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The progressive farmer. [volume] (Winston, N.C.) 1886-1904, June 30, 1886, Image 3

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THE PROGRESSIVE FARMER; JUNE '30, 5 1886.
3
SMILE WHENEVER YOU CAN.
When things don't go to suit you
And the world seems upside down
Don't waste your time in fretting,
But drive away that frown ;
Since life is oft perplexing,
?Tis much the wisest plan
To bear all trials bravely
And smile whene'er you can.
Why should you dread the morrow,
And thus despoil to-day?
For when you borrow trouble
You always have to pay.
It is a good old maxim,
Which should be often preached
Pon't cross the bridge before you
Until the bridge is reached.
You might be spared much sighing
If you would keep in mind
The thought that good and evil
Are always here combined.
There must be something wanting,
And though you roll in wealth
You may miss from your casket
That precious jewel health.
And though you're strong and sturdy
You may have an empty purse
(And earth has many trials
Which I consider worse) ;
But whether joy or sorrow
Fill up your mortal span,
'Twill make your pathway brighter
To smile whene'er vou can.
A SIMPLE CURE FOR GAPES.
A Charlton (New York) poultry
raiser says the easiest and best rem
edy for gapes in chickens is caustic
lime, either air or water slaked. It
should be dry and powdered. Take
the chicken in the left hand and
open the mouth, keeping it upright,
and then drop a pinch of dry lime
into it. Hold in this position a few
seconds until it is obliged to breathe,
when it will inhale some of the lime;
then let it go. One application of!
the lime in this manner has cured,
in my experience, every case of
I gapes, some of them in the last
siaires. .iier irymtj a uuiuuer 01
remedies I find this the best of all,
as it is simple and sure, and does
not injure the chicken. The lime
kills the worms.
THE CHARACTERISTICS
OF FOWLS.
The following are the breeds that
do not sit. They lay eggs entirely
white in colov: 1 The Houdans, Leg
horns, Black Spanish, Hamburgs,
Polish, 3Iinorcas, and Andalusians.
The best table fowls, for quality of
flesh, without regard to market ap
pearance, are the Games, Houdans,
Langshans, Dorkings, Wyandottes,
Plymouth Kocks and Brahmas. The
most persistent sitters are the Co
chins, Brahmas, Plymouth Rocks,
Wyandottes and Dominicks. The
fowls that can be the most easily
confined are the Brahmas, Cochins,
Wyandottes, Plymouth Rocks and
Dorkings. The fowls that require
high fences in order to closely con
fine them are the Hamburgs, Leg
horns, Black Spanish, Andalusians,
Games and Houdans. The above is
intended to classify each breed in
proper order, though it is not given
as entirely correct.
FEEDING FOR FLESH OR EGGS.
When flesh is tho desirable object
to be attained, and the greatest num
ber of pounds the point on which
the profit hangs, feed tho grains
which contain the elements that
make fat. Indian corn contains
seven per cent, of fat-production ele
ments, while oats contain only six
percent. Now, with the difference
of only one per cent, in favor of In
dian corn, any ten-year old child can
see that it would be folly to try to
obtain the best results in fattening
poultry by feeding oats. But if a
thrifty condition is most desirable,
feed largely with oats, because oats
contain two per cent, more of the al
buminoids, or muscle-producing ele
ments, than corn. Wheat, bran and
skim-milk are each chemically con
sidered, quite close to the white of
an egg, which fact suggests their
use in the list of food for laying hens,
natch the condition of your laying
"ens very closely, and keep them
0nly in good working condition,
never extremely fat, and you can
Produce eggs plentifully at all times
and seasons of the 'year. In cold
leather we may feed a large pro
portion of the fat-producing grains,
because a large per cent, is con
sumed in the system, like fuel in a
stove, to keep the animal warm, and
all the internal, as well as external
circumstances that help to keep the
animal warm, tend to success in the
undertaking; but in warm weather
give liberally of cooling, fresh vege
tables, and less Indian corn. Poultry
World.
DISEASES OF CHICKS.
Any information regarding young
chicks cannot be too frequently given.
The gapes cause greater loss than
anything else, and so far the old
remedy of pulling out the worms
with a horse hair still prevails, but
if a teaspoonful of turpentine be
mixed with a pint of corn meal, and
the meal moistened and fed as dough,
it will be found the most valuable
remedy known, though not strictly
infallible.
Lice is the next greatest obstacle.
The first thing to do when the chicks
are afflicted with lice is to thorough
ly clean up the premises. Then
dust the chicks, over every portion
of their bodies, with Persian insect
powder, and finish by placing a drop
of lard on top of the head of each
chick and around the vent, but never
grease a young chick on any other
portion of the body, as it is almost
certain death to them. Bowel dis
eases are caused by the chicks tak
ing cold, and not always by the food,
as many suppose. Should signs of
diarrhoea appear place the hen and
chicks in a warm, dry place, and be
careful that the hen does not have
more chicks than she can cover.
Feed them on rice boiled in milk,
and allow it to become cold and
hard before feeding it. Should the
chicks be weak and refuse to eat,
two drops of paregoric on a bread
crumb forced down the throat of
each will serve to invigorate them.
If young chicks are kept warm and
dry, on clean locations, and fed reg
ularly, they will remain in perfect
health and grow rapidly. Farm,
Field and Stockman.
SELECTING THE CALF FOR THE
FUTURE COW.
When the dairyman can success
fully select those calves that will at
some future time turn out to be the
best milkers, he will have accom
plished a great result in dairying,
lie cannot do so with certainty, yet
there are some things to be observed
that may greatly assist him in that
respect. The more effeminate look
ing the young heifer the better, and
although the escutcheon is not a
sure indication of quality, yet a good
cow always has a well defined
escutcheon. The skin is the best
indicator. If it is soft and velvety
you may rest assured that if the
calf does not excel in quality of milk,
that it will possessess a valuable
qualification in some direction. Leav
ing aside the outer marks, the dairy
man should observe them when they
are feeding, and endeavor to select
those that eat plenty of food and
show correspondingly good effects
therefrom. Such calves will always
give satisfaction when they are ma
tured. Farm, Field and Stockman.
TO IMPROVE HAY.
In the process of drying grass into
hay most of the volatile oils which
give green herbage its delicate flavor
and odor are lost. Some farmers
have found that putting clover and
other grasses in barns while rather
green and mixing with them enough
dry straw to absorb moisture, not
only preserves the flavor in the hay,
but a portion is communicated to the
straw, making it much better for
milch cows. It is possible that far
mers may yet take to sowing sweet
vernal grass for the sole purpose of
flavoring their winter's supplies of
dry hay or straw. Spirit of the Farm.
TO KILL INSECTS.
A shallow pan partially filled with
water and a small amount of kero
sene oil poured on the top, should be
set in tobacco fields, a lighted lan
tern to be in it on a brick or block
of wood. The light attracts the to
bacco fly, and the pan of water and
oil soon holds him. By destroying the
fly the tobacco and cucumber worms
never come. Salisbury Watchman.
The cherry is about the only
fruit tree which can be recommended
for shade in pastures along road
sides, as the hardy varieties of cher
ries are not affected by the tramp
ing of stock or passing of vehicles,
which would prove injurious to most
other fruit trees. .
HOW MUCH GRASS SEED TO THE
ACRE? '
Young farmers and beginners often
want to know how much grass seed
ought to be sown on an acre of
ground. To such we give a few fig
ures that it will be well to remem
ber: Of clover seed the books and
catalogues say sow eight or ten
pounds; we advise at lest twelve
pounds. Of mammoth clover seed
sow at least ten pounds. Of timothy
seed sow 18 to 20 pounds to the
acre if alone ; if with clover, sow one
half as much. Kentucky blue grass
seed should be sown at the rate
of twenty-eight pounds to the acre
if alone and for pasture, but if for
lawn, it will require a good deal
more say three bushels or forty
two pounds, and when white clover
is sown with it, put three pounds of
of that in. Of red top sow twenty
five pounds to the acre. Of meadow
oat grass sow twenty-five pounds to
the acre. Spirit of the Farm.
To utilize feathers of ducks,
chickens and turkeys, generally
thrown aside as worthless, trim the
plumes from the stump, enclose them
in a tight bag, rub the whole as if
washing clothes, and you will secure
a perfectly uniform and light down
excellent for quilting coverlets and
not a few other purposes.
Umatilla, Orange Co., Fla.
Fine Hunting and Fishing. Prices Moderate '
Special Arrangements Made by the Month.
J. A. M1T0HENER, Prop'r.,
Late of Johnston Co., N. C.
Land Agency Office in Building. Im
proved and Unimproved Land for Sale. 4:tf.
JERSEY & GUERNSEY
BULL. CALVES FOR SALE
At farmers' prices. All entitled to regis
tration. Full particulars on application
to II. T. BAIINSON, M. D.,
20-1 m. Salem, N. C.
Patent Corn Shelter & Separator.
TIILS MACHINE
IS SIMPLE,
Strong, Durable.
shells easily and
RAPIDLY.
Twelve Sheiiers pack
ed in a barrel for ship
ment. Retail price, $i.
Farmers, merchants,
clubs and agents, write
for circulars and testi
timonials. A. H. PATCH, Manufacturer,
20-Gm. Clarksville. Tenn.
L
ASHCRAFT& OWENS,
Winston, 1ST. O-,
-DEALERS IN
Pure Drugs and Patent Medicines,
READY-MIXED PAINT,
WHITE LEAD, OILS
AND VARNISHES,
TRUSSES AND SHOULDER
BRACES.
Orders by Mail Promptly Attended to.
20-Iy. ,
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY !
:o: ;
Tie Knoxville Furniture Company
HAVE
ESTABLISHED IN WINSTON
k Branch House
FROM THEIR LARGE MANUFAC
TURING ESTABLISHMENT,
Where you can get
SETTER-MODS FOR LESS HONEY
Than ever known in Winston.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
to be latest style and first quality. .
JBT'Remember the place : Near the
old jail. ; : :
, A. KENNEDY, Jr.,
20-6 m. - Manager.
TILL A
mm
I'M
MACHINE
AND
TANNERS
OILS
RICHMOND AND DANVILLE RAILROAD CO.
PIEDMONT AIR-LINE ROUTE.
Condensed Schedule in effect May 2, '86.
Trains Run by 75 Meridian Time.
SOUTHBOUND Daily.
No. 50.
No. 52.
3 40 pm
6 03 "
9 00 "
11 00 "
3 00 am
Lve New York 12 00 night
Philadelphia 7 20 a m
Baltimore 9 50 "
Washington 11 15 "
Charlottesville 3 50 pm
Lynchburg 6 15 "
Richmond. 3 25 "
Burkeville 5 26
Keyesville 6 05 "
Drakes Branch .. 6 20 "
Danville 9 25 "
Goldsboro Al 50 a m
Raleigh , 5 00 p m
Durham 6 07 "
Chapel Hill 4 55 "
Ilillsboro 6 47 "
Greensboro 11 21 "
Salem .. 6 55 "
High Point ..11 55 "
Salisbury 1 10 a m
Concord 1 57 "
Charlotte 3 00 "
Spartanburg 5 56 "
Greenville 7 14 "
Atlanta 1 40 pm
5
15 "
2
4
4
00 "
05 "
43 "
59 "
04 "
4
8
9 50 "
5 55 "
10 19 "
11 23 "
11 59 "
1 00 pm
3 34 "
4 49 "
10 40 "
Ar.
NORTHBOUND Daily
No. 51.
Lve Atlanta 5 45 pm
Ar. Greenville 11 32 pm
" Spartanburg 12 45 am
" Charlotte 4 05 "
" Concord 5 01 "
" Salisbury 5 48 "
" High Point 7 04 "
" Greensboro 7 35 "
" Salem ll 40 "
" Hillsboro 11 54 "
No. 53.
8 40 am
2
30 pm
3
6
43 "
25 "
7
25 "
01 "
8
9 08 "
9 43 "
1 17 am
" Durham 12 28
" Chapel Hill 1 00
pm
" llaleigh l 35 "
" Goldsboro 4 40 "
" Danville 9 42 am
" Drakes Branch ..12 20 pm
" Keysville 12 38 "
" Burkville 1 20 "
" Richmond 3 37 "
" Lynchburg 12 45 "
" Charlottesville 3 15 "
" Washington 8 45 "
" Baltimore ll 25 "
" Philadelphia 3 00 a m
" New York 6 20 "
Daily except Sunday.
11 28 pm
2 42 am
3 05 "
3 57 "
7 00 "
2 10 "
4 25 "
9 45 "
10 03 "
12 35 pm
3 20 "
SLEEPING-CAR SERVICE.
On trains 50 and 51, Pullman Buffet
Sleeper between Atlanta and New York.
On trains 52 and 53, Pullman Buffet
Sleeper between Washington and New
Orleans, Washington and Augusta. Pull
man Sleeper between Richmond and
Greensboro.
Through tickets on sale at principal
stations to all points.
For rates and information apply to any
agent of the company, or to
C. W. CHEARS,
Asst. Genl. Pass. Agent.
E. B. THOMAS,
Genl. Manager.
RICHMOND, VA.
& PIAHOS!
-:0:-
"PkON'T BUY AN ORGAN OR PIANO
I J until you see
Prof. C. L. WILSON,
Agent for Ludden & Bates, Savannah, Ga
JgggOftice opposite Post Office,
14-3m. Wixstox, N. C.
Southern Head
quarters for
High-Class, Prize
Winning PLYMOUTH SOCK.
Send for Grind Illus
trated Circular and Price
List for 18;6.
THOMPSON BROS.,
tf. Lincolnton, N. C
VALLEY MUTUAL
OF
STAUNTON, VA
-:o:-
STATEMENT JAN. 1st 1886
assets:
United State Bonds ..$18,000.00
Bonds and Mortgages 85,000.00
Property 13,978.80
Cash on hand 13,827.58
liabilities:
Assessments Paid in Advance... $. 805.63
Due Assessment Accounts 6, 1 85.73
This Company was organized as re
cently as September 3, 1878, but the
management and character of the Com
pany has been such as to secure and
enjoy the support of such of our leading
business men as Col. A. B. Andrews,
Maj. Robt. Bingham, Mr. R. T. Gray,
Hon. A. C. Avery, Circuit Court Judge;
Rev. Dr. C. T. Bailey, and other repre
sentative men throughout the State.
Rates for Insurance lower than in any
first-class reliable Company.
J. F. HYATT,
Wadesboro, N. C,
General Traveling Agent for the State.
C. W. VOGLER,
Local Agent,
Salem, N. C.
Jg-Terms and assessments may be
found at the office of the Progressive
Farmer, in Winston.
15-tf. C. IF. VOGLER, Agent.
A CARD.
Mr F H Hyatt, Special Agent for the Valley
Mutual Life Association, of Virginiar-
Sir: Permit me to express my appreciation
of the promptness and ousiness-like manner
with which you paid the Life Policy of $3,000 on
the life of John P Secrest, of Monroe, Union
county. The action ot your Company in thus
promptly adjusting this claim must commend
it to the favor of all honest people.
II C ASHCRAFT, '
Guardian.
Winston, N C, April 29, 1886.
QliMB
Life Association, 1
urn mi
GRAY BLOCK,
WINSTON, N. C.
-:o:-
THE LARGEST RETAIL DRY
Goods, Millinery and Shoe House
in the btate.
PIONEERS 0? LOW PRICES !
And the guiding stars for square and
honest dealing.
We show Styles that are Captivating,
Enchanting and Fascinating.
Do not be bull-dozed by dealers who
shout big things and claim to" show
what they cannot produce, but come
direct to Headquarters.
BgSole agents for the New High Arm '
Vertical Feed Davis Sewing Machine.
All mail orders will receive prompt
attention. Samples sent on application.
KYTTENBERG BK0S.
15-3m.
TIME IS MMY
. :(o):
Every Farmer should have a good, re
liable Watch. You can save in one year
the cost of a good Watch by always
knowing the exact time. You can al
ways find a good assortment of
WATCHES,
CLOCKS, JEWELRY, SPECTACLES,
&C, &C
W V VOGXcEft'S---
Watchmaker and Jeweler,
Main Street, - - "Winston, IT. C.
xarE-ajnEaxaiTa
done promptly, and all work warranted.
4-3m.
CAROLINA CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY,
OFFICES "OF SUPERINTENDENT, f
Wilmington, N. C, Sept. 27, 1885. 5
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
ON AND AFTER THIS DATE, THE FOL
lowing Schedule will be operated on this
Railroad:
PASSENGER.M AIL AND EXPRESS TRAIN:
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
(Leave Wilmington at 7.00 P. M.
No.lJ Leave Raleigh at 7.35 P. M.
(Arrive at Charlotte at .....7.30 A. M.
("Leave Charlotte at 8.15 P. M.
No. 2. Arrive at Raleigh at 9.00 A. M.
(Arrive at Wilmington at .8.25 A. M.
LOCAL FREIGHT Passenger Car Attached.
Leave Charlotte at 7.40 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at 5.45 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at 6.15 A. M.
Arrive at Charlotte at ... ..4.40 P. M.
Leave Wilmington at 6.45 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at .5.00 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at .5.30 A. M.
Arrive at Wilmington at -5.40 P. M.
Local Freight between Wilmington and Lau:
rinburg Tri-weekly leaving Wilmington on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Leave
Laurinburg on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sat
urdays. ; .
Passenger Trains stop at regular stations on
ly, and Points designated in the Company's
Time Table.
SHELBY DIVISION, PASSENGER, MAIL,
EXPRESS AND FREIGHT.
Daily except Sundays. !
o Leave Charlotte at 8.15 A. M.
- 1 Arrive at Shelby at 12-15 P. M.
. Leave Shelby at 1.40 A. M.
io.4. j Arrive at charlotte at 5.40 P. M.
Trains No. 1 and 2 make close connection at
Hamlet with R. & A. Trains to and from
Raleigh.
Through Sleeping Cars between Wilmington
and Charlotte and Raleigh and Charlotte.
Take Train No. 1 for Statesville, Stations on
Western N. C. R. R.f Asheville and points
West.
Also, for Spartanburg, Greenville, Athens,
Atlanta and all points Southwest.
L. C. JONES, Superintendent.
W. F. CLARK, Gen'l Passenger Agent.
Caps Fear & Yadkin Valley Railway Co.
Condensed" Time Table No, 13,
TRAIN NORTH.
Arrive.
Leave.
Bennettsville....
Shoe Heel ,
Fayetteville
Sanford .....
Ore Hill .....
Liberty
Greensboro
8:20 a. m.
9:50 a. m.
12:25 p. m.
2:25 p. m.
9:40" a. .m.
12:00 m.
2:15 p. m.
3:43 p. m.
4:37 p. m.
6:00 p. m.
Dinner at Fayetteville. j i
TRAIN SOUTH. ' '
Arrive.
Leave.
Greensboro
9:51 a. m.
Liberty .
11:05 a. m.
Ore Hill ...
Sanford .
Fayetteville
lS.fOm.
1:21) p.
3:50 p.
6M p.
7:30 p.
m.
m.
m.
m.
1:45 p. m.
4:00 p. m.
6:15 p. m. ,
Shoe Heel......
Bennettsville
Dinner at 8anfard."
Freight and 5 Passenger Tiain leaves Bf-n-nettsvilleTuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays
at 2:30 p.m., arriving at Shoe Heel at 4:30 p.m.,
and at Fayetteville at 8 p. m;
Leaves Fayetteville on Tuesdays, Thurs
days and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m.. Shoe Heel at
10 a.m., and arrives at .Bennettsville at 12 m.
Freight and Passenger Train North leaves
Fayetteville daily at 8 a. ra.. (connecting at
Sanford with Freight and Passenger Trains to
Raleigh), leaving Sanford at 11:30 a. m.,and
arriving at Greensboro at 5:40 p. m.
leaves Greensboro daily at 5 a. m.; leaves
Snford at 11:15 a. m. and , arrive? at Fayette-:
vllleat2:40p.m. ' '
. . JOHN M. ROSE, .
. i ' General Passenger Agent.
W. M. H. DUNN, .

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