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The Carolina tribune. [volume] (Raleigh, N.C.) 19??-1940, March 02, 1935, Image 7

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Saturday, March 2nd, 1935
THE CAROLINA TRIBUNE
Published By The
The Carolina Tribune Pub. Co.
RALEIGH, N. C.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One xear z.uu
jjix ikioums si.zo
inrew months ioc
Member Associated Publishers
H. I. Fontellio-Nantou Editorial Director
Eugene Tatum Advretising Mgr.
John A Fouchee Managing Editor
Saturday, March 2nd, 1935
WE WANT THE
TRUTH '■ ~
Up to date we have received no word
from the Committee working in favor of
uie present iorm of city government. When
we suggested a few weeks ago that both
sides should attempt to clarify the issues |
involved and to lay before the colored vot
ers the merits of their respective plans,
the City Manager group made it possible
for every one to examine their claims and
furnished literature designed to educate
our voters.
The proponents of the commissioner
form of government, we are told, rest on
their past performances and on the fact (
that the employment of Negroes under
their regime are sufficient inducement for
our people to vote for retaining the pres
ent form of government.
Personally we think this inadequate and
not sufficient reason for our support.
The time is passed when Negroes were
expected to vote blindly simply because
they are offered a few menial jobs. The
dny of'grape-vine politics among Negroes
is now history. The Negro demands facts,
intelligent reasons, and he has develope
a sense of citizenship which precludes the
sacrificing the good of the whole to the ,
benefit of a few professional politicians.
Wide-awake Negro voters have been
studying the new form of city government
and see nothing to frighten them. To the
argument that Negroes will be disfran
cnisea, this is so absurd ni its puerility, that
it needs no refutation. When the champ
ions 01 me present iorm of government tell
our people that jobs will be taken away
from them; that a city manager will be
employed who will be inimical to colored
people, they are merely reducing their ar
to an absurdity. No one Knows just
wno will oe employed as city manager
W e must urst elect our counciimen oeiore
Ce.ii viniiiK ojl me manager, xfle uivit
chosen as councilmen will undoubtedly in
dicate the type of man that will manage
th- c‘ty. Further, tnere is no reason o
supose that the same commissioners wi
be re-elected to serve trem.
in the absence of any program from
tne supporters of the present form of gov
ernment, we oner tne following lot me
consmerauon oi our people:
.x; rne simplicity of the City Man
ager rian, and the ease wim
which it can be understood.
(2) The elimination of the s
system
me centralization of re yoi. -
biuty.
INegroes tare Quite well in Vurnam,
Cnapei nm, and xtoczy Mount, three
rlta in norm Carolina where
this plan is now in operation.
If, as the supporters of the Ci y
er Plan, insist, this new plan will m
efficient and cheaper governmen
Raleigh, then every Negro voter shouW
study this plan carefully and be public
spirited enough to think first of the go
of the whole community as agains
few emoluments attending the employ
ment of.a handful of Negroes.
LINCOLN PARK & THE
SEWERAGE BILL
We understand that City Attorney
Broughton found himself unable to an
-swer coherently the questions asked him
by members of the Committee of Towns
and Cities, when, he attacked the con
constitutionality of the bill now before the
legislature which provides that the resi
dents of College and Lincoln Parks be re
leased from paying taxes until such time
as water and sewerage are given them.
Our City attorney, we are told, repeat
edly impressed on the minds of the Com
mitteemen that he was not in office at the
time the Lincoln and College Park resi
dents were taken into the city limits. When
asked point blank, just what disposition
has been made of the moneys collected as
taxes from these people, Mr. Broughton
has nothing definite to say. As to why
citizens of the Park should be taken into
the city limits without their consent and
made to pay taxes when they received no
benefits whatsoever, was not of any
special importance to Mr. Broughton. He
merely appeared to challenge the con
stitutionality of the bill.
In our opinion, the city will do well to
relieve these people from paying taxes
as requested in the bill. It seems clear that
under the circumstances, the residents of
College and Lincoln Parks have a good
reason to bring suit against the city for its
flagrant neglect.
Assuming that the bill is unconstitution
al. and taking into consideration the fact
there is not the remotest possibility of the
citizens of Raleigh voting for another
bond issue to install sewer facilities in the
section under discussion, the only other al
ternative is to permit that section to with
draw from the city limits.
With little or no police protection; no
water and no sewerage, the Park enjoys
no advantage whatsoever, not to mention
the taxes paid merely for the privilege of
being considered a part of the city of
Raleigh.
o O o
I
A NEGRO PARK
|
While we take pleasure in compli
menting our city officials for their belated
interest in the welfare of the colored citi
zens of Raleigh, for the bill designed to
furnish a park for Negroes, we see no
reason why this park should be designed
as “A Park for Negroes.”
The maintenance of public parks are
possible through the payment of taxes,
consequently our parks are for the enjoy
nent of all the people irrespective of class
color or section.
It is true that the proposed park is to
de embellished with a swimming pool for
Negro children and that its location wilt
ui the heart of the colored section of
the city. In spite of all this, the classifying
the project as a Negro park savors of
Jim-crowism.
However, we should be thankful for
small favors. Our children have been de
nied swimming facilities too long, for us
to quibble over a name. It is better that we
have a pool under any circumstance than
to have no pool at all.
! We sincerely hope that this move is an
effort to do something long desired for
the Negro residents, and not another one
of those things usually forgotten after the
smoke of election day has cleared away.
EDITORIALS
,The Cftrptina Tribune,
.We Can’t Do Without
Metals
• °o°
If you want to obtain an idea of
'the value of netals look around
your home, office or factory. Prac
tically everything you use in
volves one or more metals—— auto
mobiles and pens, furnaces nad
thumb tacks* kitchen equipment
and sporitng goods.
Every basic industry is vitally
dependent upon metals for making
To The
Colored Voters
Os Raleigh
WE HOPE THAT YOU WILL NOT BE HOODWINKED ON
ELECTION DAY, AND WE ASK YOU TO PUT THESE QUEST
IONS TO THE EXPONENTS OF THE PRESENT FORM OF CITY
GOVERNMENT:
Ask them just what have the commissioners done for colored peo
ple that cannot be done under the City Manager plan of Government.
Ask them whether or not the commissioners have kept their prom
ises to the colored voters of Raleigh.
As Negroes we are not only interested in how many of our people
will secure employment with any group in power at City Hall, but we
should be particularly interested in GOOD GOVERNMENT.
GOOD GOVERNMENT FOR THE CITY OF RALEIGH MEANS:
(1) Efficient handling of the affairs of the city.
(2) The reduction of City Taxes.
(3) Curtailment of wasteful expenditures.
We do not believe that the unheal thy financial condition of the city
can be ascribed to any one individual nor do we lay the blame at the
doors of our present city officials. We firmly believe, however, that
this condition is the outgrowth of our PRESENT SYSTEM OF CITY
GOVERNMENT.
The Negro citizenry of Raleigh will weigh carefully the arguments for
and against a change before voting. We have no doubts but that our
colored voters will vote for the City Manager plan. This plan is the most
democratic and efficient form of m unicipal government in the country.
A FEW POINTS TO BE REMEMBERED ABOUT THIS PLAN
<l> It is simple and is understood by the voters.
(2) It insures capable executives in public business.
(3) Eliminates the spoils system.
(4) Centralizes responsibility.
REGISTER AND VOTE FOR
The City Manager-Council-
Mayor Plan
Sponsored by a ‘
COMMITTEE OF
COLORED CITIZENS
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
and distributing its porducts or ser
vices If the impossible happened,
and we suddenly found ourselves
without metals tomorrow, life
would have to be carried on in the
neolithic manner.
This illustrates the reason for
the importance that is attached to
the domestic mining industry and
shows why far-sighted economists
are so interested in fair and rea
sonable legislative and tax polities
for mining.
WORDS OFTEN MISUSED
oOo
’ Do not say 1 am well-posted on
the subject say well-informed.
Do not say “Each one did the
work their own way? Say “his own
way.”
Do not say ‘‘My book is different
than yours.” Say different from.
Do not say “He is not as skilful
as h's brother.” Say nob so skill
ful as. Use so as-in negative stat-e
ments.
Do not say "a quarter of five •
to express time” Say ‘’quarter to
Page Seven
five,” which means towards fpve.
Vocation is a stated or regular
occupation. Avocation is casual oc
cupation or interest outside of one
regular occupation.
MISPRONOUNCED WORDS
******
Zoological. Pronounce zo-o-loj-ikal
first oas in no, not a* oin tool
Bury. Pronounce the u as e in
‘bet’ not u in fut
Capitulate. Pronounce the sec
ond syllable ‘pit’ not ‘pitch.’
Advertisement. Accent on second
syllable is preferred.

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