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The Democrat. (Scotland Neck, Halifax Co., N.C.) 1884-1896, July 04, 1895, Image 1

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IF YOU ARE HUSTLER
vr-v r. ::.-: -
Business.
TO
f J N 3 S
-; ST I'. AM IS TO-
Macnmery,
E. E. HILLIARD, Editor and Proprietor.
The
Democrat.
(,, i - I ':()'l.I.:.iN'; l'oWICK.
:, nif-o :!lvorti-ofncnt about
K DEMOCRAT,
"EXCELSIOR" IS OUR MOTTO.
SUBSCRIPTION' I'KXCK Sj
VOL. XI.
SCOTLAND NECK, N. C, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1895.
NO. 30.
! 1! VI ' 1 . . v.r i
... -'u.-ro i ti bu:-;.iesK all
I; KYELL,
, -..n.oi" Xew Hotel, Main
NI)
C.
.-it Iii. f fTu-e when
not
. ,'. on.';;-el elsewhere.
.) 2G lv
;;AK WHITEHEAD.
0:
...... v,,-il. c.nier Xew Hotel, Main
Si i.. ni Xr.f'K, X. C.
If fg". Www found at his office when
f ,,..,,,.-;,, ii.-iHy engaged elsewhere.
7 ; iv
0'
x. c. i,ivi:i::.iox.
,-( h-cr J. P. Kay'ri .store.
n-,m to 1 o'clock ; 2 to
2 12 lv
-roTLAXD XECK, X. C.
D
Attorney at Ibaw,
ENFIELD, X. C.
I',--! h-o in all the Courts of Hali
f.iv mid adjoining counties and in the
T.:-fine and Federal Courts. (Maims
i..,!!,M-!fd in all parts of the State.
:; s lv
W,A1'
nrxx.
j T T () J! X i: Y-A T-L A W.
( (! I..VND XfCK, X. C.
wherever
his services are
2 1.5 lv
U. Y. J. WARD,
Surgeon Dentist,
Enfiki.o, X. C.
0 ;k-e over Harrison's Drug Store.
2 7 '.)." ly
E
IiWAUD L. TRAVIS,
Attnn.oy ;.nl Coimst'lor :t Law,
HALIFAX, X. C.
fjjsM.,n ! !.' it'! mi Farm La ml.
2-2 1-1. v
r EVANS,
f JEN ERA L C ARFEXTER.
i ..vialt v
of T racket and Scroll
f all klllf
Work done cheap
; '-ece guaranteed.
- J i
7 lv SCOTLAND XlX'K, X. C.
STILL HERE
JOHNSON
i'h;i th; .rough, knowledge of the
''NI aud a complete outfit of tools
and tuati-rial. I sun Letter prepared than
ever .i do anything that is expected oi
a ;! (.!.. watch-maker and jeweler.
A full line of
Watches, Clocks,
AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
Si'f-tacles and eve" glasses properly
i'r-'ed to the eve. free of charge. All
u r!; l: tin r:iri teed and as low as good
v''""k '"-.in he done.
'',,. M-a-hinr adjusted and re-
g.f&.rnz for mv Lig watch sign at
No-v Dnig Store.
W. II. JOHNSTON.
v.d X( . :r. c.
10 o tf
h HHP
211 1
5
NOW OX HAND.
WILL SKLL THEM CHEAP.
g?A will take contract to
fnnji-ih jots irom y0,000
F"oi- more anvwliere within
S"o0 mile.5 of Scotland Xeck
:,n f"ways furnish what.
.v'i want. Corresoond- &'3
"If If e
1 118 jSWBiBP
Jewelry
if
3 imi
btl"0- and orders sohci ted.jf
D. A. MADDRY,
l-hi-0:,-ly Scotland Xeck, X. C.
MF.XTION THIS 1'AI'EK.
U XEWSPArAHS FOR SALE,
simmo rfs
Are you taking Simmons Liver Reg
ulator, the "King of Liver Medi
cines?" That is what our readers
want, and nothing but that. It is the
same old friend to which the old folks
pinned their faith and were never dis
appointed. But another good recom
mendation for it is, that it is better
than Pills, never gripes, never weak
ens, but works in such an easy and
natural way, just like nature itself, that
relief comes quick and sure, and one
feels new all over. It never fails.
Everybody needs take a liver remedy,
and everyone should take only Sim
mons Liver Regulator.
I5c sure you get it. The Red Z
is on the wrapper. J. H. Zeilin &
Co., Philadelphia,
SHE MADE HOME HAPPY.
"She made home happy !" These few
words I read
Within a churchyard, written on a
etono ;
Xo name, nor date, the simple words
alone
Told me the story of the unknown dead.
A marble column lifted high its head.
Close by, inscribed to one the world had
known,
But, ah ! that lonely grave, with moss
o'er grown,
Thrilled me far more than his who
armies led.
"She made home happy !" Through
the long sad years
The mother toiled, and never stopj:ed
to rest
Until they crossed her hands upon her
breast,
And- closed her eyes, no longer dim wi th
tears.
fhe simiilp. record that she left hehirul
Was grander than the soldier's to ray
mind.
Henry Coyle.
Milk as a Diet.
Sc-K'idii'.c A mcriea a.
I recently tried the experiment of
iving thirty days with only sweet
milk as a nourishment. At the begin-
ning i had no Uiincuuy m cuanginn
mv diet from solid food to liquid. Du
ring the thirty days of the experiment
lost five and one-half pounds in
weight, but I lo.it no strength. I thin-:
I lost the weight because the weather
was warm, and because I took so much
exercise, l roue a oicycie consiuenni
during the time, and used 10-pound
dumb bells and other heavy weights
-r 1 . 1 1 11..
every day except puimas.j x km,.
i s i C .1 T
much more exercise than 1 usually
take, as 1 was aetcrmineu to rest no
thing fairly. On the seventh day of
the experiment I ran several foot races
with a skillful runner, and was beaten
in each race. On the thirtietn day i
ran some more races with the same
person, but did better than in the first
races. This proves that I lost no
trength. I took four pints of milk
daily for the first three weeks of the
experiment, and five pints daily for the
last week. I think that a healthy per-
son snouio. laneiiuuumtu . ...
daily when no other food is being tak-
en. r ursuiK iih .
two hours during the day, commenc
ing at seven o'clock at night. Then I
i i i ,.r till tl-io npvt mnrn-
WOURl iiu iijvjiu mi iaiv a.v,.. .--
31 y principle reason for trying the
t was to endeavor to estab-
experimen
lish the fact that persons convalescing
from sickness may grow stronger with
no other nutriment than sweet milk,
and that they are not obliged to take
"something solid" to eat, as so many
people imagine. Many a convalescent
has gone to his grave as a result of
overtaxing his weak stomach by put
it id r ,.i if Thfi result of
ting SOiKl JOUU illlU 11" -a-a'
the experiment also shows that the
old belief that "bread is the first essen
tial of human life" is erroneous.
I believe that a man could live for
any length of time, and take heavy
exercise all the while, with no other
food than sweet milk.
IT. F. White, M. D.
Crawfordvillo, Ind.
Itls not always the one who makes
the most noise who accomplishes the
most.
AX OBJECTIONABLE MAX
NEGATIVE, STUBOBN, SUSPI
CIOUS. Dispcsiticns GrcTipsd.
Xorfolk Pilot.
Whatever ma' be the individual re
sources and however self-reliant and
wise the individual improvement in
any direction for one's sell or for oth
ers demands wise co-operation and
concerted action. Whether for coun
sel or active aid, there are some men
who always inspire confidence and en
courage united action. In contemplat
ing the work in hand or to be under
taken, we instinctively turn to such
men for both sympathy and help. In
so doing we have no apprehension that
confidence will be betrayed, or that any
honorable purpose will be thwarted.
On the other hand, there are men who
do not invite confidence, whose co-op-peration
we do not seek, and whose aid,
if deemed necessary, we solicit with
misgiving.
These men, possessing various char
acteristics and types, may be generally
described as objectionable men. Some
of these might be grouped as men con
stitutionally incompetent to further
any great venture.
As particulars of this group there are
negative men men who may represent
potential powers, which from some
cause never become active. "Whatever
their abilities or their convictions,
there seems to be an inherent apathy
and torptdity that cannot bo overcome.
If peradventure these men are in posi
tion they represent the possibilities, but
not the actualities of their places. If
they are not in position they would
halt a procession and check the charge
of an army corps to find out their par
ticular place in the rank.
The negative man may stand for the
dignity, but never for the duties of an
office, and in any practical movement
for the improvement of men they have
the inertia of stocks and stones. Allied
to this type is the equivocal man. In
the case of his predecessor the difficul
ty is to get into position and to secure
positive action after getting in. But
the equivocal man has no place j he is
an unknown quantity, and if he repre
sents anything you cannot ascertain
what it is, and if he has any uses
they have not yet been determin
ed. This man is not available for any
good thing, either for himself or for
others. He can neither be placed or
used in any great movement for hu
manity. This group are practically worthless
for concerted action. There is anoth
er subordinate class, and among them
is the stubborn man, who may be hon
est, intelligent .and inclined to well do
ing, but he is constitutionally refracto
ry and has the resistive force that be
longs to the self-willed. He is not firm,
because firmness is a quality that acts
for a reasonable consideration, does not
assume a position wunoui. careau
... . i x t.. i
thought and adheres to it from a con
viction of right. 'Whereas the stub
born man sticks in the place assumed,
because he has assumed it and makes
no concession to the wisdom of his as
sociates. In an emergency he may
subserve a good purpose, but as a rule
he is a clog and an obstruction in all
movements in which he participates.
Allied to the stubborn is the suspi
cious man. This character is generally
b0rn inherits narrowness and the ten
dency to discredit the motives of oth
ers unless absolutely informed of all the
details pertaining thereto. Credulity
is an element m the suspicious charac
ter, and the inherited narrowness that
supplies the root of suspicion is
strengthened and confirmed by the de
ceptions and disappointmens that the
credulous qualities introduce into the
man's life. The suspicious man may,
nrovidentiallv. serve a purpose, but
L 7 - - -
generally he breeds dissension in the
ranks and is a hindrance rather than
an advantage in the the movements in
which he is engaged.
There is still another group that in
tervene in all concerted movements.
Conceding integrity to this group, they
are the most hurtful of any of the gen
eral class of obstructionables. Among
them is the premature man, who, act-
ing upon his impu!-e3 and inadequate
ly conceiving the gravity of his ven
tures, bring' defeat by precipitating a
battle before the reformatory forces are
placed and ready for actum. Like
a thoughtless, impulsive oilicer in corn
bat, he uncovers his own line of battle
prematurely and reveals fo the enemy
information as to his movements that
gives them an advantage in making at
tack. Another of this clas is the sinister
man, who keeps up a personal purpose
back of and different from the com
mon one that elicits his co-operation ;
who is not frank either in his move
ments or in his aims; who subordi
nates the interest of h;s general move
ment to the success of the personal ;
who does not seek to defeat the genenl
movement, and is not unfriendly to it,
but will defeat it rather than sacrifice
some individual end in which he is in
terested. The premature man unin
tentionally, thoughtlessly and impru
dently may bring disaster upon an un
dertaking or movement and yet be per
fectly honest in purpose, but the sinis
ter one is untrustworthy in every exi
gency where there is possibility of a
clash between his personal aims and
the broader and better aims ot concert
ed action.
Success demands positive and une
quivocal characters, firmness and con
ciliation, prudence and unselfishness,
and where these qualities are lacking
all movements are handicapped and
embarassed. Yet even these difficul
ties can be surmounted and must be
overcome in the actions that look to
the advancement and protection of the
interest of the individual and society,
and these obstructions should not dis
courage, but simply call forth a larger,
more patient and more persistent effort
for humanity from us.
Fores Exerted "by the Human Jaws.
Scientfic American.
Dr. G. V. Blask. a dentist of Jackson
ville, Fla., has made some interesting
experiments upon the force exerted by
the human jaws in the ordinary masti
cation of lood, and also the greatest force
which the jaws are capable oi exerting.
By means of a spring instrument
provided with a registering device he
took records of about 150 "bites" of
different persons. Of these, fifty have
been preserved as characteristic of the
ordinary man, woman and child. The
smallest pressure recorded was .'30
pounds, ;by a little girl seven years old.
This was with the incisors. The high
est record was male by a physician of
thirty-five. The instrument used only
registered 270 pounds, and he simply
closed it together without apparent ef
fort. There was no method of deter
mining how far above 270 pounds he
could have gone. This test was made
with the molars. Several persons ex
ceeded a force of 100 pounds with the
incisors and 200 with the molars. The
physical condition of the persons ex
perimented upon seemed io have a lit
tle bearing upon the result. Dr.
Black is of the opinion that the condi
tion of the peridental membranes is the
controlling factor, rather than muscu
lar strength.
Dr. Black found that, in the habitu
al chewing of food, much more force is
exerted than is necessary. In chewing
a piece of beef steak, the crushing
point of which was from 10 to 4i
pounds, from 00 to 80 pounds stress
was actually employed at each thrust
of the teeth. The principal articles of
food tested had crushing points as fol
lows : Steak, 40 to 45 pounds ; mut
ton chops, 35 to 40 pounds ; broiled ham,
45 to GO pounds ; roast beef, 45 to 60
pounds ; pork chops, 20 to 25 pounds,
and the choicest parts of cold broiled
beef tongue, 3 to 5 pounds. The tough
er parts of beef and mutton required a
crushing force of 00 pounds m some
instances.
Begin slow ; it is the pace at the
end of the race that wins.
When Ba'oy waa nclr, re are her Cartorla.
When she wa a Child, she cried for Castori.
When she became Miss, che cuing to Caatoria.
'Vhen slio ha J Children, she gare thm Castori.
viva a,aa VnaaJ Wv
Th price of rorti i- ri-ir.and a
deal of it !s tsudmg it- way t n .oluf,
and find- ready K-tle. The ri-t in corn
is due to the scarcity of it at pre-r-nt,!
with the pro-oct of a short i-ni h
year. !bil-esu county, hitd. f r -ev-.
eral years, ba- !eon vein;.' with Hvih-i
county in its production, will, no'C--- j
?arily, make a short corn crop U.h
vear, owing to the rava-es of the bud
and cut worms which are ."til! plyir t
their vocation, encouraged by the t'"oi
nights, which, up to this ear, hae
ceased with the warm weather the l.i-t
of May. The stand of cotton i jd-o
imierfect, but the cotton plant him
facilities for spreading out in the open
ing, which corn does not enj'jy. But
with it all our jeople may realize full
crops. Last year, as all will recall, the
season was very unpropitious, and yet
the crops of corn and cotton, especially,
were the largest for years.
Farmers, generally, are getting their
lands in a good state ot cultivation by
deep plowing and regular fertilizing, so
that the soil responds readily to good
seasons and the crops grow rapidly.
With indifferent preparation of the
soil last year the crops would have been
a failure, as it was they were a gratify
ing success. This is to the credit of
the thoroughness of the farmers.
The Great Business Revival.
Norfolk Viryinii n.
The "Wilson tariff, says the Washing
ton Pont, is giving a gocxl account of
itself in all quarters. The improve
ment in trade and manufactures is so
marked, the evidences of returning
prosperity are so numerous and con
vincing that the voico of the croaker is
no longer heard in the land. Since
last April more than iJOO manufactur
ing establishments have, of their own
motion, increased the wages of more
than 500,000 workmen. There is less
disquiet in labor circles than there has
been at any time during the pa.-t ten
years. The iron industry is the be.-t
guage of business. When that is pros
perous all other industries are general
ly in good condition. As an indication
of the effects of the new tariff on this
guage, it is stated that since January
last, Bessemer pig iron in Pittsburg
has advanced from 10.00 per ton to
$1 2.50 ; steel billets commanded then
$14.75 and to-d-ry they market at $ 1.
00 ; gray forging bar is now worth $10.
85, and the best refined bar iron has
increased to if'2S, an advance of -f 3.3.5.
The wages of labor in the furnaces and
mills and in the coal region have cor
respondingly advanced.
Two "Wonderful Boys.
Wilmington Menxengrr.
Out West there are two very youth
ful evangelists, both Baptists. Iryin
Leake, of Illinois, is 17 years old. He is
pastor of the First Baptist church at
Mount Carmel, 111., the youngest in
the United .States. lie is reported as
gifted with oratory. Ray York, but
.13, was lorn in Missouri. He showed
marked piety when not 0 years of age.
He is fairly well educated and is still
at school. He joined the Baptists in
1804. He soon showed gifts and bent
for evangelistic work. He has beendi
censed to preach by a Chicago church,
but desires to prosecute his studies be
fore ordination, and expects to attend
the .Southern Baptist Theological Sem
inary at Louisville, after first attending
William Jewell college in Missouri.
The Chicago Record says of this infant
prodigy :
'Even when a mere child his strong
religious trend began to develop. When
visiting his friends or when visited by
them, his favorite pastime was to pl.:y
'meeting.' He would not only talk
and pray himself, but would encourage
them to do the same."
That reminds us of tho laie eloquent
Rev. Thomas G Lowe, the orator of the
Ijeautiful. When a little fellow he
used to mount the rail fence and
preach to the negro children who stood
in front. That was in the parental
home five miles from Enfield, in Hali
fax county.
THROW IT AWAY.
rr :.-i if :
fiuktit.m' '1 r. .-
tl t:, tvr r x u'-v. X . : vf!Mi i
i.-.r.atT main n, trt u .:. i
HERNIA liur-t urn,
or i t what y t-Txu-.4l)
and wiltwut l Am!bf
Triumph In Conrvtiv Surfiry
1 th curr, i l
TT7Hfm?Q Ova-in. nt-roiil ant t-iha-r
W-, Without tl larrifal
cf cuttiriir --r:tl'it.
PILE TUMORS, I'ATuiir.n Itif
rtim-aoi- of tlK lowrr tx-wa-l. -iiiuj'lJjr urvl
i w 1111' L'",,r r,,,m'r ,h '''-
CTMXTr in Hi lUa l.Vr. no matter how
O 1 lit )rirv. w oruh-A. -u!Tc-r iiol.
anil wnh'1 out. thu avo'. l.LR tu!iE.
QTOTPTTTT?!? urinary ,.!!'
O 1 All 1 U IXCJ ni, rviiM..l .;( ut
cutting. At-viii'laut lti-fTtn. arJ l'i.j l-ii-t.,.n
alovi" UlFVjw. writ txmU-1. In l inin rtl
vHofm, h ct. mail., . WcKihn lMt t
HT MatXiICAl A&o-.ATIQ. liuSalo, M. V.
MKNTto THIS 1 Al i i;.
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COPYRIGHTS.
CA I O ITf A IK A PA TEXT ? F"r a
Rrompt anpwer and an bonest opinion. wr' to
II.'N X V ".. who have had neirlT lift t -t'
cjtperitnce in tho pat'.'nt bumn;ka. Otmiuuin' ;t
tions strictly confidential. A llancltMiak t In.
lorraation conrcrnioit Pnlrntx ana hrw t ob.
tain them cent tree. Alao rataloguo oi xucchar
icnl ana acientitio hooka xent tn e.
l'at-nt taken tbrouch Munn & Co. rcrrttt
ppecial notice in tha !rif ntillr Aiucri nn,
thus arc brought wii'iy bvroretlin i::.:h; iti
out cost to the inventor. Thm lcti;!..l tni- r.
iFHuert weekly, rlceantiy illtiKtratit. hn l r far i im
larirect rircul!tiu of any bcipjiIiijc worn in Uo
world. S: a year. Maniple copti-f tc-i-t lre-.
nuildiniz Kdition, monthly, fl.'iOa year, hinclo
copies, '
tiful platen, in colors, ami pbototrraT'lia of n vr
boufe. with plana, enabling- Vuilrt.TS t- nh t.'io
latent ooeitinn and necurw contra'-t. An.in -s
MUSS it CO M.W Vouii. aiil I'.uuaijWAT.
s.i cents, f.very nun,
'very riuruber cotitmtiii t .-au.
Southern Hotel,
HA LI TAX, X. ('.
FlKST Cl.A-S A'-' iMM"!'.VIl..- loj;
i m: J'i m.ir.
The Far" Thf P'.-st Th" Mnrht Ajfirh.
Mi:s. ('. '. TlLI.KKY, I
Mi:s. John H. Kknnku. i
2 21 Urn
Man;
!'.'T-
a Ola-
TASTELESS
IS JUST AS COO D FOR ADULTS.
WARRANTED. PRICE GOcts.
Gal ati a. III... N v. 1-, ).
Paris Medicine Co., ft. Ljuh, Jl.
;fn!Ti.-n: We t4 lv-t yt.ir. fa" V.f.ta cf
nil' 'VK'S TASTELK.-S CI1IIl. ll'Mf a.'J's iravtf
Lomrbl U.."e prc" airva-Jy tins jenr. In a'! ',r ft-pent-i-r-e
f H yean.. In Ihu Cru bus: ?-. ttnrm
Dever soli an artirle that tiav twb nuivtrl aaiaa
Iax:UwU M juUX Xuiaic Vour truly, , .
-Fr sale :.n 1 guarantee 1 hy
E. T. WHITflHKAD v'c CO.,
6 6 Cm bcotLuidjXeck, X. C.
Mil
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DR. H. 0. HYATT'S SANATORIUM,
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Physicians' Proscripiior
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7 12 IV
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"4
Dims
Paten
X
40 cts. per hundred.

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