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The progressive farmer. [volume] (Winston, N.C.) 1886-1904, December 08, 1886, Image 3

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THE PROGRESSIVE FARMER, DECEMBER 8, 1886.
3
NOBODY KNOWS BUT MOTHER.
Nobody knows of the work it makes
To keep the home together;
Xobody knows of the steps it takes,
Nobody knows but mother.
Nobody listens to childish woes,
Which kisses only smother;
Nobody's pained by naughty blows,
Nobody only mother.
Nobody knows of the sleepless care
Bestowed on baby brother;
Nobody knows of the tender pray'r
Nobody only mother.
Nobody knows of the lessons taught
Of loving one another ;
Nobody . knows of the patience sought,
Nobody only mother.
Nobody knows of the anxious fears,
Less darlings may not weather
The storms of life in after years'
Nobody knows but mother.
Nobody kneels at the throne above
To thank the Heavenly Father,
For the sweetest gift a mother's love,
Nobody knows but mother.
. C, Dodge, in Detroit Free Press.
GUERNSEYS AS DAIRY COWS.
The following letter from the ven
erable L. F. Allen, of Buffalo, to the
editor of the London (Eng.) Live
Stock Record, in relation to Guern
sey cows will be found in line with
what we have held on the subject,
wherein he says:
Within the last five years I have
adopted the grade of cows of that
breed, by the use of thoroughbred
Guernsey bulls, to my herd of high
grade Short-horn cows, thus produc
ing a better class for butter-making,
the Short-horns not being always up
to the required standard for that
object. Not that the Short-horns in
their original condition were not
satisfactory dairy cows for many
yearn after their importation into
our country, but running so much
and early to flesh, and cultivated
more for the latter purposes, the
milking quali typhus, .been neglected
and the almost , exclusively milking
breeds lately introduced here, as the
Ayrshire, Jersey and Holstein. par
tially taking their places with dairy
men and private families. Thus far
my short experience favors the
Guernsey over either of the others
of perhaps a like origin with the
Jerseys in centuries back. I prefer
them to Jerseys for their great size
and hardihood, robust forms, carry
ing more flesh and equal quality and
quantity of milk according to size
Not that I at all undervalue the Jer
seys in the opinions of those who
prefer them, but their diminutive
size and leanness of flesh do not suit
my fancy. The full square udders,
good size of their teats, easiness of
milking and lymphatic temperament
of my half and three-quarter bred
Guernsey cows quite equal my ex
pectations. I intend, as time pro
gresses, with a continuous use of
thoroughbred bulls, to breed the
grades still higher, it having been
fully proved with those who have
long used both Guernseys and Jer
seys that well graded cows of those
bloods give as rich milk and high
quality of butter as thoroughbreds,
at much less cost of purchase than
they. Ayrshires are valuable for
cheese-making; so are the Holsteins
but the lessened quality of milk of
the latter, compared with, the larger
superior quality, give meager
weights of butter. Yet for supply
of milk for city, village or ordinary
family use, they may prove superior
to some others. I do not wish to
depreciate-them. Wo see occasional
accounts of enormous American
weights of butter in a seven days'
trial of both Jersey and Holstein
cows, the example being one cow
selected from a hundred or more, at
an extra expense of food, oftentimes
detrimental and sometimes fatal to
to the animal; but the tales reserve
the average yields from which they
are selected," which, if fully stated,
would give us a much truer value
of them. Some people's geese are
always swans.".- So it may be with
the owners of these extraordinary
cows. It may be that the regular
quantity of butter given by these
twenty-five to. forty pound cows in
a single .week's trial might :not on
the same rations of continuous food
of other cows, yield over seven or
eight pounds per; week during .-her
milking season of eight, nine or ten
months. Yet I do not combat with
these trials,-leavinftH the compet
itors to sum up their yearly products
to their; own! J satisfaction. Faring
Field and Stockman: i' -v ,:-M-
THINGS WORTH KNOWING.
In 1772 was passed the royal
marriage act in England, by which
the descendants of George II. are
incapacitated from marrying under
the age of twenty-five without the
consent of the sovereign.
A gentleman in Davenport, la.,
whose garden is near an electric
light tower, says his day lilies,
which ordinarily bloom only in the
daytime, open in the night, and that
the morning glories will unclose in
the night in a few minutes after the
tower lights brighten the garden
beds.
The number of hogs killed in
Chicago, from March 1 to November
1 aggregate 5,641,000 against 4,904,
000 last year. The packing for the
twelve months ending November 1
on the basis of all Western returns
now given, has aggregated 11,940,
000 hogs, compared with 11,425,000
the preceding year.
The problem of aerial naviga
tion is to be attacked by means of a
balloon of colossal size, which is
said to be nearly completed in Ber
lin. It is said to be 500 feet in
length, fifty feet in diameter, and to
weigh 43,000 pound. Two steam
engines of 50-horse power each are
to furnish propelling power.
Although the slave trade had
been put down wherever British
power reached, previous to William
IV. negro slavery stiil existed in
English colonies. In August 1833,
Great Britain issued a measure, the
act for the abolition of slavery, at
the cost of twenty millions sterling
in compensation to the slave own
ers. Many wheel makers are opposed
to wetting hubs before driving the
spokes, but this is altogether subject
to the condition of the hubs; if they
are not quite seasoned we think it
unnecessaiy to dip them in hot
water, but when over-dry, as is the
case in some 'factories where hubs
are kept two years before using, it
becomes necessary to dip tbem in
hot water before drivi ng the spokes.
A simple and effective method
of bleaching bones, so as to give
them the appearance of ivory, has
been introduced. After digesting
the bones with ether or benzine to
recover the fat, they are thoroughly
dried and immersed in a solution of
phosphoric acid in water containing
one per cent, of phosphoric anhy
dride. In a few hours after thjr-e
operations they are removed fro n
the solution with the result as stated.
VEGETABLES BETTER THAN
DRUGS.
Spinach has a direct effect upon
complaints of the kidneys.
The common dandelion, used as
greens is excellent for the same
trouble.
Asparagus purges the blood.
Celery acts admirably upon the ner
vous system and is a cure for rheu
matism and neuralgia.
Tomatoes act upon the liver.
Beets and turnips are excellent
appetizers; '
Lettuce and cucumbers are cool
ing in their effects upon the system.
Bed onions are an excellent diu
retic and the white ones are recom
mended eaten raw as a remedy for
insomnia. They are a tonic and
nutritious.
A! soup made from onions is re
garded by the French as an excellent
restorative in debility of the diges
tive organs. Western New Yorker.
WHY COLORS CAN NEVER BE
PHOTOGRAPHED,
It is now universally admitted by
chemists and physicians that natu
ral colors can never be reproduced by
the process of photography. There
is a broad philosophical reason for
the belief. Color has; no objective
existence It is simply the brain's
interpretation of the rapidity with
which the waves of the ray of light
beat atrainst the retina. " Beats more
"rapid produce the: sensation of the
mind known as violet; Deats less
rapid, that known as red. The vio
let and the red are nothing but the
vibrations of the ether until they
reach the optic nerve and: commu
nicate to that the vibrations which
the brain translates. Until collodion
or some-other sensitive I agent- can
be made . to vibrate like the optic
nervep and can be endowed with
intelligence like the brain, the undulations-
that' i fall upon it in a ray of
light' willi;emain : undulationkj and
noth inimore: id In other words,;it is
as impossible to photograph" color
aa it. ih tnnhrttftoTftnh ROUndiln -:-.!;-
- - x o r
A French physician announces
that distressing or excessive palpi
tation of the heart can always be
arrested by bending double, the
head down and the hands hanging,
so' as to produce a temporary con
gestion of the upper portion of the
body. In nearly every instance of
nervous or anaemic palpitation, the
heart immediately resumes its natu
ral function. If the movements of
respiration are arrested during this
action the effect is still more rapid.
OS!
I INVITE THE ATTENTION OF
the public to my selection of
Holiday Goods !
which are elegant in style and artistic in
design, consisting-of
PLUSH & CELLULOID GOODS!
WORK BOXES
-AND-
pHRISTMAS j3 ARDS !
Perfumery Cases !
EXTRACTS, &c.
-ALSO-
jHviag fan azii nolirt' nU
For gentlemen. In fact a full line of
beautiful presents for all.
Examine my Stock before purchasing.
V. O. THOMPSON, '
Winston, N. C.
The Twin-City Music House!
LIBERTY STKEKT,
WINSTON, N. C,
WILL, PROMPTLY FILL ALL ORDERS
for the Chicken ng, Mathushek, Mason and
Hamlin, Arion and Rent Pianos; the Mason
and Hamlin, Packard, and Bay State Organs,
from the Ludden & Bates1 Southern Music
H nse and has in stock all kinds of small
Musical Instruments, Musical Merchandise,
etc. Will also keep the Latest Sheet Music
and Music Books. Tuning and repairing thor
oughly done. Old instruments taken in ex
change for new ones.
Prof. C. L. WILSON,
.7. II. HARRELL,
Proprietors.
"biblical recorder.-
(established 1835.)
Rev. C. T. BAILEY, Editor.
Rev. C. S. FARRISS, Associate Editor.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
One copy one year, including postage..; $2 00
One copy six months, do . do 1 00
ed Wards, broughton & Co.,
Raieigh, N. C.
EDWARDS, BROUtfHTQN fe CO.,
RALEIGH, N. C,
PRINTERS, BINDERS
1 ; and 1 ; ; I -
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS.
3-AU the Legal Blank Forms in Stock.-S$i
. STANTON & MERItlTT,
MILLINERY & FAHCY GOODS,
-:o:-
WE ARE NOW RECEIVING OUR
Fall Stock, which embraces every
thing in our line. Selected and priced
with a view of securing trade, by pleading
our customers. Call and see us.
37 3m. J
Splendid Yadkin River Farm !
- :o: ;
SOO ACEES !
One-third of the tract bottom land.
One-half in cultivation.
Elegrant Grass, Grain and ' Stock
. ; - - Farm. - ' '
Heavily timbered and fertile soils. Terms
easy. . ' ' 1
For particulars apply to Editor of
i.s. The Progressive Farmer,
36-3m. "..Winston, N. C.
FARMERS TAKE NOTICE!
-:o:-
: When you . visit Winston with the
purpose of buying Groceries you will do
well to call at D. S. Ray's New Grocery
Store; and examine his goods and pet
his prices' before ' buying; ! Satisfaction
guaranteed as to prices and quality ; of
soods.. My motto is: Quick Sales, Small
Profits and Fair Dealing with all. -
Very Truly m JD. S. RAY,
One door below 1Ee office of The Pro
gressive Farmer,' 4th street,' 1 ' " '
' 313m. i; Winston, N C.
BY T filBll BIO!
Imii'fiteiil
GRAY BLOCK.
WINSTON, N. C.
:o:
NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT TO SECURE
UNPARALLELED BARGAINS.
The people are overwhelmed at the
vast arrav of inducements we offer," and
our willingness to give full value for
every dollar spent with us, secures the
favor and confidence of our patrons, and
fixes beyond all question our claim to
the distinction of
LEADERS IN OUR LINE !
Strongly protesting against the common
practice of trickery and deception, the
low prices we name for first-class articles,
strike with terror all competition.
We know the wants of all classes. We
supply them in the most satisfactory
manner.
We are the recognized authority on
Fashion, and
OUR IMMENSE STOCK THIS
SEASON, EMBRACING EV
ER Y THING NE W AND
ELEGANT,
maintains our reputation. We ask you
to look, at the complete line of
Fashionable Fabrics !
that are burdening our shelves and
counters compare our prices with any
house in the city, and we do not fear the
result. We show all of the
LATEST STYLE WRAPS!
at marvelously low figures. Full line of
JOTIONS ILLINERy!
And with a first-class Milliner and Dress
Maker in the house, we flatter ourselves
that we are able to meet the wants of all.
Make your headquarters at
THE TRADE PALACE !
When you visit Winston; and save
money on all your purchases.
Very respectfully,
RYTTENBERG BROS.
POMONA HILL
NURSERIES ! !
j
POgOlA,
-:o:
rpiIESE NURSERIES ARE LOCA
L ted 2 J miles west of Greensboro, at
the junction of the Richmond & Danville
and Salem Branch Railroads. There you
can find
ONE AND A HALF MILLION OF
TREES AND VINES GROWING.
Parties wanting Trees, &c, are respect
fully invited to call and examine stock
and learn the extent of these Nurseries.
Stock consists of all the leading and new
varieties of Apple, Peach, Pear; (Stand
ard and Dwarf), Plums, Apricots, Grapes,
Cherries, Mulberries, Nectarines, Figs,
Quinces, Gooseberries, Raspberries, Cur
rants, Pecans, English Walnuts, Japanese
Persimmon) Strawberries, Shrubs, R6ses,
Evergreens, Shade Trees, &c. and in
fact everything of the hardy class usually
kept in a first-class Nursery,
SUITABLE FOR NORTH CAROLINA
and the Southern Border States.
New Fruits of special note are the
Yellow Transparent Apple, Lady Ingold
Peach, the Lawson, Keiffer, Lucy Duke
and Beaufort Pears, Xutie, Niagara, and
the Georgia Grape, Wofford's Winter.
Descriptive Catalogues free.
Correspondence solicited. Special.in
ducements to large planters.
Address, J. VAN. LINDLEY,
Pomona, Guilford Co., N. C.
21 ly
!'- J
OF RALEIGH, N. C,
jonniw ww at
0
This Company has been
in ! successful operation .
1 for Sixteen Years.
W. S. PRIMROSE, President.
W.G. UPCHURCH.VicePres,
: 4 CHAS. ROOT, Sec. and Treas.
lh P. COWPERy Adjuster, i
NORTH
CAROLINA
T
LOSS
f FIRE
WANTED !
-:o:-
I WANT EVERY FARMER
who reads this paper to come
and examine my stock ot
HARNESS, COLLARS, BRIDLES,
SADDLES, WHIPS, HALTERS,
LAP EOBES, &c.
My goods are made of the best mate
rials and prices will be as low or lower
than goods of same quality can be had
of any other house.
R. G. BURGESS,
Liberty Street, opposite Post OtHce,
32-4m. Wixstox. N. C.
GUILFORD NURSBR1KS
ARE LOCATED ON THE CAPE
Fear & Yadkin Valley Railroad,
three miles south of Greensboro, N. C,
where can be found a fine assortment of
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Shrubs,
Vines, Plants, &c, consisting in part of
the following:
Apple, Peach, Pear, Plum, Cherry,
Apricot, Nectarine. Quince, Fig, Mul
berry, Japanese Persimmon, Strawbeiry,
Raspberry, Gooseberry, Currant, &v., &c.
Specialties. Apple, Peach, Plum j.nd
Cherry Trees. My stock of Peach con
sists of 300,000 trees of the best varieties
for market and home use; of Plum, Wild
Goose, Shropshire, Imperial Gage, Green
Gage, Washington, Peach'Plum, Rich
land, Weaver, &c. ; of Cherries, all. the
leaders for market and home consump
tion ; of Grapes, Concord, Ives, Champion,
Nortons, Martha, Delaware, Worden,
Niagara, and all the best Wine and Table
Grapes. I have 150,000 vines ready for
fall planting of the above varieties and can
give special prices to those who contem
plate planting vineyards. Of Strawber
rises, all the best and most profitable
kinds.
Send your orders ex rly ; they will be
carefully filled, and no pains spared to
please the purchaser.
Special prices given to large planters.
Correspondence solicited.
Catalogues mailed to applicants.
G. L. ANTHONY, Prop'r,
Vandalia P. O., N. C.
Shipping point: Greensboro, N. C.
30 3m.
CAROLINA CENTRAL KAILROAD COMPANY,
OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT, t
Wilmington, N. O.,ept. 27, 1885. J
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
ON AND AFTER THIS DATE, THE FOL
lowing Schedule will be operated on this
Railroad :
PASSENGER.MAIL AND EXPRESS TRAIN:
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAYS.
(Leave Wilmington at 7.00 P. M.
No.l.- Leave Raleigh at 7.3o P. M.
(.Arrive at Charlotte at 7.30 A. M.
( Leave Charlotte at 8.15 P. M.
No.2X Arrive at Raleigh at 9.00 A. M.
(Arrive at Wilmington at 8.25 A. M.
LOCAL FREIGHT Passenger Car Attached.
Leave Charlotte at 7.40 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at... ....1.......5.45 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at ($.15 A. M.
Arrive at Charlotte at 4.40 P. M.
Leave Wilmington at 6.45 A. M.
Arrive at Laurinburg at .5.00 P. M.
Leave Laurinburg at 5.30 A. M.
Arrive at Wilmington at 5.40 P. M.
Local Freight between Wilmington and Lau:
rinburg Tri-weekly leaving Wilmington on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Leave
Laurinburg on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sat
urdays. . j
Passenger Trains stop at regular stations on
ly, and Points designated In the Company's
Time Table.
SHELBY DIVISION, PASSENGER, MAIL,
EXPRESS AND FREIGHT. '
Daily except Sundays.
r-. o Leave Charlotte at 8.15 A. M.
wo Arrive at Shelby at..... 1215 P. M.
xr a f Leave Shelby at ,1.40 A.M.
0- Arrive at Charlotte at 5.40 P. M.
Trains No. 1 and 2 make close connection at
Hamlet with R. & A. Trains to and from
Raleigh. , . :
Through SleepingCars between Wilmington
and Charlotte and Raleigh and Charlotte.
Take Train No. 1 for Statesvllle, Stations on
Western N. C. R. R., Asheville and points
West.
Also, for Spartanburg, Greenville, Athens,
Atlanta and all points Southwest.
L. C. JONES, Superintendent.
W. F. CLARK, Gen'l Passenger Agent. ;
Cape Fear i Yadkin Valley Railway Co.
Condensed Time Table No, 13.
TRAIN NORTH.
I
Arrive. Leave.
E&Hiictft.-svillG & xxkm
shoe Heel n:4a. in. 9:50 a. m.
Fayetteville.... . 12:00 m. 1245 p. m.
Sanford :l p. m. 2:25 p.m.
Ore Hill 3: 13 p. m .
Liberty 4i7 p fu -
Greensboro.. rt-00 p. m ........
Dinner at Fayetteville.
1RAL SOUTH.
Arrive. Leave.
Greensboro 9:5 a. m.
jl be rty 11)5 & tti
Or IX 11 liiMMf X2i0 in
Sanford 1.-20 p. m. 1:45 p. m.
Fayetteville 3:50 p. m. 400 p. m.
Shoe Heel.............. 6-5 p. va. 6:15 p. m.
Bennettsvllle 7:30 p.m.
Dinner at Sanford. . .
Freight and Passenger Tiain leaves Bn
nettsville Tuesdays, Thursdays and Haturdays
at 2:30 p. m. arriving at Shoe Heel at 4:30 p. m.,
and at Fayetteville at 8 p.m.
Leaves Fayetteville on Tnesdays, Thurs
days and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m.. Shoe Heel at
10 a.m., and arrives at Bennettsvtlle at 12m.
Freight and Passenger Train North leaves
Fayetteville da'ly at 8 a. m.. (connecting at
Sanford with Freight and Passenger Trains to
Raleigh), leaving Sanford at 11:30 a. m., and
arriving at Greensboro at 5:40 p. m.
Leaves Greensboro dally at 5 a. m.; leaves
Snford at ll:L5a. m. and arrives at Fayette
ville at 2:tt) p.m. : ; v ;
. JOHN ROSE,.
j -' ' - ' General Passenger Agent
iW.M..DUNN. . .,',-,,. j-'-.m
Gen. Superintendent , . ,
i ill i-
CP

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