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The progressive farmer. [volume] (Winston, N.C.) 1886-1904, April 14, 1886, Image 6

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THE PROGRESSIVE EARMER BMLfm 1886;
6
foctry.
KISSED HIS MOTHER
EBEX E. REXFORD.
She sat on the porch in the sunshine,
As I went down the street
A woman whose hair was silver,
But whose face was blossom sweet ;
Making me think of a garden
Where, in spite of frost and snow,
Of bleak November weather,
Late, fragrant lilies blow.
f heard a footstep behind me,
And the sound of a merry laugh,
And I knew the heart it came from
Would be like a comforting staff
In the time and the hour of trouble.
Hopeful and brave and strong,
One of the hearts to lean on
When we think that things go wrong.
I turned at the click of the gate latch,
And met his manly look ;
A face like his gives me pleasure, 1
Like the page of a pleasant book.
It told of a steadfast purpose,
Of a brave and daring will
A face with promise in it
That God grant the years fulfill.
He went up the pathway singing;
I saw the woman's eyes
Grow bright with a wqrdless welcome,
As sunshine warms the skies.
"B.ick again, sweet mother,"
He cried and bent to kiss
The loving face that was lifted
For what some mothers miss.
That boy will do to depend on,
I hold that this is true
From lads in love with their mothers
Our bravest heroes grew.
Earth's grandest hearts have been loving
hearts
Since time and earth began !
And the boy who kissed his mother
Is everv inch a man !
household.
CHILLED SALT PORK.
Cut thin slices of the thick part
of salt pork and hold on a toasting
fork before a brisk fire to grill; have
a dish of cold water on hand, in
which immerse it frequently while
cooking; put each slice as cooked in
a warm covered pan; when all are
done serve hot.
FRIED PJTATOES.
Peel them and boil in salted
water; do not let them boil until
they are soft. Beat one egg, and
have ready some fine crackers; roll
the potato in the egg, and then in
the crae'eer, and fry in butter until
a light brown, turning frequently
that the color may be uniform ; or
the potatoes may be dropped into
hot lard. In this case a cloth,
should be laid over a plate and the
potatoes should be drained for a
moment in this before sending them
to the table.
TEA BISCUITS.
One quart of sifted flour, 1 cups
of sour or buttermilk, one-half tea
spoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of
soda dissolved in the milk; mix
well ; then roll and beat with a rolling-pin
till the dough is full of blis
ters and cracks loudly ; roll out and
cut with a biscuit-cutter; grease
the top w"th butter; fold one-half
over the other; lay on the baking
tin, so that the biscuits will not
touch. Dip the fingers in milk and
rub the top of each, to glaze them;
bake in a quick oven.
CREAM PUFFS.
One-half pound of butter, three
fourths pound of prepared flour,
six eggs, two cups of warm water.
Stir the butter into warm water;
set over the fire -and stir to a slow
boil. When it boils, put in the
flour; cook one minute, stir con
stantly. Turn into a deep dish to
cool. Beat the eggs lightly yolks
and, , white separately and whip
into cooled paste, the whites last.
Drop in great spoonfuls upon but
tered paper, not so near as to touch
or run into each other; bake about
ten minutes in a quick oven until
they are of a golden brown.
CORN CAKES. : .
For a family of six, sjald one
quart of meal, just enough to mois
ten thoroughly (to scald too much
makes the cake difficult to bake);
when cool, thin with milk or water,
or half-and-half, to the consistency
of ordinary griddle cakes; add two
beaten eggs, a tablespoonful of flour
and a little salt, or one egg and a
teaspoonful of baking powder, or
scald oriel pirit oft mealj omit the
flour, and, &dd pne pint (6f! bread
crumbs, well soaked, one teaspoonful
of melted butter and ! lard,' one egg
and a little salt; thin with milk or
water. Still another way is to
scald the meal, making a stilt' dough,
add a little salt and set to rise over
night in a warm place. In the morn
ing the surface will be cracked, indi
cating lightness. Bake on a well
greased griddle in thick cakes.
Serve hot, split and spread with
butter.
SOFT RAISIN GINGERBREAD.
One cup each of sugar, butter,
molasses, sour cream or milk; cream
is best. One scant cup of seeded
raisins, one teaspoonful of mixed
mace and cinnamon, and one of
ginger, one rounded teaspoonful of
soda, sifted twice with four full
cups of flour; two eggs. Hub
sugar and butter to a cream, then
beat in the molasses and spice,
working it until it is several shades
lighter than when you began. Add
the eggs, whipped light, the milk,
at last the flour. Stir well, put in
the raisins, dredged thickly and beat
two minutes upward. Bake in
shallow ''cards" or in pati pans.
! Eat warm with cheese.
APPLE PUDDING.
Make a biscuit crust, i. e., one
quart of flour, three small tea
spoonfuls of baking powder, butter
or lard the size of an egg, teaspoon
ful of salt (less if butter is used),
and milk enough to make a soft
dough. Fill a deep baking-dish
with sliced apples, sweetened with
molasses and flavored with cinna
mon, nutmeg and pounded dried
lemon peel. Cover with the crust
and bake in a 'moderate oven, (the
oven door may be left open a few
moments when the pudding is put
in, and closed as soon as the crust
rises. Serve with hard sauce or if
eggs are plenty, use egg sauce, to
make which, rub one small cup of
butter and two cups of sugar to a
cream, then stir in three eggs beaten
very light, and two tablespoonfuls
boiling water and flavor with lemon
or wine.
PIGEON RAGOUT.
' For six persons take four pigeons;
after cleaning them cut them in
halves and put them in a saucepr n
with a little salt and two table
spoonfuls of butter; cover the
saucepan tight and place it over a
moderate fire; after a little time,
turn the pieces of pigeon on the
other side ; take a piece of butter
the size of an egg and a tablespoon
ful of flour and brown them to
gether; remove the pigeons from
the saucepan and mix the flour and
butter with the sauce in which the
birds were cooked; add a pint of
bouillon, half a lemon cut in slices,
from which the seeds must be taken
out, and a little pepper, salt and
powdered cloves. When the sauce
boils, add six or eight truffles cut in
pieces or the same number of mush
rooms, and simmer until they are
nearly done; then put the pieces
of pigeon in the sauce and simmer
for fifteen minutes. A few capers
are an improvement.
STALE BREAD.
This can be utilized in so many
ways that the young housekeeper
need never be annoyed when her
supply of the staff is greater than
the demand. To convert it into a
breakfast dish when tired of toast,
cut the bread into slices an inch
th'ck, remove the crusts and uneven
ends; fry these fragrants (the crusts
and broken pieces) in a slow oven
and pulverize with the rolling pin.
To one pint of sweet milk add a
well-beaten egg and a little salt. Dip
each slice in t'.ie mixture and mois
ten well, then into the pulverized
crusts and fry in sufficient boiling
fat to cover the bread. Sugar can
be added to the milk, if taste sug
gests it, or when d:ne, dusted on
the slices with a little cinnamon.
Shake each slice well as you lift it
from the pan to free it from every
particle of grease. If hurriedly or
carelessly put in the dish without
observing this precaution, the bread
will absorb the grease, and, in con
sequence, be uneatable. To be good
the slices should be well browned,
hot and dry when served.
SWEETENING CASKS OR BARRELS.
Half a pint of vitrol mixed with
a quart of water, and the mixture
poured into the barrel; roll it about.
Next day add one pound of chalk
and roll again. Bung down fir
three or four days, then rinse well
with hot water. -
GEMS OF THOUGHT.
Observe among all the principal
figures in Shakespeare's plays, there
is only one weak woman Ophelia;
and it is because she failed Hamlet
at the critical moment, and cannot
in her nature, be a guide to him
when he needs her most, that all
the bitter catastrophe follows. And
though there are three wicked
women among the principal figures
Lady Macbeth, Regan and Generil
they are felt at once to be frightful
exceptions to the ordinary laws of
life; fateful in their influence in
proportion to the power for good
they have abandoned. Ruskin.
A man is spent by his work ;
he will not lift his hand to save
his life; he can never think more.
He sinks into deep sleep, wakes
with ronewed youth, with hope,
courage, fertile in resources and
keen for daring adventure. Em
erson. Love is the most dunder-headed
of all the passions; it never will lis
ten to reason. The very rudiments
of logic are unknown to it. " Love
has no wherefore," says one of the
Latin poets. Bithrer Lytton.
The root of all benevolent ac
tions is filial piety and fraternal
love. Confucius.
I've noticed it often among my
own people around Snowfield, that
the strong, skillful men are often
the gentlest to the women and
children ; and it's pretty to see 'em
carrying the little babies as if they
were no heavier than little birds.
And the babies always seem to like
the strong arm best. George Eliot.
Beauty in a modest woman is
like fire or a sharp sword at a dis
tance; neither doth the one burn
nor the other wound those that
come not too near them. Cervantes.
That which causes us to lose
mot of- our time is the repugnance
which we naturally have for labor.
Dry (I en.
Irresolution on the schemes of life
which offer themselves to our choice,
and inconsistency in pursuing them,
are the greatest cause of all our
mill appi ness. A ddison .
A law may be reasonable in
itself, although a man does not
allow it, or does not know the
reason of the lawgiver. Swift.
Nothing is rarer in literary his
tory than a scholar who confesses
that he has been refuted in anything.
Jean Paul.
All great art is the expression
of man's delight in God's work, not
in his own. Buskin.
I have heard people talk of
what they could do, what they
knew when they were at school,
as though they were on the sum
mit in school days, and had been
going down hill ever since. Rev. C.
L. Guild.
The best advertisement of a
workshop is first-class work. The
strongest attraction to Christianity
is a well-made Christian character.
T. L. Cuyler.
One should believe in marriage
as in the immortality of the soul.
Balzac.
EATING LEMONS.
A good deal has been said through
the papers about the health fulness
of lemons. The latest advice is
how to use them so that they will
do the most good, as follows: Most
people know the benefit of lemon
ade before breakfast, but-few know
that it is more than doubled by tak
ing another at night also. The
way to get the better of the bil
lious system, without blue pills or
quinine, is to take the juice of
one, two, or three lemons, as appe
tite craves, in as much ice-water
as makes it pleasant to drink without
sugar, before going to bed. In the
morning, on rising, at least half an
hour before breakfast, take the juice
of one lemon in a goblet of water.
This will clear the system of humor
arid bile with efficiency, without
any of the weakening effects of
calomel or congress water. People
should not irritate the stomach by
eating lemons clear.
BORAX.
A teaspoonful of borax put in the
la?t water in which clothes are
rinsed will whiten them wonderfully.
Pound the borax so it will disso!vi
easily. This is especially good to
remove the -yellow that time grves
to white garments that have been
laid away two or three years,
Southern Head
quarters for
High-Class, Prize
Winning PLYMOUTH HOCK.
Spnd for Gr.nd Illus
trated Circular and Price
Ife- List tor 18-6.
2 THOMPSON BROS.,
if. Lin col n ton. N. C.
A. C. VOGLER-
UNDER TAKER,
- COFFINS. CASKETS,
Ladies' Gentlemens' and Childrens' BURIAL
ROBES, always on hand. All orders for
Coffins or Hearse attended to promptly.
i-Cstlaa. Street, - - Sa-leaao., C-4-3m.
Respectfully, A. C. VOGLER.
MOTE 01 STOCK!
-o-
MY BULL "BUCK," two and a half years old.
very kind, fine form, Sire " Joe Donovan,"
Full Blood Jersey ; dam Full Blood Devon, of
the celebrated Holt Stock at Haw River,
WILL STAN I) AT HIS STALL,
on my Farm, During the Season.
CALF INSURED FOR $2.50.
S TERMS STRICTLY CASH.
J. C. SHUTT.
3-3m.
For Sale.
PURE and HIGH GRADE GUERN
SEY BULL CALVES. The latter
will be sold at veal prices if taken early.
The first order gets the best calf.
Address CLOVERDALE FARM,
Raleigh, N. C.
Dr. Rich'd H. Lewis, Prop'r. 5-lm.
W. ,3. WYATT & g
AND DEALERS IX
HEAVY AND FANCY
DURHAM, X. C.
J" Consignments of all kinds.
Country Produce solicited.
1 3m
Umatilla, Orange Co., Fla
Fine Hunting and Fishing. Prices Moderate.
Special Arrangements Made by the Month.
J. A. MITCHENER, Piop'r.,
Late of Johnston Co., N. C.
Kgr Land Agency Office in Building. Im
proved and Unimproved Land for Sale. 4:tf.
Edwards, Uroughlon & Co,,
RALEIGH, A. (,'.,
PRINTERS. BOOK-BINDERS
AND
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS,
ESTABLISHED 1872.
THE MOST COM P L ETE
IW USE OF THE KIND
IN THE STATE.
Prepared for all Kinds and Styles of
PRINTING OR BINDING.
Keep tle Only Complete $todk of
Iehl Blhnk.
mercantile" railroad, bane
AND LEGAL PRINTING.
We solicit orders and guarantee
prompt attention. Address,
EDWARDS, BROUC-HTOH CO,.
Printers and Binders,
l-f. Raleigh, N. C.
ri H i
ITS!
a
mil .
i ii i
- w
Hi
mmm
THOROUGH BRED
AND TROTTING HORSES ;
JERSEY CATTLE ;
SOUTHDOWN SHEEP ;
: BERKSHIRE HOGS ;
AND BRONZE TURKEYS.
Young stock for sale by
S. D. ALEXANDER.
5-6m. Charlotte. X. C.
REMEMBER !
You will always find at the
Big Coffee Pot "
Largest aid Best AsrtUt:ck of
cm
Cooking u Heating Stoves,
in this section.
All Stoves guarantee! to give perfect
satisfaction.
ROOFING AND1GUTTERING,
and all kinds of TIN and SHEET IKON
WORK. Also PAINTING TIN
ROOFS done with neatness
and care.
TOBACCO FLUES
a specialty.
jggGive us a call and be convinced.-
Very Respectfully,
GIERSH, SKNSEMAN' & CO.,
Sign -'Big Coffee Pot,"
Main Street, - Salem, N. C.
4:3m.
Seed Oats! Seed Oats!!
o
Bla-k, Wliito and Rust Proof
Ortts for Spriny: Sowing,
on hand and for sale by
F & U. FIUES,
3-lm. Salem, X. C.
CAROLINA CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY,
OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT, (
Wilmington, N. C., Sept. 27, 1885.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
ON AND AFTER THIS DATE, THE FOL
lowing Schedule will be operated on this
Railroad :
PASSENGER.M ATL AND EXPRESS TRAIN:
DAI L V EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
( Leave Wilmington at 7.00 P. M.
No.lJ Leave Raleigh at 7.35 P. M.
(Arrive at Charlotte at 7.30 A. M.
(Leave Charlotte at 8.15 P. M.
No. 2. Arrive at Raleigh at 9.00 A. M.
(Arrive at Wilmington at 8.25 A. M.
LOCAL FREIGHT Passenger Car Attached.
Leave Charlotte at 7.40 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at 5.45 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at tf.15 A. M.
Arrive at Charlotte at 4.40 P. M.
Leave Wilmington at .45 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at .5.00 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at 5.30 A. M.
Arrive at Wilmington at .5.40 P. M.
Local Freight between Wilmington and Lau:
rinburg Tri-weekly leaving Wilmington on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Leave
Laurinburg on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sat
urdays. Passenger Trains stop at regular stations on
ly, and Points designated in the Company's
Time Table.
SHELBY DIVISION, PASSENGER, MAIL,
EXPRESS AND FREIGHT.
Daily except Sundays.
lyjy. o Leave Charlotte at..... 8.15 A. M.
xo..3. Arrive at Shelby at 12-15 P. M.
vA-i Leave Shelby at 1.40 A.M.
A Arrive at Charlotte at 5.40 P. M.
Trains No. 1 and 2 make close connection at
Hamlet with R. & A. Trains to and from
Raleigh.
Through Sleeping Cars between Wilmington
and Charlotte and Raleigh and Charlotte.
Take Train No. 1 for Statesville, Stations on
Western N. C. R. R., Asheville and points
West.
Also, for Spartanburg, Greenville, Athene,
Atlanta and all points Southwest.
L. C. JONES, Superintendent.
W. F. CLARK, Gen'l Passenger Agent.
Cape fear & Yadkin Valley Railway Co.
Condensed Time Tabl No, 13.
TRAIN NORTH.
CD -
I
Arrive. Leave.
Bennettsville.. 8:2 ) a. m.
Shie Heel a:4a. m. 9:50 a.m.
Fayetteville 12:0) m. 12:25 p. m-
Sanford V:lp. in. 2:35 p.m.
Ore Hill 3:43 . m
Liberty 4:37 p. in
Greensbor o ti:'H p. m.
. Dinner at Fayetteville.
TRAIN SOUTH.
Arrive. Leave.
Greensboro... 9:5 a.m.
Ijitjcrt'j IX 5 n td
Ore Hill 12: 0 m.
Sanford 1:2 p. in. 1:45 p. m.
Fayetteville 3:"yi p. m. 4:00 p. m.
Shoe Heel... 6: 5 p. ni. t:15 p. m
Bennettsville 7:30 p. m. jrr :
Dinner at sanford.
Freight and Passenger T ain leaves U
n 'ttsvilleTuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays
at 2:0 p.m., arriving at sh Heel at 4:3) p. m.,
and at Fayetteville at 8 p: m.
Leaves Fayetteville on Tuesdays Thurs
days and Saturday at 6: iO a. m.. shoe Heel at
10 a.m., and arrives at Bennei tsville at. 12m.
Freight and Passenger Train North leaves
Fayetteville da ly at 8 a. in., (connecting at
Sanford with Freight and Passenger Trains to
Raleigh), leaving Sanford at 11:30 a. m.,and
arriving at Gree isboro at 5:40 p. m.
I. eaves Greensboro dally at 5a. m.; leaves
sanford atJl:15a. m. and arrives at Fayette
ville at 2:40 p. m.
JOHN M. ROSE,
General I essenger Agent
W. M. . DUNN,
Gen. SuDeiintendent
y V.'

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