OCR Interpretation


The progressive farmer. [volume] (Winston, N.C.) 1886-1904, September 22, 1886, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92073049/1886-09-22/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

THE
3
UAV 1 BEYOND.
One of us, dear , . ,
. But one-;-. . . . ; .
Will sit by a bed with a marvellous face,
And clasp a hand,
Growing ooldi as. it feels for the spirit
v.-. ,' - land - ;
Darling, which one?
One of us, dear .
But one : : 1 :
Will stand by the other's coffin bier,
And look and weep, 1 1 1
While those marble lips strange silence
' ' . keep
One of us, dear '
" But one-
By an open grave will drop a tear, "
And homeward go,
The anguish of an unshared grief to
know
. Darling, which one? r ',.
One of us, darling, it must be : . ;
It may be you will slip from me j , ; . ,
Or perhaps my life may just be done, .
Which one? '
Unidentified:
CONTROLLING THE SEX.
I always read with great interest
the letters of Mr. Stephen Beale,
but that which appeared in your
issue of January 28 was particularly
interesting to me from the fact that
in it he discussed the question of
determining the sex of eggs. This
subject, in connection with controll
ing the sex of animals has for some
time been receiving considerable
attention in England. When pre-
Earing the lecture which I recently
ad the honor of delivering at the
London Institute of Agriculture, I
received valuable assistance from
Mr. Henry Webb, of Streely Hall,
Cambridgeshire, whose reputation
as one of the most successful of our
English breeders t)f Southdowns is
equally well known in the States as
in this country. ,r
Mr . Webb has for many years bred
Pheasant Malay fowls at an off-farm,
and on enquiring last autumn of the
foreman as to the number of pullets
which could be spared for disposal,
he was informed by the man that
he had purposely been -rearing as
many cockerels as possible. Mr.
Webb expressed hisregret, and asked
how. this result had been brought
about. The man replied: "By set
ting the greater part of the eggs
which were ribbed or indented on
the small end." The man then
picked out two eggs, one of which
would produce a cockerel and the
other a pullet; these eggs were for
warded to me by post, and the dif
ference was most marked. I pro
pose testing the system during the
coming spring. I will then give
you the results. '
I have had this week two most
curious instances, confirming the
superiority "theory." The first was
afforded by a very favorite sow of
the Yorkshire breed, Holywell Queen
122, now nearly five years old, 'and
which has produced nine litters of
pigs, numbering altogether il30
youngsters. Last October she was
mated with a strong and vigorous
young boar, and : in ; due course far
rowed five immense pigs, four of
which were boars and one sow. The
next case was with another of my
best sows. Blemish II (94,) how 3
years old; she was also mated with
the same boar as Holywell Queen,
and farrowed, on Monday ; last,
twelve fine pigs, all of which were
boars. The last is a most remark
able instance, as during an extensive
experience in pig breeding,- extend
ing over a quarter of a century, I
have never before noticed the whole
litter of pigs of one sex. The near
est approach to this was' in the case
of Queen Bee, who, when an old sow,
produced to a young boar a litter of
sixteen pigs, fifteen of them were
males. Sanders Spencer, in Country
Gentleman. "
PROPER FEEDING FOR PORK.
Some people, says; the National
Live, Stock Journal, may fancy that
the subjectof proper, feeding .is "of
little' importance, and that any man
who can handle a measure, or shovel
can dole out feed to hogs just as
well as a man who has paid atten
tion to, the subject of feeding, but
such a conclusion would-be very
erroneus. jMany hog-raisejs are ig
norant of I jthe importance of right
feeding, and .-are too indolent to.
exert themselves enough to under
stand the subject' and bejabte to
select and combine foods in jthe
right proportions. They have i got
into the 5 habit of, feeding , corn to
hogs, and as this is.a highly carbon
aceous food, it produces a minimum
of lean; meat and, a maximum of
lard. ... So long, as., (theM; system of
almost exclusive . corn feeding con
tinues, the product will be light
hams and shoulders. Skimmed milk
and butter milk added to the corn
will help improve the feed. Wheat
bran, shorts, midlings, peas, barley
meal, etc., would make a still fur
ther improvement. ' Then, if the
hogs could have a good clover pas
ture to ' run in, or even clover cut
and fed them, it would be a further
addition. These8 are all classed
among the albuminous foods and
help balance the carbonaceous mate
rial of the corn. !,,M
BUTTER AND OTHER FATS.
The Rural New Yorker in a short
account of the meeting of the Ameri
can Society of Microscopists, held at
Chautauqua, Yj, gives matter in
relation to butter1 and other fats,
from which we glean the following:
Dr. Thomas Taylor, of the Depart
ment of Agriculture, read a very
valuable5 paper on butter fats' and
oleomargarine. Dr. Taylor had for
some years conducted a series of
experiments seeking to discover a
sure test for oleomargarine. He dis
covered that there was a distinct
difference between crystals of butter
and those of other'fats. This differ
ence is shown by a powerful micro
scope, and it was thought by many
that the surest and simplest test for
bogus butter had been found. Re
cently, Prof. Weber, another distin
guished scientist, has declared that
in samples of oleomargarine sent to
him for examination, he can find no
great difference between the physi
cal characteristics of the fat globules
of butter and its substitutes. This
called out a reply from Dr. Taylor,
in which he practically repeats his
statements and combats the theory
of Prof. Weber. He insists that the
butter crystal has several peculiar
characteristics which he has not yet
found in connection with any other
crystals of fat, animal, or vegetable.
Dr. Taylor's argument was elaborate
and strong. ;
WATERPROOFING GARMENTS.
Farmers have 1 as much need of
waterproof garments as the sailors
have, for a farmer cannot stay in
doors when it is raining and
must be more' or less exposed to
all sorts of weather. The rubber
coats now made are a delusion and
a snare, being made of cobwebby
cloth and the thinnest thin coating
of gumf A-now coat is leaking all
over, but especially on the shoul
ders, the most important part to
keep dry, in one hour's exposure to
a heavy rain. The writer, having
been disgusted with this thin excuse
for a water-proof garment provided
himself with an .overcoat and leggings
of stout duck cloth, and mixing one
quart of well-boiled linseed and halt
n ounce of beeswax, applied this
when warm to the said garments
and at a very small cost had water
proof clothing .which was really
water proof, and turns twenty-four
hours', rain as well as a goose's back
sheds : water. ? t The same , dressing
has been, : found excellent for hay
caps, as : wholly . impervious to the
rain N.,iY. Times. ,-. -;
SAVING SEED CORN.
A : common-sense Kansas farmer,
who, by the way has taken a num
ber Of first premiums at county and
State fairs, says his method is simple
and wort hy of notice. He com
menced ten years ago with an early
variety,5 and every year when he
cuts h is ; corns he leaves standing a
number of stalks with extra nice
ears. ; When this : has thoroughly
matured, ho husks and selects there
from the best for seed. And he
makes it a point to go through the
field arid mark: the hills that mature
early,' the main point being to have
the best seed of the earliest-maturing
corn. The ground is plowed deep
very early in the spring, and the
seed put in assoonas the frost is
well out.. of , the , ground. Sumner
: Fow . persons understand by
rainfall in Jncnes. what , this T really
.means, but j an .inch of rain means, a
gallon, lor ;.every,typ square, tee t, or
jlOO tons per acre., u n vvi
I XUO XXX O v VVCvVLI - x IX uvuviwtii u
I; ' 1M idhii'l.iJLii:Ll
orouffnii tnitner in 190.1. wueu uueii
jsiary came irora rrauve. , , 4 ....
THINGS WPRTH KNOWING.
The first-iron steamship .was
built in 1830.
The first' balloon ascent was
made in 1698. '
( r Coaches weie first. used in Eng
land in 1569; ,,- . -
i. i
The first horse-railroad was built
in 1826-'27.
''it
The first 'steamboat plied the
Hudson in 1807. ' ; ' ; V
. Gold was first discovered in
California in 1849.
The first- telescope was used in
England in' 1608. '
The first newspaper advertise
ment appeared in 1652. ( , :
Kerosene was first used for
lighting purp'oses in 1826. i;
Omnibuses were first introduced
in New York in 1830.
The Journal of Applied Chemistry
recommends the use of a small quan
tity of carbolic acid in paste for
laying paper-hangings and in white
wash, and states that it will repel
cockroaches and all other insects. It
will also neutralize the disagreeable
odor consequent upon the decompo
sition of the paste, which in newly
papered walls is very offensive. The
cheapest and best form of carbolic
acid is crystal, which dissolves in
water at an excess of temperature.
The crow, according to Mr. J.
T. Campbell, is one of the most
industrious and persistent seed-transporting
agencies known, and to its
efforts are probably due the founding
of many a new forest. This bird has
an aimless and mischievous habit of
picking up and flying away with
any small objects which happen to
attract attention, dropping them in
an equally aimless manner. The
crows often gather ; by hundreds,
holding noisy conventions, and as
they disperse each drop something,
the articles proving to be acorns,
walnuts, j hickory-nuts, buckeyes,
sycamoreballs,; sticks; egg-shells,
pebbles, etc. . I
IVY POISON.
Another antidote to the poison of
the poison ivy, etc. j- etc., which is
more commonly at hand than quick
lime, and more5 easily prepared
for application, is bicarbonate ' ot
sodaior common cooking soda. This
should be moistened with only water
enough to make a smooth paste and
then spread over the affected pan
and covered with a damp cloth. It
will give almost instant relief to the
burning sensation and will affect a
cure as soon as any other remedy.
, WANTED !
-:o:-
I WANT EVERY FARMER
ss who reads this paper to come
and examine my stock 01 .
HAENESS, COLLAES, BEIDLES,
SADDLES, WHIPS, HALTEES,
LAP EOBES, &c. ....
My goods are made of the best mate
rials and prices will be as low or lower
than goods of same quality can be had
of any other house. . ;
R. G. BURGESS, . .
Liberty Street, opposite Post Office,'
324m. Winston, N. C.
GUILFORD NURSERIES
RE LOCATED ON THE CAPE
XJL Fear & Yadkin Valley Railroad,
three miles south of Greensboro, N. C,
where can be found a fine assortment of
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Shrubs,
Vines, Plants) &c, consisting in part of
the following: t ;
Apple, Peach, Pear, Plum, Cherry,
Apricot, Nectarine, Quince, Fig, Mul
berry,. Japanese Persimmon, Straw beiry,
Raspberry, Gooseberry,' Currant, &c., &c.
Specialties. Apple, Peach, Plum arid
Cherry Trees. My stock of Peach con
sists of 300,000 trees of the best varieties
for market and home use j of Plum, Wild
Goose, Shropshire, Imperial Gage, Green
Gage, Washington, Peach Plum, Rich
land, Weaver, &c. ; of Cherries, all . the
leaders for market and home" consump
tion ; of Grapes, Concord; Ives, Champion,
Nortons, Martha, Delaware, Worden,
Niagara, and all the best Wine and Table
Grapes. : I have 150,000 1 vines ' ready for
fall planting of the above' varieties arid can
give special prices' to those who contem
plate planting vineyards. Of 'Strawber
Tises, all5 the best and most profitable
kinds. ,-,,: ,,;!,-.!"! j?uiTtu 'io' ,h;;ui
Send your orders early ; they will be
carefully filled, and no pains spared to
please the purchaser J r . ' " . ' ,
' Special prices given to large planters.
Correspondence solicited.1 4 ' 1 : ' i :"
Cataloffties mailed to abnlicants.' r 'Ji :
h!v; . L. ANTHONY; Prbp'r, uj
ShiDDintr point : Greensboro, N. C. . , 1 .
"on v: .-'".-'-"1 J ''.'
STANDARD I)K !
DO NOT FORGET TO CALL AT '
The Old Reliable Drug House
OF
km
for what you want.
He has all the
NEW and STANDARD DRUGS !
at bottom prices and will not be
undersold. ;
He has PAINTS for your house,
wagon and carriage. :
It will pay you to stop in, if only
to see that BEAUTIFUL $2,000
SODA FOUNTAIN.
JlPolite . clerks await you
with welcome.
: - 15-ly.
mm
THOROUGH BRED
AND TROTTING HORSES ;
JERSEY CATTLE ;
SOUTHDOWN SHEEP ;
BERKSHIRE HOGS:
AND BRONZE TURKEYS.
Young stock for sale by
S. B. ALEXANDER.
5-6ra. Charlotte, N. C.
ASHCRAFT & OWENS,
"Vyi n stoix, 2". C.
-DEALERS IN
Pure Drugs and Patent Medicines
I
READY-3IIXED FAINT,
WHITE ' , LEAD, OILS
AND VARNISHES, ;
MACHINE AND TANNERS OILS!
TRUSSES AND SHOULDER
, BRACES. .::
Orders by Mail Promptly Attended to.
20-Iy. !
' t
CEDAR GROVE
NU R SERIES.
VER ONE MILLION FRUIT
J Trees, Vines and Plants, suitable for
permanent5 orchard-planting or stock for
JNurserymen. 11. very aesiraoie variety
of Apple, Peach, ; Pear, Clierry, Aprico;.
Nectarine, Plum, Grapes, Strawberries.
&c, at the most reasonable rates'.' Call
or write before ordering "' elsewhere and
learn the extent of these Nurseries. ,
STOCK UNRIVALLED. Straight,
nice, thrifty. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Catalogue sent free. Address,
; ; N. W. CRAFT,
, s , Shore, Yadkin Co.,: N. C.
, ; 28 6m. . . , ;
FARMERS TAKE NOTICE !
-:o:-
When you visit Winston' with the
purpose of buying Groceries you will do
well to call at D. S. Ray's New Grocery
Store, .and examine his goods and get
his ; prices before buying.,. ; Satisfaction
guaranteed, as to prices and quality of
goods. My motto is: Quick Sales, Small
Profits and Fair Dealing with all. ; !
i nVery Truly, , : . D. S. RAY, M
Qne j door below , the office of The Pro
gressive Farmer, 4th street, ,
31-3m. Winston, JN. U.
i: '
.Mil i j ( f; ' -i
CHEAP,, PIAUOS MID, ORGANS.
ERSONS W XS TIN G 7 GOOD AND
y cheap;: second-hand instraments
snouia inot iaii j 10 examine irroi. v.s
Wilson's price-list., Pianos ; from $65 to
$300 Organs from! $45 to $150."Ludden
& Bates arejfihding reacly, sale jTor them.
Now is this time to secure a! bfg bargain
for little moneyr'Frcightpstool, cover and
music-extra, as ?iwith new, instruments,
j ,Oftice. s f finger I , jyianufacturing Com
pany, opposite P. p.,inston, N.,C.,'
' 14 -3m. '- l" " ' ' ' -
1 t 1 . . 1 1 ? T ' X
wmmi
it '1 m 1
7 "
OFEALEIGH,. C,
INSURES AtAlNOSS BY FIRE.
This Company has .been
in successful operation;
for Sixteen Years.
. . -
W. S. PRIMROSE, President.
W. G. UPCHURCH, YicePres.
. CHAS. ROOT, Sec. and Treas.
P. COWPER, Adjuster.
Feb. 10.
GRAY BLOCK,
WINSTON, N. C.
-:o:-
THE LARGEST RETAIL DRY
Goods, Millinery and Shoe House
in the State.
PIONEERS OF LOW PRICES !
And the guiding stars for square and
honest dealing. .
We show Styles that are Captivating,
Enchanting and Fascinating. .
Do not be bull-dozed by dealers who
shout big things and claim to show
what they cannot produce, but come
direct to Headquarters.
ggSole agents for the New High Arm
Vertical Feed Davis Sewing Machine.
All mail orders will .receive prompt
attention. Samples sent on application.
RYTTENBERGr BROS.
15-3m. ' ; : ('
CAROLINA CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY,
OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT, (
Wilmington, N. C, Sept. 27, 1885. 5
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
ON AND AFTER THIS DATE, THE FOL
lowing Schedule will be operated on thig
Railroad: ' 1 ;
PASSENGER.M AIL AND EXPRESS TRAIN:
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
(Leave Wilmington at....... 7.00 P. M.
No. l.-l Leave Raleigh at.... .75 P. M.
(Arrive at Charlotte at ....7.30 A. M.
(Leave Charlotte at ...'.....'.'.$.15 Pi M.
No.2.s Arrive at Raleigh at ..y.00 A. M.
(Arrive at Wilmington at...... ..8.25 A. M.
LOCAL FREIOHT-Passenger Car Attached.
Leave Charlotte at 7.40 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at....................5.4.5 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at 6.15 A. M.
Arrive at Charlotte at.......................4.40 P. M.
Leave Wilmington at .45 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at........ .....A00 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at .5.30 A. M.
Arrive at Wilmington at....:...........-5.40 P. M.
Local Freight between Wilmingtoa and Lau:
rinburg Tri-weekly leaving Wilmington on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Leave
Laurinburg on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sat
urdays. :.' ; ; : i ' ;i.
Passenger Trains stop at regular stations on
ly, and Points designated in the Company's
Time Table. .., ; '
SHELBY DIVISION, PASSENGER, MAIL,
EXPRESS AND FREIGHT.
Daily except Sundys , i ;
xr o Leave Charlotte at 8.15 A. M.
JNO3 1 Arrive atmelby at....:..i...J...12-15 ; P. M.
vr- . (Leave Shelby at ..... ...,,... 1.40 A. M.
iNO-4t Arrive at Charlotte at ; 5.40 P. M.
Trains No. 1 and 2 make close connection at
Hamlet with R. & A. Trains to and from
Raleigh: 1 '
Through SleepingCars between Wilmington
and Charlotte and Raleigh and Charlotte.
. Take Train No: I for Statesville, Stations on
Western N. C. R. R., Asheville and points
West.
Also, for Spartanburg, Greenville, Athens,
Atlanta and all points Southwest. . , . -
ti 'r , L. C. ONES Superintendent.
W. !f. ' CLARK, Gen'l Passenger Agent.
Caps Fear & Tadkin Tallej Railway Co.
Condensed Time Table No, 13,
TRAIN NORTH. .
NORTH
CAROLINA
w
Arrive. Leave.
. - ' ' i . -v I '.
Bennettsville., 8:20 a. nx.
Shoe Heel v:40 a. m. 9:50 a. m.
Fayetteville... .. 12:00 m. I2A5p. m.
Sanford 2:15 p. m. 2:25 p. m.
Ore Hill.i........ 3:43 p.m.
Liberty r 4:37 p. m.
GreeusDoro.. 6:00 p. m. ........... :....
' Dinner at Fayetteville. '
' TRAIN SOUTH.
Arrive. Leave.
Greensboro 9:50 a. m.
Liberty . 11x5 a.m.
Ore IH11....M..............M... ! ............m.. 12:00 m.
Sanford ......................... 1:2" p. m. 1:45 p. xn.
Fayetteville................. 3:50 p. in. 4.-00 p. m.
Shoe Heel.................... 6:05 p. ml 0:15 p. m.
Bennettsville 7:30 p. m.
'ttb 'mi-. .il)inrier at "Sanford. " 1 ; ,
.Freight and" Passenger T ain leaves Bn
nettJ5vllleTuesdayKt Thursdays and Saturdays
at 2:30 p. m., arriving at Shoe Heel at 4:30 p. m.,
and at Fayetteville at 8 p.m. ' '
r Leaves Fayetteville on Tuesdays Thurs
days and Saturdays at 6:30 a. xn.. Shoe Heel at
10 a. m. and arrives at Bennettsville at 12 xn.
Freight and Passenger Train North leave
Fayetteville dally -at 8a.irw (connecting at
Sanford with Freight and Passenger Trains to
Raleigh), leaving Sanford at 11:30 a. m.fand
arriving at Greensboro at 5:40 p. m.
8nford at 11:15 a. m. and arrivesi jat FayetU-
vllle at2:40p. m. "- r
-i ii'i Hi ' Hu if ,-v,v i f r JOHN ,Mr ROSE' o
. , . General Passenger Agent ,
'i W. M. R. DUNK, ;..,., .. r j
; :, Ge6uDrlntendent( tvliy l

xml | txt