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The progressive farmer. [volume] (Winston, N.C.) 1886-1904, November 24, 1886, Image 5

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THE PROGRESSIVE FARMER, NOVEMBER 24, 1886.
5
Mr. J. A.Gray is having a handsome
residence erected on Cherry street.
Suckers from the Catawba put in an
appearance occasionally in this market.
The Baptist Convention held last
week in Wilmington was the largest ever
held in the State.
George Detmar, a sprightly little
Salem boy, accidentally cut off the first
joint of three fingers in a cutting machine
one day last week.
The highest price of the season was
made for a Stokes county planter at
Piedmont Warehouse a few davs airo.
viz: $43.00 per hundred.
Much needed rain put in an appear
ance Sunday night, since when the
ground has been pretty well soaked. It
will do good and help wheat sown.
A farmer from Davidson county
came to Winston last week with a wagon
load of shoats, offered at from one to
two dollars each but found dull sale.
An accidental fire destroyed the saw
mill of Messrs. Spaugh & Light, between
Winston and Kernersville, Wednesday
last, with a considerable quantity of lum
ber. Mr. J. O. Foy has entered into part
nership with Mr. Snider in the manage
ment of the Twin-City Daily, which, by
the way, is growing better as it grows
older.
A baby show, for babies under 18
months of age, is one of the features of
the Riflemen's Fair. Prize : a handsome
baby carriage ; judges : four middle-aged,
not old, bachelors.
No coal for fires in graded school
yesterday and scholars got holiday. The
majority of them, judging from their
demonstrations on the street, would not
object to a frequent shortage of coal.
Much interest has been manifested
in the protracted meeting in progress at
the Methodist Protestant Church the
past week, where Mrs. Moon, of the
denomination of Friends, has preached
regularly.
Many of our tobacco manufacturers
are now running their factories until a
late hour at night that they may catch
up with their orders and be ready to
close operations before cold weather.
Some of them, we are told, will work the
weed almost during the entire winter.
Sentinel.
We yield considerable space this
week to the letter of Bill Arp, which
will be found instructive as well as entertaining,-
The friends of Col. Long, the
representative-elect from Cabarrus, say
Bill does him injustice in the reference
made to him. Perhaps some wag per
sonated Col. Long and thus perpetrated
a joke on the Georgia joker.
The U. S. Army numbers 2G,06G
men and officers.
Burglars are doing a thriving busi
ness in Charlotte.
The next Baptist State Convention
will meet in Durham. '
During the present year 1890 dis
tilleries were registered in North Caro
lina against 1590 the previous year.
Rev. J. C. Alexander, pastor of the
Presbvterian church at Buffalo, Guilford
county, died of paralysis on the 15th
inst.
.Joseph McDonald, Democrat, will
probably be elected U. S. Senator from
Indiana to succeed Ben Harrison, Re
publican. Mr. C. Sherrill severs his connection
with the Concord Times to go to Vander
bilt University where he will take a
course in theology.
T. M. Logan, James B. Pace and A.
S. .Sully have purchased a controlling
interest in the Richmond and Danville
Railroad Company.
The Baptist denomination in North
Carolina had in 1784, 42 churches with
3,776 members, now it has 2,305 churches
with 225,322 members.
There were terrific gales on sea and
on the lakes last Wednesday and Thurs
day causing a loss of over $700,000 to
shipping and forty lives.
President Cleveland declined the
honor of an L.L. D. tendered by Harvard
University. Perhaps his coachman
would not have declined.
A Chicago physician thinks that in
stead of hanging convicted murderers,
the best use that can be made of them is
to turn them over to the medical frater
nity to "experiment on the vital forces."
Mrs. Stewart left $10,000,000 to Judge
Hilton m trust to Jbe used 4s J tie' deems
best.
1
4
-r Tivb ' thousand fone hundred iarid
fifty acres of mineral lands in West
Virginia were sold last week to a Phila
delphia syndicate for $150,000.
- The Southern . Methodist Church is
how estimated to number a million of
white members, about double the mem
bership at the close of the war.
Davie county votes on the first
Tuesday in December on a ' proposed
$100,000 subscription to the South
Atlantic and North Western Railroad.
It is said that the railroad companies
in the West have not freight cars enough
to carry the freight, and that new ones
are being turned out as rapidly as possi
ble. The question whether tobacco will
kill has ben affirmatively settled by an
Arkansas man who whittled a bullet
out of a plug of tobacco and shot a wild
cat with it.
M. E. Benton, the U. S. Solicitor in
Missouri, who was suspended from office
by the President for speech-making in
the recent political campaign, has been
reinstated.
A report comes from London that
the alliance between England and Aus
tria which has been talked about for
some time has been effected. This will
be news to Russia.
Heavy snow storms throughout the
North and West last week, the snow
falling to the depth of eighteen inches
in some places, seriously interfering with
railroad travel.
A SPECIAL OFFER.
Remember that the Progressive
Farmer and the Patch Corn Sheller
(price $3)is offered to you for four dollars
only. The President of Sandy Ridge
Club has this to say of the Sheller,
Winston, N. C, June 19, 1886.
Col. Jj. Ij. Polk: At your request I
took the Patch Corn Sheller and Sepa
rator and tested it. I am so wTell satis
fied with it that I want to keep it and
pay you for it. It is decidedly the best
corn sheller for the price that I have
ever seen, and in my judgment it should
have a large salef among our farmers.
Respectfully,
J. H. Reich.
Winston tobacco 3Uarhrt.
Breaks larger than at any time since
beginning of new tobacco year. All
tobaccos with color selling well. Note
special demand for fine lugs and cutters
at good prices. Green and frosted tobac
cos low.
CORRECTED WEEKLY AT THE WAREHOUSES.
Lugs Common, sound, $1.50 to $ 2.50
" Medium, 3.50 to 5.50
" Good, 7.00 to 10.00
" Fine, 12.00 to 15.00
Leaf Common, $ 2.00 to $ 3.50
" Medium, 4.50 to 7.00
" Good,....i 9.00 to 12.00
Cutters. Good, $16.00 to $20.00
" Fine, 22.50 to 30.00
Wrappers Common,.... $17.00 to $20.00
" Medium; 25.00 to 30.00
" Good, 25.00 to 35.00
" Fine, none offered.
The prices of many of the articles enu
merated below are materially affected by
the "law of supply and demand," but
this table is corrected weekly by some of
our largest and most reliable dealers, and
our readers may accept the quotations as
approximately correct :
Wheat, white, per bushel......... $1.00 to 1.25
44 red, " " ' 8 ) to 1.10
Corn, per bushel. 6f)to 65
Corn Meal, per hundred, 1.40 to 1.50
Oats, per bushel, 50 to 6
Beans, per bushel, colored 80 to 1.00
white, 1.00 to 1.50
Peas, 44 75 to 1.00
FIhx Seed, per hundred, 1.25 to 1.40
Flour, 44 44 2 .25 to 3 75
Hay, 44 44 75 to 1.00
Butter, fresh, per lb., 15 to 22
in ferkins, per lb., 10 to 15
Beeswax, per lb., 20 to 25
Tallow, 44 44 6 to 7
Country Meat, hog round, per lb., 8 to 10
44 Hams, per lb 12 to 15
44 Shoulders, per lb.,... 8 to 10
Chickens, 18 to 2
Spring,.... .. ..... 12 to 15
Eggs, per doz., 1) to 12
Honey, strained, per gallon, tO to 1.00
in comb, per lb...... 8 to 10
Irish Potatoes, new crop, per bush J 5 to 45
Potatoes, sweet . 40to5J
DRIED FRUIT.
Dried fruits of all kinds are coming
in and the folfowing prices are fully
established as quoted by Hinshaw &
Bynum:
Blackberries, 0 to 7 cts.
Cherries,.., .. 6 to 8 "
Quarter large cut apples,.. 1 to 1 "
Bright sliced apples.. 1 to U "
Fancy sliced apples, 0 to 2 "
Extra Fancy sliced apples, 2 J to 3 "
Half peaches, 2 to 2 J "
Quarter peaches...... 1J to 2 "
T) -.Li 1 1 1 A it
r aiiuy petsieu. peavutrs, v w
-Ei. X? 1 A A f 4-n ft I
FARMERS' CLUB.
Form of Constitution and 7 By-Laws.
i '" '. t i i f ; ' -
- ;' Constitution.
This club shall be known as the
Farmers' Club of Town
ship. Its object shall be to improve
the condition of the farmers and
promote the cause of Agriculture.
Its officers shall consist of a Pres
ident, Vice-president and Secretary
and Treasurer, who shall be elected
for the term of one year.
It shall be the duty of the Pres
ident to preside at all regular or
called meetings of the Club, and to
announce the order of business. In
his absence the Yice-President shall
preside. In the absence of both,
the Club may elect a temporary
Chairman.
It shall be the duty of the Secre
tary to keep a record of the pro
proceedings of the club, and cany
on such correspondence as the Club
may direct.
In addition to the officers there
shall be an Executive Committee
consisting of three or more members,
as the Club may determine, to
transact business appertaining to
the Club.
Applications for membership
must be made by petition, endorsed
by one or more members of the
Club. Such petition shall be referred
to a committee, who will report at
the next regular meeting, when a
vote may be had upon the petition,
a majority of the Club, not of those
present simply, being necessary to
elect to membership.
No one shall be eligible to mem
bership unless practically engaged
in Agriculture. Farmers' wives
and daughters may be elected as
honorary members.
There shall be no initiation or
other fee charged. All necessary
expenses shall be defrayed by pro
portionate assessment or by vol
untary contributions, as the Club
may decide.
The President, Vice-president and
Secretary shall be ex-officio represen
tative members of the Club to the
County Club, when such is organized,
and shall have full power to vote and
act for the Club, unless the Club
shall decide to elect other members
as such representatives.
The Club shall have power to
draft by-laws for its government.
The constitution may be amended
by giving two months' notice of the
amendment proposed in writing, but
no amendment shall be carried
without a two-thirds vote of the
members of the Club.
By-Laws.
I. The meetings of the Club shall
be held once a month (or oftener) at
such time and place as the Club
may direct. Special meetings may
be called by the Executive Commit
tee if deemed advisable.
II. The order of business shall be :
1. Calling the roll.
2. Beading minutes of preceding
meeting.
3. Election of new members.
4. Report of committees.
5. Unfinished business.
6. New business.
7. Election of officers.
III. Elections shall be by ballot,
the tellers appointed by the Pres
ident, and those candidates receiv
ing the largest number of votes,
as counted before the Club, shall be
declared elected.
IV. After the regular business,
the club may hear discussions,
essays or addresses upon Agricul
ture, but no religious or political
discussions will be permitted, or
nothing calculated to mar the har
mony of the Club.
V. Seven members sh all; consti
tute a quorum for the transaction of
business. " . , .
Each member will have the right
to express his fully J upon any
subject under discussion, but must
do so courteously and riot indulge in
rudeness. Breach of courtesy will
subject the offender to reproof, and if
persisted in, he may be expelled by a
vote of the Club. An expelled mem
ber cannot regain admission under
one year.
Every member should feel it his
duty to advance the interests of his
fellow members, and of his brother
farmers, giving such aid and council
as they may seek, when in his
power to do so.
jggT'The above form, with slight
modifications, will answer for the
organization of County Clubs.
WHICH HAS KNOCKED THE BOTTOM OUT
AT 11 OMCIML CHEAP MS.
:o:
WE HAVE IT AND YOU
WHATEVER YOU WANT CALL FOR IT.
will be astonished at our prices.
HARDWARE, HANDKERCHIEFS,
BOOTS, UMBRELLAS, BLANKETS,
Clocks, Clothing, Buttons, Shawls, Trunks,
And the most complete variety of all sorts of goods ever offered in Winston.
J5rDon't make a mistake. Our house is between the Post Office and the
Drug Store. You will find us wide awake and always ready to wait on you, and
we simply defy competition in prices. It will cost you nothing to call and see our
goods and get our prices. Try us, it will do you good.
N. B. Remnants of All-Wool Cloth for Men and Boys' Clothing at 33 J cents a
yard.
41 -3m.
ORIGINAL CHEAP JOHN.
T. H. PEG-RAM, Jr.,
bENEBAL
BROKER,
Now occupies his new and commodious building next door to Hinshaw &
Bynum, on 4th street. Has always in stock
THREE POPULAR BRANDS OF GUANO !
A FINE ASSORTMENT OF
BUGGIES AND CARRIAGES!
; AND THE CELEBRATED
PIEDMONT WACOW!
ISTThe Best in the State at the Price
41-3m.
CARPET fCARPET !
:r.
HEMP CARPET.
INGRAIN CARPET!
BRUSSELS CARPET !
CHEAP CARPET!
GOOD OARPET!
S MATTING !
AT THE
NORTH m
ML
R. STEVENS.
LOO K AND LISTEN!
DA
Wa,T. wliiii mmQ
ARE DAILY RECEIVING THEIR
iLL MB W1ITIE f QBE
W
At such low prices as will astonish the natives.' 1 i ;
57 3ttY;.GC0t
Dress Goods, Calicoes, Kerseys, Cassimeres, Jeans, Flannels, Domestics, &c;, &c.
NOTIONS! NOTIONS!
This Department is full and complete. ; i:
BOOTS MB SHOES !
All Styles arid Prices in Mens'i Ladies, BbysT, Ml-ss'.and Childrens? to suit the f
wants of all. ' 1 . . ' - -J .'
the Latest Styles and Lowest Prices.
Bacon, Lard, Flour, Sugar, Coffee; Tea, Oils, Molasses, &c, at lowest market prices.
We also sell British Mixture, G. Ober & Sons, and Owl Brand, for Tobacco and I
Wheat. ' :, .pttt -':t-
When you come to the city call at W. T. CARTER & Co. r j
Corner Main and Fourth Streets', ;
33-3m. Winston, N. C. ;
o r fc rr n rt

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