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The progressive farmer. [volume] (Winston, N.C.) 1886-1904, August 04, 1886, Image 5

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THE". TO)(SSJ;YK JftVTtMERl pA;MSW' k 'Am
; :n i frTHJ i .-.iMiS-'il-.u
Meeting of County Co3imissioners.
At a meeting of the County Commission
ers on Monday the following named gen
tlemen were appointed supervisors of
the public roads, under.the Watson ;Road
Law, and were duly qualified :
Abbott Creek Township, G. H. Idol ;
Bethania i ;
Broad Bay
Kernersville
LewisviUe:
! 1N,'F. Sullivan:
C. Rothroek ;
J. S. Ray ;
i, J. P. Binckley ;
J. Y. Standifer;
u
Middle Fork,
Old Richmond
Old Town . V
Salem Chapel
South Fork'
Vienna .5 ! '
Winston
Blue's Creek
a
u
. ",
....
. E. L. Reed;
T.N. Marshall;
Wrri. Ebertj
j , ,E C. Dull;
R. J. Reynolds;
Under the law a tax of eight cents
was levied on each $100 of taxable prop
erty, and twenty-four cents on each poll.
Refreshing rains throughout this
section within the last few days have
greatly revived vegetation and the droop
ing spirits of our. farmers. The wheat
was only fair, the oat crop was good so
of clover and the grasses, and the corn
crop, while it will fall below an average
crop perhaps, yet it will be ample to
meet the demands. Tobacco will be neces
sarily a short crop, because, first, of the
decreased acreage planted and, second,
because of the very great damage done
it by the rains. But "all in all" the
farmers of the . piedmont section have
cause to be thankful. We commend to
croakers and growlers the deplorable
condition of their brother farmers in
Western Texas, where they have had no
rain for over one year, and who are now
flying with their families from that dreary
and drought-stricken section.
Mr. II. E. Fries, of Salem, has built
a substantial silo on his farm and begins
this week to fill it, using his milo-maize
and clorer first. It is 20 feet long, 10
feet deep and 8 feet wide. He will use
a Ross Feed Cutter with a horse power
0 cut the food.
7 ' His neighbor farmers should visit his
farm and see it. Mr. Fries is thoroughly
HHcal, and is one of our most progres
sive, successful and intelligent citizens,
and we trust that the example of such
! 'gehtlemf n as (Mr. Fried and Dri Bahrison
(who wni soon nave nissiio compieiecn
m a matter of such, great importance in
farm husbandry, will stimulate a great
many of our farmers to adopt this valua
ble and economical method of storing
food for their stock. It has passed the
line of experiment and by long and
repeated., tesis
in i-ttll limates in b the
United State:
. lias ueeii uttuiuuirttieu. iu
t 1 J A-vl i.
be a success.
UNDBRPKAiTiN;.We ( were shown
some beautiful fejdmerisjof tiling tthe
'Benbow House,4 Greensboro, last' week.
It is made in Guilford county, from Guil
ford county clay, and we do not hazard
much in saying that for utility and beau
ty of finish,' it Tcannbt be excelled in this
country. ' Five r hundred thousand miles
of it should be in use to-day on farms in
North Carolina. Nothing would give a
greater return for the outlay, if it were
used intelligently. There is scarcely a
single farmer in our State that could not
use it profitably. We hope its manufac
ture will be greatly enlarged to meet the
demand for it.
7
The concert last Thursday evenin,
in the Opera House for the benefr
bt. .Paul's P. E. Church was a verpieas-
ant entertainment, the music jflne
. ... .
and
the sinsrinff verv cood. Theftrogramme
was well rendered throughput, while theJQ
solos by Mrs. Hellen, Mrs. Jbries ana
Miss Swift were gems of vocal sweetness.
The audience was notf as large as it
notf as
should have been, but (t was an appre
ciative one. ( ' I
We had the pleasure of a call last
Friday from Mr. C. D.Smith, geologist
and mineralogist, of Franklin county, a
member of the State Board of Agricul
ture, who was on his return from Stokes
county, where he; had been, at the in
stance of theBoard,' to inspect the coal
deposits in that county. He will return
and give the subject further attention in
the fall. .
We clip the following from the Char
lotte Observer:
"Mr. J. T. Bagwell, late of Winston,
has rented the new brick residence built
by Capt. T. R. Robertson, on West Trade
street, and vrill become a resident of
Charlotte. He will move his family here
next week. Mr. Bagwell will study law,
and hopes to get a license to practice
from the Supreme Court the coming
winter."
. Mr. Charles A. Reynolds is looming
up as the Republican - nominee' for Con
gress iiUhe 5th .District. .
i I j lBdi froW the graXj ready-maote
clothing is being offered at auction in
Winston there must have been an over
stock of it on hand.
Mr. George T. Foust; for many years
a prominent merchant of Winston, and
a much esteemed citizen, died at his resi
dence'in tliicit" last -Saturday"" Vught.
?Iis remains 4 wem interred Monday
.morhing'in ihitonS Cemeterj'?. i 1
Within the past week the firm of
Williamson & Smith have shipped num
bers of hogsheads of tobacco to Liverpool,
England; Bremen, Germany; Coving
ton, Ky. ; Detroit, : Mich., and Chicago,
111. It will be seen from this that Win
ston tobacco travels a considerable dis
tance in Various directions. "4 ' '
JOTTINGS BY THE WAY-SIDE.
The, 28th ;pf July will bo a mem
orable day in the history of the Bap
tistjd9UominaJ.ionJn,thisjStatQN . h
The Baptist Orphanage Aesocih
tion held its annual meeting at the
Orphanage, at Thomasville. The
Reidsyillo Baptist Sunday school and
tbq jDui-ham kch66l came ' in "early
with loaded trains of happy children,
young people and grown folk, aggre
gating . about'-1,400' people. And
from all points of the compass came
wagons, buggies, carriages and other
vehicles, loaded with 'people and
baskets. Abundant water, supplied
by several springs in the grove, good
shade for the lovers, (and there were
many,) good seats for those who
came to learn, and every condition
that could be devised by the thought
ful superintendent for the pleasure
of the crowd was found at hand.
Over 2,200 people, happy, cheerful
and hopeful, mingled together. A
very able sermon by Rev. Dr. J. L.
Carroll, of Asheviile, prayers by Bev.
B. Cobb and Rev. J. R. Gwaltney,
made up the religious; exercises.
The songs of praise were led by the
little orphans. Speeches, able and
full of interest in the afternoon by
Rev. Dr. T. H. Pritehard, Rev. Dr.
John Mitchell, and Rev. . Dr. J. D.
Huff ham. y : i, 1'! j.
Since the meeting of the Baptist
State Convention in November last,
$5,500 have been contributed for the
support of the Orphanage, and a
collection was taken which amounted
to 8773.
Dr. jHuff haru, , .stated , ?that v( four
houses fiad been;;ereeted that the
corner stones of four others would
be laid that day all the expenses
had been paid and 35 children were
present and the number was con
stantly increasing. And all this
work had been done without the
eraplo3frrietil pf ag0nejesj It was the
spontaneous vork-of oenevoleht pien
and wbmeh thronghbht tne whole
State.
We confess- thatfwe were among
those friendsof the Oxford Asylum
at the beginning of this enterprise
who apprehended a conflict in the
work that possibly the existence of
the two institutions might in some
way impair the grand work, but
these apprehensions have long since
vanished. There is enough work of
the kind in our State to enlist the
sympathy, the benevolenee and the
pockets of all the Masons, and of all
the ChristianQlWelToliiinations.
If condutritT the spirit of Chris-
tianjjeirevolence and charity there
be no conflict, and we believe
that as opportunity is enlarged, just
in the same proportion will benevo
lence be developed.
THE FARMERS' CONVENTION.
The indications are that the Far
mers' Convention, to organize a
county farmers' club, which is to
meet in Winston next Saturday,will
be largely attended by representa
tive farmers of the county. Word
has gone out all along the line, and
from all the reports we receive in
terest in it is wide-spread. If any of
the clubs have not yet selected dele
gates, let them do so at once and see
that they are properly represented.
In neighborhoods where no clubs
have yet been organized, let good
men come and help to put the ball
in motion. Let it be such a conven
tion as will reflect; credit on the
farmers of Forsyth, one of the most
progressive counties in the State.
We are requested to ask the sec
retaries of the various clubs in the
countv to brine: with them on Sa
urday a1 complete list of the mem
bership of their respective clubs as
doubtless this will be absolutelyAee-
essary to determine the basis 91 rep
resentation.
A SPECIAL OFFER.
Remember 1 1 that - the Progressive
Farmer and the Patch Corn Sheller
(price $3)is offered to you for four dollars
only. The ,;President ; of Sandy Ridge
Club has this to say of the Sheller, s !
WiNSTOx, Nl C, , June 19, 1886:
CoU L. Li ' jFVAv At your " request I
took the Patch Corn Sheller and Sepa
rator and tested : it. '. I am so well satis
fied with it that I want to keep it and
pay you for it. It is decidedly the best
corn sheller for 'the price haf I have
ever seen, and in my -judgment it should
have a large sale among our farmers.
! : ; .--'! . !' Respectfully,
, , .tTH, Reich.; -
Louis ' Bagger" ' Solicitors of
Pa tents, Washington, write us that thirty
three patents, bearing date of July 27th,
were granted to citizens of the Southern
States, among-them one -to J.-T, Riteh,
of, Charlotte. NA C.,4for jcultivator, , and
onteltoFrank YMgtm. J31iza&etH VCity,
N. C, for life-preserving float.
t- fj rtphfZancl jMis tfie title, of a
sixteen-page mbnthlyi issued at Asheviile,
by Atkinson & Cocke, the main feature
of which will be to make known the
attractions and .Vesoin'ic'ea j of : Western
North Carolina." It is a very neat, cred
itable and valuable publication
Winston l&phMto ptavhet.
! 1 ; '. A 1 : i - "
CORRECTED WEEKLY' AT THE WAREHOUSES.
Breaks ; larger, last week; than $ at any
time for month - past, the majority , of
stock being medium and f pommon. All
good,"1 sbuiidj f stveeV, otesiraSle tobaccos
selling well. Good and fine wrappers
are scarce and selling at good figures.
Lugs Common, sound, $ 3.00 to$ 4.00
Medium,...:..:...'. r 4.50 to 6.00
" Good, 7.50 to 10.00
" Fine, 12.50 to 15.00
Leaf Common,.. $ 4.00 to $ 5.50
u Medium,.L:i...iUi. ! 6.50 tx 9.00
11 Good,... 10.(X) to 14.00
Cutters. Good,.!...;. ....$18.00 to $20.00
" Fine, 22.00 to 25.00
Rich, WaxeV JFiiiRs:..$I2.0() to $18.00
Wrappers Common,.... $18.00 to $22.50
. , Medium 25.00 to 30.00
t tiA Good,lJ.Ui.. 35.00 to 45.00
Fiie,8gi.v.;-50.00 to 60.00
ii
The prices of many of the articles1, enu
merated below aretnateriallyaffected by
this table is corrected weekly by ome of
out largest and most reliable Healers, and
oun readers may accept the quotations as
approximately correct: - ,,,
Vfheatt white, per bushel,.. M $1.00 to 1.25
l red, 8 to 1.10
Corn per bushel. (50 to f5
Uornyvieai;per nunarea, 1.40 to t.00
Oate.ber bushel..... ..
bo to 6
80 to 1.00
1.00 to 1.50
75 to 1.U0
1.25 to 1.40
2.25 to 3 75
75 to 1.00
12 to 20
10 to 15
20 to 4 25
6 to 7
8 to 10
12 to 15
8 to 10
20 to 25
10 to 18
8 to 10
8U to 1.00
8 to 10
40 to 60
75 to 1,00
Beani, per bushel, colored
" I " white........
Peas, " 4
FIhx seed, per nunarea,.
Flour,
Hay.
......... .........
Butter
fresh, per lb.,.
in ferkins, per lb...
Beeswax, per lb....................
Tallof, "
Country Meat, hog round, per lb.,
Bams, per id., .
Shoulders, per lb.,...
it
Chickens, -..
! serine..
Eggs, (per doz.,
Hon er, strained, per gallon........
"f In comb, per lb
IrishPotatoes, new crop, per bush
a c
Potatoes, sweet .
DRIED FRUIT.
There is no dried fruit yet on the mar
ket, but the following are prices offered,
as quoted by Messrs. Hinshaw & Bynum :
Blackberries, 0 to
Quarter large cut apples,.. 1 to
Bright sliced apples......... 1 to
Fancy sliced apples,. 0 to
Extra Fancy sliced apples, 2 to
Half peaches, 2 to
Quarter peaches, 1J to
Bright peeled peaches, 0 to
Fancy peeled peaches, 0 to
5
U
2
3
21
2 .
5
7
8
cts.
Ixtra Fancy peeled do,... U to
igh Point Classical Inslilute,
:o:
ICHOOL OF HIGH GRADE
FOR ROTH SEXES. E
-:o:-
.H -
F VE COURSES 0F; STUDY. ;Teach
iers' and Commercial Courses are
spec ialties. Tuition, $1.50 to $4.00 per
mor th. Music $3.00. .
Board in private families $8.00 to
$1000; in clubs. $4.00 to $6.00.
ext session begins August 'Z6. ieo,
'or Catalogues, Circulars or Monitors.
adflress t S. H. THOMPSON,
Principal, High Point, N. C.
r23 3m.
potji xu:x iao2.
ALEM FEMALE ACADEMY,
. SALEM, K C.
EIGHTY THIRD ANNUAL SES
sion begins September 2nd, 1886.
For Catalogue apply to
Rev. E. RONDTHALER, D. D.,
Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL,
24 6w. Principals. :
1
Mil
WILL
0B1FIE!. TELL
H. 1.5117.1.. -w
NEXT
m Happy,
WEEK.
R. STEVENS,
Winston, N. O.
26-3m.
;e "Forest College.
-:o:
WITH A FACULTY OF NINE
, Professors, with an Invested En
dowment of $100,000, with large and
convenient Buildingsr with a central and
healthful Location, with a Library of
8,000 volumes, with Appliances for teach
ing the sciences, with a well equipped
Gymnasium, with two Literary Societies
of great efficacy, with a system of Discip
line which allows perfect liberty but no
license invites the patronage of the
young men of North Carolina.
FALL TERM BEGINS SEPT. 1st-,
SPRING TERM, JAN. 15th.
EXPENSES :
Tuition per Term of five months,....$30 00
Incidental Fee, 3 00
Library Fee,. 2 00
Room (unfurnished) for each occu
pant, per Term, 3 00
For special information, or catalogues,
address Rev. C. E. TAYLOR,
23 till sept. 1. Wake Forest, N.C.
University of North Carolina.
-:o:-
THE NEXT SESSION
AUGUST 26th.
OPENS
FIFTEEN PROFESSORS OFFER A
wide range of instruction in Litera
ture, Science and Philosophy. The law
School and the Department of Normal
Instruction are fully equipped. Special
higher training in all the departments is
provided for graduates of the University
and of other Colleges free of charge.
Select Library of 20,000 volumes j Read
ing Room of 114 Periodicals. Total col
legiate expenses $88,00 a year. Board
$8.00 to $13.50 per month. ' ; Sessions
begin last Thursday in August. For full
information, address v i .
PRES. KEMP P. BATTLE, LL. D.,
. , Chapel Hill, N. C.
July 14, 1886. ; 23 lm.
NEW BOARDING HOUSE.
Having' leased the winston
Hotel I am now prepared to furnish
Board and Lodging, with nice, comforta
ble Rooms. 1 ' ; ;
Board by meal, day or week, at reasona
ble prices. R. A. WOMMACK.
.July 24. 24 3m.
Patent Corn Sheller & Separator.
THIS MACHINE
IS SIMPLE,
Strong, Durable..
shells easily axd
RAPIDLY.
Twelve Shelters pack
ed in a barrel for ship
ment. Retail price, 83.
Farmers, merchants,
clubs and agents, write
for circulars and testi-
timonlals. . j
A. H. PA TCH, Manufacturer.
20-6m. Clarksvujle. Tens.
FREEHOLD, N. J., j
i ; Dealer, Trainer and Exporter. J
ATTENDS ALL NEW YORK SALES
of Holstein and Jersey Registered Cat
tle. Animals purchased and bargains
guaranteed. . .
Good and satisfactory references.
J5!orrespondence solicited.
22-lm.
dibw uu mam
Mill
Those looking for an Institution whose advantages are equal to the best, yet
who.e charges are the lowest, should not fail to procure and exaihine a Catalogue of
THOMASVILLE FEMALE COLLEGE. ;
Each patron may choose any desired Course of Study; yet the faculty of ten
members in sufficient to meet the demand. . , ;
The Charges are very Low, varying according to studies, but never exceeding
the amount named and agreed upon, there being no incidentals, even Medicine
and Medical Attention being included. . " - . , '
The location is exceedingly healthful, only one pupil having, died during the
38 years of its existence and there having been no other case of serious sickness.
24-lm. Address REV. J. N. STALLINGS, Principal, TAomasville, N. C.
0A RIDGE INSTITUTE
-:o-
A FIRST CLASS HISS SCHOOL,
With Special Business College Ospartments.
ADMITS BOTH SEXES.,
i 4 I
A FULL AND THOROUGH THREE
years Academic Course of Study in
Classics, Natural Science and Mathe
matics. One of the most flourishing and
successful Business Colleges . south of
Washington. , 200 students from various
States last year. Special classes, Fall
Term of 1886, in Elocution, Vocal Music,
and Pedagogics, under the instruction
of expert and experienced teachers
Depends for patronage on its thorough
methods, and refers to its students in all
departmente of business and other voca
tions. New Buildings, New Furniture, New
Literary Society Halls, Reading Room,
&c. Full corps of experienced teachers.
Location in every way desirable. Fall
term opens August 10th. For Catalogue,
&c, address
J. A. & M. H. HOLT, Principals,
Oak Ridge, N. C.
July 14. 23 lm. ,
F11A&I I
-:o:-
Five of the leading schools of the
world are represented by their graduates
in our corps of teachers the Stuttgart
Conservatory of Music of Germany, the
Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, the
University of Va., the Amherst School
of Languages, and the Cooper Union Art
School of New York.
In consequence of the continued in
crease of patronage, several thousand
dollars will be spent during the vacation
in enlarging the buildings.
Catalogues are now ready for distribu
tion. The session of 1886 and ?87 opens
September 1, and closes June 2.
22-6t, . F. P. HOBGOOD.
PEACE INSTITUTE,
EALEIGII, X. 0.
For YoangLaflie and Small Girls.
FALLSESSION COMMENCES FIRST
Wednesday in September and closes
corresponding time in June following.
An experienced and highly accomplish
ed corps of teachers in all branches usu
ally taught in first-class Seminaries for
young ladies and girls. Advantages for
instruction in Music, Art and Modern
Languages unsurpassed. Building heat
ed by steam and lighted by gas and elec
tricity. Expenses less than any Female
Seminary , offering same , ; advantages.
Special arrangements for small girls.
Deduction for two or more from same
family or neighborhood. Correspondence
solicited. For Catalogue address
, Rev. R. BUR WELL & SON, .
21-3m. Raleigh, N. C.
POMONA HILL
NURSERIES! !
:o:
THESE NURSERIES ARE LOCA
" ted 2 miles 'west '6F(Trn8bbrb7 at
the junction thRiclmi&id & Danville
and Salem Branch' "Railroads. There you
can find ' '
ONE AND A. HALF MILLION OF
TREES AND VINES GROWING.
Parties wanting Trees, &c, are respect
fully invited to call and examine stock
and learn the extent of these Nurseries.
Stock consists of all the leading and new
varieties of Apple, Peach, Pear; (Stand
ard and Dwarf), Plums, Apricots, Grapes,
Cherries, Mulberries, Nectarines, Figs,
Quinces, Gooseberries, Raspberries, Cur
rants, Pecans, English Walnuts, Japanese
Persimmon, Strawberries, Shrubs, Hoses,
Evergreens, ' Shade Trees, fcc and in
fact everything of the hardy class usually
kept in a first-class Nursery, -
SUITABLE FOR NORTH CAROLINA
' and the Southern Border States.
New Fruits, of special note are the
Yellow Transparent Apple, Lady Ingold
Peach, the Lawson, Iveiffer, Lucy Duke
and Beaufort Pears, Lutie, Niagara and
the Georgia Grape, Wofford's Winter. :
JKsgp- Descriptive Catalogues free.
Correspondence solicited. Special in
ducements to large planters.
Address, - J. VAN. LINDLEY,
Pomona, Guilford Co., N. C.
21-ly t , . : ;
IMINABY

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