub- tember is the result of the
licans earnestly, vigorously and zeal- most carelul urenaratioil.
the United States !
ously.
HOMESPUN YARNS.
(Asheville Citizen.)
The Citizen noticed a young man at
the banquet last night who was appar- selected with the ffrcatest
Upon our counters may
now be seen some of the
loveliest productions of the
foreiarn makers.
Our Dress stulfs have been
MANUFACTURED BY THE
North Carolina Wagon Co,
RALEIGH, N. C.
Goat Sulkies for the Boys
YVe also have the best line oi
Crockery,
Glass and
Tinware
In tho city and tho priced are tho lowc.-t.
WHITE CEDAR BUCKETS,
22 and 25 cts. each.
WELL BUCKETS AT 35 CTS,
And we have the beat
25CT : CORSET
IN TOWN.
Ask for tho Jcaxita. if von want tw. i,.r
All the30 at
Woolcott& Son,
14 E. MARTIN STREET.
a
is difference of opinion upon the line of
action. Tho important need in tho
great fight is that all who favor juster
financial legislation should stand togeth
er, rather than that they should be
agreed upon all points. There is great
repairing, and then we have voted sub
sidies and bounties to the owners of the
ships for sailing them after they have
been built. For the fishermen and the
meat packers oi the country we give a
rebate of the bounties on the salt which
they use in the product which they are
need of Reform. It cannot be secured if to ship abroad. Even to the producers
there are to be no concessions', and it ot whiskey and tobacco, when shipped
will bo absolutely hindered if those who abroad, we give a rebate, or we refund
desiro Reform fall out among themselves all of the internal tax that has been paid
over tho measures that are to bo adopt- upon those articles,
ed. It would bo a sin and a shame not Now, the farmer can avail himself of
to have harmony among those who at none ol these things, except in the ex-
Kotontioliv nort of unmanufactured tobacco. He
ait Uiaioiiat uviuw mw ouusuuimi; i a. i
agreed. I manufactures nothing, of course, and
ently not very familiar with high lalut
ing suppers. He told the waiter to
bring a cup of coffee and a cup of bouil
lon was brought. He put three large
lumps of sugar in it and a quantity of
cream, and took a big mouthful.
"Woughr and the face he made would
have stopped a clock. "Waiter, didn't
I tell you to bring me coffee? When I
want soup, I'll call for it." He got the
coffee but he did'nt get a dignified ex
pression for about two hours.
Moore County (or Vance.
Special Cor. of State Cuoxicle
At a convention, this day held in Car
thage, Capt. George Wilcox was nomi
nated for tho Senate and W. P. M. Car
rie for the House. Both are Vance men.
N. A. McKeithak.
Sect. 5tb, 1P00.
(Cspt. Wilcox is President of the Al
liance in Moor 3 county and served his
county with great efficiency in the House
in 1885. Editor.
care, ana wini tne com Din
ed advantages o f experi
ence and large purchases.
our stock offers unsurpass
ed inducements. K o u cr Ii
materials will predominate
among nearly every class ot
dress fabrics for this Fall.
We now invite our pat
rons to an early inspection
of this magnificent display, feeling certain
that they will appreciate our effort at show
ing such an assortment of every class of de
sirable Dresa (Jooda, and at such reasonable
prices.
W. H. & R. S. TUCKEB ft CO.,
Kaleiqh, N. C.
FOR RENT.
Tho store of lira. II. A. Towlea, onFavette
yille street, formerly occupied by D, S. SVaitt.
I'OeseSElOn irivoii inimpHintAW -p. .
lara enquire of - J.W.EVANS,
8ept3-lm At F.VBTia A- Martini ov.1
W. G. UPCIIURCII, - - - President.
W. H. DO!D. - - - Sec'v and Treas.
COLIN M. HAWKINS & CO.,
INVESTMENT BROKERS,
331 FAYETTEVILLE ST.,
Raleigh, N. c.
The North Carolina Wagon Company is in WE BUY and SELL on COMMISSION
the second year of its organization. The fac
tory nas been nttca np with tho latest and
best machinery with a capacity of
Ten Wagons Per Day.
BONDS,
ALL CLASSES OF
srocKs,
AND
COMMERCIAL PAPEK.
1
low in
Uiie
Tl.n . 1. . . 1 1
am nas uecn w) iurnisn a wagon at
home the equal of any in this country, and as
T rm .
price, xms naa been secured. We
only the best native -woods, and tho
ti-most care i3 giyen to all the material used.
We confidently and hopefully solicit tho
auuuo an m ueeu oi iarra wagons
suited to our people.
Send for circular and price list.
Address
N. C. WAGON CO.,-
augi&-im , Raleigh. N. C.
We devote speclAl attention to tho
uon of
ncgoti:
TOWNS,
FOli
(
1
Careful attention gi
oriunas lorout-oi-to
lulyi-ev dv fr wk t
)
r
m
9
t
w
hrf
VYS
CITIES,
ItAILWj
am
INDUSTRIAL COMPANIES.
n to the Investment
investors.
ev Sun

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