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The Skyland post. [volume] (West Jefferson, N.C.) 193?-1988, July 02, 1936, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92073203/1936-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
War Looms in Holy
Lands of Palestine
Bedouins March Over the River
Jordan to Oust Jews
and* English
Fierce desert warfare threatened
this week as 100,000 Bedouins urged
a march across the River Jordan to
the aid of their blodd brothers, the
Arabs of Palestine. ,
A meeting of desert sheiks result
ed in a decision to tell their ruler,
the Emir Abdullah of Transjordan,
British mandated kingdom, they are
ready to join Arabs of Palestine in
their guerilla warfare against the
Jews and the British.
The Emir and his own family are
divided in the face of the greatest
crisis since this desert nation itfas
carved out after the World war.
Thusf ar the Emir , has confined
himself to the role of offering advice
favoring peace.
Sipping coffee while sitting with
The Associated Press correspondent
in a tiny office of his palace, the
worn leader declared:
“I have offered my advice only. I
have not tried and do not want to
attempt more.”
Abdullah is a staunch friend of
Great Britain. As Emir he receives a
salary of 14,000 pounds (about
$70,000) annually.
Father, Son Clash
The mild, soft-spoken ruler of
300,000 persons, a majority of whom
are Bedouins, desert herders, and
fighters, in seeking to hold the coun
try on the side of peace was rumored
to have clashed with his son and
heir, Crown Prince Talal.
Talal, who was educated at Ox
ford, espouses the Arab cause as vig
orously and as openly as his father
advises caution and respect to Brit
ish policy across the River Jordan.
103,000 Apple Trees
Estimated in Ashe
In support of the movement to
secure a test fruit farm in experi
ment station in Wilkes county D. S.
Broyhill and B. C. Price, prominent
orchardists, and A. G. Hendren,
Wilkes farm agent, have gathered
some interesting information regard
ing the present status and prospects
of the fruit growing industry in
Wilkes.
In the fruit area in Wilkes and
Alexander counties there are 13,100
acres on which are growing bearing
apple trees numbering around 500,-
000 and non-bearing apple trees,
(young trees) 125,000.
This land based on an average of
$2.00 per tree would then be worth
$1,250,000.
- Adjoining Counties
In the adjoining counties the fol
lowing estimates have been made as
to the number of producing apple
trees:
Alleghany county, 60,400; Ashe,
103,600; Caldwell, 73,800; Watauga,
146,500 Yadkin, 51,000—total 435,300.
Scotland sells a white chocolate
that tastes like the black, but it is
milder.
Indians are said to immunize
themselves against poison-ivy by
eating three of the leaves during
the spring.
OUR PUZZLE CORNER
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ANIMUS r
In TAe WEEKS news!
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NEW—Art, pictorial as I j 9 |||
well as automotive, I KIF
brightens New York Ha
streets. This rural Rl
scene, hand-painted In JgL
oil, gives a surprising EasaL : ..IMF .1:1
touch to the last wordRED AND WHITE HAT—
In trucks. Autocar offi-1 White stitched linen forms
cials foresee an increase I the flattering hat worn by
of this style. IB Anita Colby. It has a shah
low crown and narrow
---- - L. M turned-up brim. A cluster of
HhßwW red flowers is p |aced on the
W crown just above the right
" w KSIMKy - eye> and ° ver jt at| •« a wid&>
; meshed veil.
aeaS . ■HRHMI. ’ : 3 rp ;
W j$L-' MILESTONE —Goodyear officials celebrate •=*
the production of a quarter billion tires.
R * ®* Wl,aon ' vice-president and sales man- ,i
M- ’ffiW.lllt afler and president Pau l W. Litchfield
are seen examining the actual two hundred
anc l fifty millionth tire to be built by the
S company. '
if fl I -
SUCCESSFU L||B®rvK»:: • ■£•;•; L r . <
LEADER Marshal [pAj / .-.VL; CONVALESCING Secretary of/
Pietro Badoglio who , the Navy c,aude A. Swanson, in
led his Italian troops FARM MORTGAGE BILL AUTHORS- w' a ' m ’2Ln‘
into Addis Ababa, cap- senator Lynn Frazier (left) and Representa- COV erino fro an 'll ®
taos Eth op a. . . u <»o«««««« covering from an illness which
I— P 1 tive William Lemke, whose $3,000,000,000 threatened his life for several
> farm mortgage bill was brought to life by a weeks
discharge petition signed by 218 members of
the House. ■
Destructive Storm Hits Detroit
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Two lives were lost and much property damaged by a wind storm which
swept the city of Detroit. The photograph shows a large barn wrecked by the
sixty-mile gale.
THE SKYLAND POST, WEST JEFFERSON, N. C.
MAY ROBSON AT 76
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May Robson, the screen’s “grand old
lady,” celebrated her seventy-sixth
birthday by canning strawberry jelly,
buying herself a new car, promising
herself a trip to London, and signing
a new contract with MGM studios. “My
career is just beginning.” she stated.
“Why, I’m going to work until I’m at
least a hundred.”
HIS 111TH BIRTHDAY
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John Harry Davis, photographed as
he appeared holding his one hundredth
grandchild while celebrating his one
hundred and eleventh birthday on
his farm near Bainbridge, Ohio. Mr.
Davis has nearly 175 descendants,
reads without glasses and still pos
sesses a remarkable memory. Born in
Campbell county, Virginia, In 1825, he
moved to Ohio 75 years ago and has
resided on a farm since that time. The
grandchild is Joe Francis Hansford of
Wilmington, Ohio.
Depression Sent
2 Millions to Farms
Thousands Who Were Unable to
Exist in the Cities Made
Living in Country
Depression days meant moving
days for a great many American
families. Nearly 2,000,000 persons
uprooted themselves from the un
friendly pity and joined in a great
trek toward the open spaces.
The magnitude of this back-to-the
land movement following the 1929
crash is revealed by a new report of
the United States bureau of the cen
sus which shows that some 1,995,253
persons living on farms on the first
day of January, 1935, had lived in
cities, towns, or villages five years
earlier in 1930.
Between the lines of prosaic figu
ures in the census report may be
read the dramatic story of many a
young country John who had start
ed off for the city with high heart to
win his fortune, only to return later,
discouraged, to add yet another hum
an burden to an already heavily tax
ed agricultural region.
That John did not return alone,
but took with him a wife and baby
is revealed by the fact that the
farms for which this movement was
reported had an average of three
newcomers.
“These families have returned to
farms once abandoned, to new farms,
and to unoccupied houses on farms
operated by their relatives and
friends,” states the report.
John did not make his move to a
good farm—to > one where he might
make a living for his family. Food
to fill the hungry mouths of his
family, or even a part of what was
needed, was all he asked. To quote
the matter-of-fact wording of the re
port again:
“These families have probably
augmented very little the total pro
duction of farm products for sale.”
“Most of this migration of families
has been to small farms. There, these
families have sought to produce at
least part ofhetf-inairei-shrdluhmh
least part of the food, particularly
vegetables, eggs, and milk needed
for their own use.”
These migrating millions sought
out their new homes in five mam
regions. The one attracting the great-
AUSTIN ICE CO.
Save it with Ice...
Service with a Smile
, ICE DELIVERY DAYS
WEST JEFFERSON—Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays
JEFFERSON—Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays
WARRENSVILLE and LANSlNG—Tuesdays and Fridays
CRUMPLER and GRASSY CREEK—Thursdays
NATHANS CREEK—Thursdays
TODD—Wednesdays
GLENDALE SPRlNGS—Tuesdays and Fridays
COOPERATE WITH US—BUY YOUR ICE ON THESE DAYS
R. F. AUSTIN, Mgr.
West Jefferson, N. C.
Time Lost os M@miey Lost
It costs money to be sick. You see it di
rectly if your pay envelope is short. You *
lose out on some important work if
live on a farm or if you are one of the few
who are not docked for lost time. You
* can’t afford to show up on the job unless
you are feeling fit. The boss wants re- / WifeWk
suits —not excuses.
How many times do Gas on Stomach, "Head-
ache, Sour Stomach, “That Tired Feeling ’* WMpni
That “Morning After” Feeling, Neuralgic,
Rheumatic, Sciatic, Muscular or Periodic
Pains keep you at home or interfere with
your doing a full day’s work?
AU these troubles are caused or made worse by too much acid
in your body. To correct this condition take £
ALKA=SELTZE R
The, New Pain Relieving, Alkalizing, Effervescent Tablet
It is caUed Alka-Seltzer because it makes a sparkling alkaline
drink, and as it contains an analgesic (Acetyl-Salicylate) it first
relieves the pain of everyday ailments and then by restoring
the alkaline balance corrects the cause when due to excess acid.
Alka-Seltzer is pleasant to take, effective, non-laxative.
"Why don’t you try it? Get a drink at your drug store soda
fountain for a nickel Buy a package for home use.
Large
Small Package 30 cents ~ JC —
One out of every 8 patients receiv
ing treatment for alcolholism is a
farmer. One out of every 9 is a sales
man. One out of every 11 is a mer
chant, and one out of every 40 is a
physician. Finally one out of every
782 had sold liquor.—Keeley Insti- \
tute Report. ' j
A youth of Michigan had saved the
first dollar he ever earned for a doz
en years and spent it recently to pay
for his marriage liscense.
No two persons see the same rain
bow. There must be a different set
of light paths and rays for each posi
tion of the eye that sees them.
It is estimated that about 58,500,-
000 American citizens will be eligi
ble to register and vote in 1936.
est numbers was the Appalachian
subsistence-farmsng area extending
along the hills and mountains from
Pennsylvania to Alabama. This is a
region with agricultural income at
its lowest even in goods times.
J* —
Guaranteed
Every watch is guaranteed
to be put in extra good
shape by workman with 48
year’s experience in watch
repairing.
7-jewel and 15 jewel watches
should be cleaned every 12
months, and 21-jewel and 23-
jewel watches should be clean
ed every 18 months.
Cleaning
PRICE
SI.OO
Your Work Appreciated
J. L. ELLER
West Jefferson, N. C.
JULY 2, 193«

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