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The progressive farmer. [volume] (Winston, N.C.) 1886-1904, June 23, 1886, Image 3

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THE PROGUKSSl tJil
mm
mi u
MX
THEYJWENT A-FISHINQ. ;
One morning, when Spring was in her
.Tteehs-r-;! - ) !,,..
A morn to a poet's wishing, v ; ; :? ; .
All tinted in delicate pinks and greens
Miss Bessie and I went fishing. :!
vh I .' .'. ; . '
I in my rough and easy clothes, ; - !
With my face at the sunshine's mercy ;
She with her hat tipped down to her nosei
And her nose tipped vice versa.
I with my rod, my reel and my hooks,
And a hamper for luncheon recesses j
She with the bait of her comely looks,
And the seine of her golden tresses. ,
So we sat down on the sunny dike, .
Where the white pond-lilies teeter,
And I went to fishing like quaint old Ike,
And she like Simon Peter. ;
All the noon I lay in the light of her eyes,
And dreamily watched and waited j
But the fish were cunning and would not
rise,
And the baiter alone was baited.
And when the time for departure came,
The bag was flat as a flounder j
But Bessie had neatly hooked her game
A hundred and eighty pounder.
ORIGIN OF STATE NAMES.
New York Named by the Duke
of York under cover of title given
by the English crown in 1664. New
Jersey So called in honor of Sir
George Carteret, who was Governor
ot the Island of Jersey, in the .Brit
ish Channel. Pennsylvania From
William Penn, the founder of the
new colony, meaning Penn's
Woods." Delaware In honor ot
Thomas West, Lord de la Wrare,who
visited the bay and died there in
1610. Maryland After Henrietta
Maria, the Queen of Charles I. ol
England. Virginia So called in
honor of Queen Elizabeth, the " Vir
gin Queen," in whose reign Sir Y al
ter Raleigh made the first attempt
to colonize that region. North and
South Carolina were orginally in one
tract, called Carolina, after Charles
IX. of France, in 1601. Subsequent
ly, in 1665, the name was altered
Georgia So called in honor of George
II. of England, who established a
colonv in that region. Florida
V
Ponce de Leon, who discovered that
portion of North America in 1519,
named it Florida, in commemoration
of the day he landed there, which
was Pasqua de Fiores of the Span
iards, or u Feast of Flowers," other
wise known as Easter Sunday. Ala
bama Formerly a portion of Mis
sissippi Territory, admitted into the
Union as a State in 1819. The name
is of Indian origin, signifying "Here
wo rest. Mississippi Formerly a
portion of the Province ot Louisiana
So named in 1800 from the great
river on the western line. The term
is ot Indian oncrin, meanincr tne
l7 ' '
" long river." Louisiana From Loim
XIV. of France, who from some time
prior to 1763 owned the Territory.
ArkansasFrom " Kansas," the In
dian name of "smokv water, with
the French prefix arc, bow. Ten
nessce Indian name tor "the river
of the big bend," i. e., the Missis
sippi, which is its eastern boundary
Kentucky Indian for "at the head
of the river. Uhio Fro:n the In
dian, meaning "beautiful," previously
applied to the river which traverse?
a great part of its borders. Michi
gan Previously applied to the lake;
the Indian name ot a hsh-weir. bo
called from the fancied resemblance
of the lake to a fish trap. Indiana
So called in 1802 from American
Indians. Illinois From the Indian
"illini " men, and the French suffix,
"ois," together signifying "tribes of
men. Wisconsin Indian nametoi
"wild rushing channel." Missouri-
Named in 1820 from the great branch
of the Mississippi which flows
through it. Indian term meaning
"muddy." Iowa Indian term mean
ing the "drowsy ones." Minnesota
Indian for "cloudy weather. Can
fornia The name given by Cortes,
the discoverer of that . region. He
nrobablv obtained it from an old
Spanish romance, in which an imag
inary island of that name is described
as abounding in gold. Oregon
According to some from the Indian
Oregon, "Eiver of the West." Others
consider it derived from the Spanish
"oreganoo," wild marjoram, which
grows on the Pacific Coast. Ameri
can Cultivator. '.
An Iowa cattle grower dehorned
125 cattle with no bad results, and
regards it a great economy. He
thinks that horns do $1,000,000 dam
age annually in Iowa alone.
A CRITICAL 'MOMENT r AT AN.
V;
tietam; : ;
; From Gen. Longstreet?8 account
of "The' Invasion of Maryland," in
the ii June Century, n we quote this
anecdote: ; Thus the' -battle ebbed
and flowed with terrific slaughter on
both sides, ? V- ' n ; . ; ; ;.
"The Federals; fought with won
derful bravery and the Confederates
clung , to their ground t with", heroic
courage as hour after hour they were
mown down like grass. The' fresh
troops: - of McClellan literally tore
into shreds the already ragged; army
of Lee, but the ; Confederates never
gave back. j : r ;
"I remember: at one time they
were surging up against us .with
fearful ; numbers. I was occupying
the left ovr by Hood, whose ammu
nition gave Out. Soon after the Fed
erals moved up against us in great
masses. . , -: i; '"
"We were under the crest of a
hill occupying a position that ought
to have been held by from four to six
brigades. The only troops there
were Cooke's regiment of North
Carolina infantry without a cart
ridge. As I rode along the line with
my staff I saw two pieces of the
Washington artillery (Miller's bat
tery), but there were not men enough
to man them. The gunners had been
either killed or wounded. This was a
fearful situation for the Confederate
center. I put my staff officers to the
guns while I held their horses. It
was easy to see that if the Federals
broke through our lines there, the
Confederate army would be cut in
two and probably distroyed, for we
were already badly whipped and
wore only holding our ground by
sheer force of desperation. Cooke
sent me word that his ammunition
was out. I replied that he must hold
his position as long as he had a man
left: He responded that he would
show his colors as long as there was
a man alive to hold them up. Wo
loaded up our little guns with canis-
, ..I ! 1 . ' . 1
tor ana sent a rattle oi nan lino tne
Federals as they came up over the
crest of the hill. ' :
"There was more business to the
square inch in that little battery
than in any I ever saw, and it shot
harder and faster and with a super
human energy as it seemed to real
ize that it was to hold the thousands
of Federals at bay or the battle was
lost. So warm was the reception we
irave them that they dodged back
behind the crest of the hill. We
sought to make them believe we had
many batteries before them instead
only two little guns. As the Fed
erals would come up they would see
the colors of the North Carolina
regiment waving placidly and then
would receive a shower of canister
We made it lively while it lasted. In
the meantime (ren. Chilton, (xen
Lee's chief of staff, made his way to
me and asked, 'Where are the troops
you are holding your line with? I
pointed to my two little pieces and
to Cooke's regiment and replied,
There they are; but that regiment
hasn t a cartridge.
"Chilton's eyes popped as though
they would come out of his head; he
struck spurs to his horse and away
he went to Gen. Lee. I suppose he
made some remarkable report, al
though I did not see Gen. Lee again
until night. After a little a shot came
across the Federal front, plowing
the ground in a parallel line. An
other and another, each nearer their
line. This was from a battery on D.
H. Hill's line.
"This enfilade fire, so distressing
to soldiers, soon beat back the at
tacking column."
THE HANGING GARDENS OF
BABYLON.
Verv earlv in the history of the
world neonle saw the use and beauty
of gardens As far back, indeed, as
we have any trace ol men, we nna
that they were in the habit of culti
vating flowers and shrubs, and so
decorating and arranging nature as
to supply a pleasant spot whither
they could retreat and enjoy bright
colors, rich shady foliage, and sweet
perfumes.
In all the oldest nations of which
we read in Egypt and Assyria, in
China, in India, in Greece the art
of gardening was carried to a high
state of cultivation. To natural beau
ties were added the graces of the
painter, the sculptor and the archi
tect. Temples were built in the cen
ter of lovely gardens ; frescoes adorn
ed the walls of stone summer-houses
and of lofty towers ; nestled amid
the shrubberyprising from flower
beds, placed at the crossing of paths,
were to be seen statues of gods and
heroes of cupids; nitises and 'graces.
Among the most famous of -the
ancient gal-dens, the ruing Of which
vasttiesV and grandeur were ' " the
Hanging Gardens of Babylon:'1 These
have a special iriterest for those who
are familial with the Bible,5 in which
Babylon! the mighty city over which
the warlike kings ot Assyria ruled,
'referred ! to. ,Ur; ';, ' '
1 ' : The Hanging Gardens?,of Babylon
w:ere " one of the seven 1 wonders of
the world ;' and truly,' if we can judge
anything ' byj the remains of them
which still exist, they well deserved
a place r among the marvels of the
olden time. , . ,
The story of their origin' is ah in
terestmg one. n is saia tnat mere
once lived a great Assyrian king, of
vast wealth and power, who was de
votedly attached to his wife. Every
thing that she asked of him he was
wont to grant. The moment that
she formed a wish, it was gratified
Now this fair queen came from
one of the most beautiful valleys of
Persia, in which she was born and
reared. ' She had been accustomed to
live, amid the most romantic scenery,
to " delight : in avenues of trees and
banks of flowers. .
But Babylon was a dull place, and
around it were nothing but bare
fields and dreary heaths. So . the
queen, though1 she had every luxury
which money, could bring, tired of
the uninteresting views trom her
palace windows, and remembering
the lovely scenes of her childhood,
she pined for them, and begged the
king to make for her a garden which
should remind her of her native
valley.
The king hastened to gratify her ;
and setting an army of laborers,
some of whom he called from Persia,
to work, in the , course of time the
wilderness about Babylon was" con
verted into the magnificent Hanging
Gardens.
They were constructed on the
sides of some sloping hills not far
from the royal palace. Ot course, as
they were intended for the pleasure
of the queen, they must be made on
the most splendid scale. Yastness
was the ancient idea of magnificence.
Not long ago, the royal palace at
Nineveh was explored, and found to
cover a space larger than that cov
ered by Boston Common and the
Public Garden put together.
So the Hanging Gardens were
made to cover a large expanse. They
were adorned with noble edifices
and the most skilfully carved stat
ues and pillars. In form, the gar
dens mere a vast square. From the
bottom of the hills on which they
rose they were reached by broad
flights of stone stens leading from
terrace to terrace, the terraces rising
one above another in a series. At
the foot of the hills were noble arch
wajs, with paved roads, and sculp-
tureu ngures oi great size umug uju
walls on either side; and beneath
these archways the Assyrians might
pass with ease on the backs of their
largest elephants.
At the end of each terrace, just
before the next stairway, was either
an arch or a pavilion supported by
massive pillars; while at the tops of
,i 4 x U
tne staircases were to ue seen im
mense vases filled with flowers, and
vines which hung down their sides,
and carved figures ol lions and tigers.
It was upon the broad terraces,
which rested on gigantic columns,
that the gardens were laid out with
lavish hand.
THINGS WORTH KNOWING.
The number of silos, in Great
Britain in 1884 was 610, and in 1885,
1183.
Canadian frogs' legs are worth
seventy-five cents, per pound m tne
New York market.
Immense quantities of canned
goods have been ordered from this
country by .England ot late.
It is estimated that the annual
cost for picking the cotton crop : of
the Southern States is $4U,UUU,uuu.
The exports of this country to
South America amount to $n4,uuu,
000 vearlv. The exports of England
to Brazil for the same period amount
to 336,000,000.
UHATILLA HOUSE,
Umatilla, Orange Co., Fla.
Fine Hunting: and Fishing. Prices Moderate
Special Arrangements Made by the Month.
J. A. M1TCHKNER, Prop'r.
: , Late of Johnston Co., N. C.
Land Agency Office in Building. Im
proved ana ummprovea iana lor aie. nu.
RICHMOND AND DANyiLLE RAILROAD CO. ,
. PIEDMONT? AIR-LINE ROUTE..- ' f J
Condensed Schedule in effect May 2, '86.
. ; ?, Trains Run by 75;Meridian Time
0 UTII BOUND Dai l y.
- No: 50. '
No.'52.r
Lve
.New York
Philadelphia..........;.
Baltimore..
"Washington.........
Charlottesyille......
Lynchburg......:.......,
Richmond..........
...12 00 night
... 7 20 a m
0 50 "
.3 40 pm
j
t
a '
i
4 .
'
t .
It
H
it
.
it
It
it
It
D (JO "
9 00
11 00 "
?00am
o 15 "
2 OO- J" -405
"
...11 15 "
3 50 pm
6 15 "
Burkeville
KeyesTille ........,
5 2U , " ,
... 6 05 "
r6 20 "
... 9 25 '
.-11 50 a m
4 43
4 59
8 04
Drakes Branch ......
Danville ......
Goldsboro.
Raleigh ,
5 00 p m
6 07 " .
Chapel Hill...............
HillBboro ........
X-rm lXfl IL ............ ........
,4 55 "
6 47 " :r
II 21 "
Greensboro...
Salem.......,
High Point...
Salisbury
Concord
Charlotte ,
Spartanburg,
Greenville....
Atlanta.......
9 50 "r
'5 55 "
10 19 ,UJ
11 23
11 59 , "
1 00 pm
3 84 "
4 49 "
10 40 "
.M6 55 ! " :
...1155 "
... 1 10 am
.... 1 57 " .
... 3 00 "
. 5 sa " .
7 14 "
... 1 40 pm
Ar.
NORTHBOUND DaiXy
No. 53.'
8 40 am
2 30 pm
3 43 "
6 25 "
7 25
8 01 "
9 08 "
9 "
1 17 am
Lve Atlanta 5 45 nm .
Ar. Greenville ....11 32 nm
Spartanburg 12 45 am
Charlotte... 4 05 "
Concord 5 01 "
Salisbury 5 48 "
High Point 7 04
Greensboro M 7 35 "
S&Igixi IX 40
Hillsboro 11 54 "
Durham.. ...........12 28
Chapel HU1...M ....1 00
Raleigh............. l 35
Goldsboro .. 4 40
pm
4 -
iT28pm
2 42 am
3 05
3 57 "
Danville 9 42
Drakes Branch ......12 20 pm
am
Jiveysvine .. 12 3o " ,
Burkville 1 20 " '
Richmond 3 37 " ,
Lynchburg 12 45 "
Charlottesville ......... 3 15 "
Washington..-. .. 8 45 " '
Baltimore .11 25 "
Philadelphia.... 3 00 a m
New York..:..."........... . 6 20 "
Daily except Sunday.
7 00
2 10
4 25 "
9 45 "
10 03 "
12 35 pm
3 20 "
SLEEPING-CAR SERVICE.
On trains 50 and 51, Pullman Buffet
Sleeper .between Atlanta and New York.
On trains 52 and 53, Pullman Buffet
Sleeper between Washington and New
Orleans, Washington and Augusta Pull
man , Sleeper between Richmond and
Greensboro.
Through tickets on sale at principal
stations to all' points.
For rates and information apply to any
agent ot the company, or to '
C. W. CHEARS,
As.4t. Genl. Pass. Agent.
E. B. THOMAS,
Genl. Manager. ' i i
RICHMOND, VA. . : -
-:o:-
"PvON'T BUY AN ORGAN OR PIANO
JlJ until you see
Prof. C. L. WILSON
Agent for Ludden & Bates, Savannah, Ga
' JBSTOftice opposite Post Office, "
14-3m. Winston, N. CJ
Southern Head
quarters fur
High-Clafs, Prize
i Winning
TLVMOUIH mi
Send for Gr ind 111 us
trated Circular and Price
List for 18-6. .
5 THOMPSON BROS..
tf. Llncolnion. N. C
VALLEY MUTUAL
Life AssoQiation I
OF
STAUNTON, VA.
-:o:
ST A TEMENT JAN. 1st, 1886 :
' . . ASSETS :
United State Bonds.... $18,000.00
Bonds and Mortgages... 85,000.00
Property , 13,978.80
Cash on hand... ...... 13,87.58
liabilities:
Assessments Paid inAdvance...$ 805.63
Due Assessment Accounts........ 6,785.73
This Company was organized as re
cently as September 3, 1878, but the
management and character of the Com-
pany has been such as to secure and
enjoy the support of such of our leading
business men as uol. A. 15. Andrews,
Mai. Robt. Bingham, Mr. R. T. Gray,
Hon. A. C. Avery, Circuit Court Judge j
Rev. Dr. C. T. Bailey, and other repre
sentative men throughout the btate. .
Rates for Insurance lower than in any
first-class reliable Company.
J. F. HYATT,
Wadesboro, N. C,
General .Traveling Agent for the State.
C. Wi VOGLER,
Local Agent,
Salem, N. C.
je"Terms and assessments may be
found at the ofiice of the Progressive
Farmer, in Winston.
15-tf. ' C. W. yjOGLEIl, Agent.
A CARD.
Mr F H Hyatt, Special Agent for the Valley
Mutual L.ife Association, oj ytrgtnta .
Sib : Permit me to express my appreciation
of the promptness and business-like manner
with which you paid the lAie policy or 53,ww on
the life of John P. Secrest, of Monroe, Union
mntv. The action of voor Company In thus
promptly adjusting this claim must commend
it to tne iavor oi au nonest peopie.
H C ABHCRAPT,
Guardian.
Winston, N C, April 29, 1S88.
J HISS- MMfil ! !
r.lUYJ.Sl'. u Wt'l .' J ' 'I All '? 'J) :i.
GRAY BLOCK,
WINSTON, N. C:
-:o:
THE LARGEST RETAIL ' D 1 Y
i Goods, Millinery .and ; Shoe . House
AAA VAAV Vt a
PIONEERS OF :LQf PRICES!
And the guiding-stars for square and
honest dealing. v . 7
We show styles that are, Captivating,
Enchanting and Fascinating. - ;'. ; 1
, ,Do not be bull-dozed , by dealers I who
shout big : things and claim : to show
what they cannot , produce, but : come
direct to Headquarters.. , . ' ;i
j 8-Sole agents for the New High Arm
Vertical Feed Davis Sewing Machine. '
All mail orders will receive prompt
attention. Samples sent on application.
RYTTENBERG; BROS.'
15-3m.
TIME IS MONEY
:(o): 1
Every Farmer should have a good, re
liable Watch. I, You cali-6avein one year
the cost of a good Watch by always
knowing the exact time. , You can al
ways find a good assortment of- . r , : ,
i WATCHES,':;
CLOCKS, JEWELRY, SPECTACLES,
j .''' - i ' "
, &C, &C , &C, ; ; ; .
Watchmaker and Jeweler, : : " ' '
Main Street, - Winston," IT. 0.
. , -EafjcssiaTa - ;
done promptly, and all work warranted.
. 4-3m. '
CAROLINA CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY,
. .. .. j
OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT; 7
Wilmington, N. C., 8eptL27, 1885.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
ON AND AFTER THIS DATE, THE FOL
lowing Schedule will be operated on this
Railroad: .r
PASSENGKR,M AIL AND EXPRESS TRAIN:
: DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
Leave Wilmington at..... ..7.00 P. M.
Leave Raleigh at.... ...7.35 P. M.
Arrive at Charlotte at.. ........ .-7.30 A. M.
f Leave Charlotte at ............ ..:..A15 P. M.
No. 2.-! Arrive at Raleigh at.............9.00 A. M.
(Arrive at Wilmington at...... ..8.25 A. M.
LOCAL FREIGHT Passenger Car Attached.
Leave Charlotte at... ............... ...J.....7.40 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at 5.45 P, M.
Leave Laurinburg at .0.15 A. M.
Arrive at Charlotte at 4.40 P. M.
Leave Wilmington at...... 0.45 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at .5.00 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at.............. .......5.30 A. M.
Arrive at Wilmington at.,.............w.5.40 P. M.
Local Freight between Wilmington and Lau:
rinburg Tri-weekly leaving Wilmington on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Leave
Laurinburg on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sat
urdays. Passenger Trains stop at regular stations on
ly, and Points designated in the Company's
Time Table. v!
SHELBY DIVISION, PASSENGER, MAIL,
EXPRESS AND FREIGHT. ;
Daily except Sundys.: : , ,
Leave Charlotte at 8.15 A. M.
xTa t Arrive at Shelby at. ..12-15 PrM.
Vrt y Leave Shelby at 1.40 A. M.
0'- Arrive at Charlotte at... 5.40 P. M.
Trains No. 1 and 2 make close connection at
Hamlet with R. & A. Trains to and from
Raleigh.'
Through Sleeping Cars between Wilmington
and Charlotte and Raleigh and Charlotte.
Take Train No. 1 for States vi lie, Stations on
Western N. C. R. R.. Asheville and points
West.'-:.- : - - -
Also, for Spartanburg, .Greenville Athens,
Atlanta and all points Southwest.
L. C. JONES, Superintendent.
W. F. t CLARK, Gen'l Passenger Agent.
Cape Tear & Valiej Railvay Co.
Condensed Time Table No 13:
TRAIN NORTH. ' f f
Arrive.
Leave.
Bennettsvllle......
Shoe Heel-
.- u. m.
y:'K) a.m.
12 p, m.
J.-iip. m.'
v:4t a. m.
12.-00 m.
'1:1 p. m.
3:13 p. m.
4::t7 p. m.
o.-OO p. m.
Fayetteville....
Sanrord
Ore Hill
Liberty
Greensooro
Dinner atr Fayetteville.
TRAIN SOUTH. '
Arrive.
Leave.
GreenKboro .......
Liberty
Ore H1U.....
11? a. m.
13J p. m.
8:V p. m.
6.6 p. ni.
70 p. m:
117 V III.
i: p. m.
4 .-00 p. m.
p. m.
Fayetteville
Shoe Heel...
Bennettsvllle ...
Dinner at Sanford. ,
Freight and Passenger T ain leaves Ben
nettsvllle Tuesdays Thursdays And Saturdays
at 2:30 p. m., arriving at Shoe Heel at 4:30 p. m.,
and at Fayetteville at 8 p. m.
Leaves Fayetteville on Tuesdays Thurs
days and Saturdays at 6:. a. m Shoe Heel at
10 a.m., and arrives at Bennettsvllle at 12 m.
Freight and Passenger Train North leaves
Fayetteville dally at 8 a. m., (connecting at
Sanford with Freight and Passenger Trains to
Raleigh), leaving Sanford at 11:30 a. m.,and
arriving at Greensboro at 5:40 p. m..
Leaves Greensboro dally at 5 a.m.: leaves
Ssnford at 11:15 a. m. and arrives at Fayette
villeatl:40p.m. ; "
JOHN M. ROSE, ,
General Passenger Agent.
IT. M. S. DUNN, : :. ::y: .;:
Gen. Superintendent

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