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"ALL POWERS, NOT HEREIN DELEGATED, REMAIN WITH THE PEOPLE." Constitution of N. C.
OKI) SERIES, VOL. 50.
NEW SERIES, VOL. 1. J
TARBORO', N. C, FRIDAY, JULY 31, 1874.
NO.
n 1 1
VI
GENERAL DIRECTORY.
TAnnoiii)'.
M tuR John 1Sorfl,C
Comvis-'Ioxfrs Benj.Norflt. Joseph Cobb, !l.
C. Cherry and Goorge Mutiw9un.
StcRtTARt and TRiiSORK Uobert Whitehiirst.
Constb!-J. B. riyat.
lowx Watch Harry Redmond, Bill P.aitle and
J .invs E. Simonson.
COUNTY.
Superior Court Clerk and Probate Judge -John
Norfleet.
Register of Deed -B. J. Keeeh.
SherijF Battle Bryan.
Coroner Won. T. Godwin.
Treasurer RobtH. Austin.
.Siriyr Jesse Harrell.
School Examiners. II. II. Shaw, Wiu. A.
Duggan and R. S. Williams.
Keeper Poor House Vim. A. Dugcan.
Commissioners M. P. Edwards, Chairman,
W m. A. DuifB, N. B. Bellamy, and Mac
Matbowson. B. J. Keech, Clerk.
MAILS.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTIHIK UF MAILS
NORTH AN1 SOUTH VIA W. & W. R. tt.
Leave Trboro' (daily) at - - A- M.
Arrive st Tarboro' (daily) at J0l.;.
WASHINGTON MAIL VIA OREF.NVIL1-K.
FALKLAND AND SPARTA.
Leave Tarboro' (daily) at - -Arrive
at Tarboro' (daily) at - - t I . :m.
LODUES.
Xl NieUt and the Place ot Meetingf.
Concord R. A. Chapter No. 5 N M. Law
rence Hi"U Priest, Masonic Hall, monthly
convocations first Thursday lu evury month at
10 o'clock A- M.
Concord Lodge No. 58, Thomas Gatlin,
Master, Masonic Hall, meets first Friday night
t 7 o'clock P. M. and third Saturday at 10
o'clock A. M. in every month.
Repiton Encampment No. 13, I. O. O.F.,
Dr Jos. H. Baker, Chief Patriarch, Odd Fel
lows' Hall, meets every first and third Thurs
day of each month. ,
Edgecombe Lodge No. 50, I. O. O. F.,
J. HBaker, N. G., Odd Fellows' Hall, meets
every Tuesday nighL
Edgecombe Council No. 132, Friends of
Temperance, meet every Friday night at the
Odd Fellows Hall.
Advance Lodge No. 28, I. O. G. T., meets
every Wednesday night at Odd Fellows' Hall
CHURCHES.
Episcopal Church Services every Sunday
at 10 1-2 o'clock A. M. and 5 P. M. Dr. J. B.
Cheshire, Rector. .
Methodist Church Services every third,
Sunday at 11 o'clock. Rev. C. C. Dodson
Pastor.
Presbyterian Church Services second Sun
day of each month at 11 o'clock A. M. and
8 o'clock P. M. Rev. J. W. Primrose, Evan
gelist. Missionary Baptist Church Services the
2nd Sunday in every moith, at 11 o'clock.
Rev. T. R. Owen, Pastor.
Primitive Baptist Church Services first
Saturday and 8unday of each month at 11
o'clock.
HOTELS,
Adams' Hotel, corner Main and Pitt Sts.
O. F. Adams, Proprietor.
Mrs. Pender's, (formerly Gregory Hotel,)
Main Street, opposite "Enquirer" Office,
Mrs. M. Pender, Proprietress.
BANKS.
Bank of New Hanover, on Main Street,
nest door to Mr. M. Weddell. Capt. J. D.
dimming, Cashier. Office hours from 51 A.
M. to 3 P. M.
EXPRESS.
Sonih'jrn Express Office, on Main Street,
closes tvery morning atfl)-s o'clock.
N. M. Lawrence, Agent.
ONE BOX
PERFECT CURE
FOR
Chills and Fever.
PERFECT PREVENTIVE
OF
Chilis and Fever.
No Quinine I No Mercury 1
No Arsenic!
Dr. Bellamy's Pills!
This invaluable medicine involves a per
fectly New Treatment of Chills and Fever,
and will effectually cure and root out the dis
ease from the system.
1. All other remedies must not be taken
when the chill and fever lit is on ; put the
" Bellamy " Pill can be taken just as safely
when the Jit is actuliy on as at any other time.
Taken once a week during tLo season of
Chills and Fever, they will Positively ward
otf and Prevent an Attack making a resi
dence in the most infected districts perfectly
safe.
2. The " Bellamy " Pill Is also a sure rem
edy in all cases of Intermittent Fever, Remit
tent Fever, Typhoid Fever ; Sick Headache,
Indigestion, and Liver Complaints of all
kinds.
3. After you are entirely discouraged and
hopeless and all other remedies have failed,
make oae more trial, procure one dux 01
Bellamy's Pills and take them. The proprie
tor guarantees you an absolute and perfect
cure.
Reference Is made to the extraordinary cure
of Professor Lawrence, Principal of the In
stitutes of Elocution at New York and Phila
delphia. He says as follows :
" About ten years ago, while residing in
New Jersey, I had a violent attack of chills
and fever. The chill would come on regular
lv about ten o'clock, and continues for near
ly two hours, followed by a burning fever for
more than five hours, wnicti no meaicine
would relieve; and I became so weak that I
could hardlv walk across the room, and could
not ascend one flight of stairs in less time
than ten minutes. My life became a burden
to me. 1 loathed everv kind of food, aud
every kind of food, and even water tasted to
me like copperas. 1 could get no refreshing
sleep either by night or by day; the medi
cines prescribed for me by physicians gave
me no relief, and I was fast sinking into ihe
grave. One day a lady persuaded me to pur
chase a box Bellamy's Pills. I took three at
twelve o clock noon, and three at night. Al
ter taking the two doses I felt better, and that
night, for the first time iu three months,slupt
for fully eight hours. The next morning I
felt much better, and took three more pills-
As ten o'clock approached I prepared myself
for mv daily chill, but to my intense joy my
unwelcome visitor did not come ; and after
eating a hearty dinner at one o'clock, I took
three more nills. and at nitrht three more.
The next morning, after a delightful night's
rest, 1 arose at seven o'clock, feeling quite
well : and although still very weak, yet 1 was
able to enjoy my food, and whether eating or
drinking, everything tasted sweet and pleas
ant to me. In about seven days' time I was
strong enough to walk four miles, and felt
perfectly cured. Ten years have elapsed
4nse then, aud I have never had anothei at-
u-k of ChiUs and V ever.
" P. LAWRENCE,
" New Yoik Conservatory of Music,
" 5 fcast 14th Street."
In conclusion, the proprietor has only to
Bute that he will guarantee to cure any case
of Chills and Fever. No fee will ever in such
case be exacted. The patient is at liberty to
pay or not.- All that is desired is, that he
will forward a certificate of his cure at an ear
ly date.
PRICE, ONE DOLLAR PER BOX.
Sold by all Druggists throughout the States
and Territories.
8ent by mail to any address on receipt of
price.
l'HILIP A. "V HENCK,
PROPRIETOR,
23 Dey Street, New York.
For sale by WM. HOWARD, Druggist,
larnoro', Si. C.
MISCELLANEOUS.
r wilier - -
Dr. J. Walker's California Tin
egar Bitters aro a purely Vegetable
preparation, mado chiefly from tbo na
tive herbs found on tho lower ranges of
the Sierra Nevada mountains of Califor
nia, tho medicinal properties of which
aro extracted therefrom without tho uso
of Alcohol. Tho question is almost
daily asked, ""What is tho cause of tho
unparalleled success of Vinegar Bit
tees T" Our answer is, that they rcmovo
tho causo of disease, and the patient re
covers his health. They aro tho great
blood purifier and a life-giving principle,
a perfect Renovator and Invigorator
of tho system. Never before in tho
history of the world has a medicine been
compounded possessing tho remarkable
qualities of Vixkgais Bitters in healing tho
sick of every disease man is heir to. They
are a gentlo Purgative as well as a Tonic,
relieving Congestion or Inflammation of
tho Liver ana Visceral Organs ia Bilious
Diseases
The properties of De. walker's
Visega- Bitters are Aperient, Diaphoretic,
Carminative, Nutritions, Laxative, Diuretic,
Sedative, Counter-irritant Sudorilic, Altera
tive, and Anti-Bilious.
r. ii. Mcdonald & CO.,
Drnirrists and Gen. Apts., San Frnncisco. California,
and cor. of Washington and Charlton Sts., N. V.
Sold by all Druggists and Dealers.
KEARNEY'S
FLUID EXTRACT
The only known retedv for
BRIGHT'S DISEASE,
And a positive remedy for
GOUT, GRAVEL, STRICTURES, DIABE
TES, DYSPEPSIA, NERVOUS
DEBILITY, DROPSY,
Non-retention or Incontinence of Urine, Ir
ritation, Inflamation or Ulceration of the
BLADDER & KIDNEYS,
SPERMATORRHEA,
Lfciicorrhoea or Whites, Diseases of the Pros
trate Gland, Stone in the TJadder,
Coleulus Gravel or Brickdust Deposit and
Mucus or Milky Discbarges.
KEARNEY'S
EXTRACT BUCHU
Permanently Cures al! Diseases of the
BLADDER, KIDNEYS, AND DROPSICAL
WLLLlJNuS,
Existing in Men, Women and Children.
NO MATTER WHAT THE AGE.
Prof. Steele says : " One bottla of Kear
ney 8 rmd Lxtract uuchu is worm more
than all other Buchus combined."
Price, One Dollar per Bottle, or Six Bot
tles for Five Dollars.
Depot, 104 Duane St., New York
A Physician in attendance to answer cor-
respondenca and give advice gratis.
3?" Send Stamp for Pamphlets, free."
-TO THE-
Nervous and Debilitated
OF BOTH SEXES.
Ab Charge for Advice and Consultation.
Dr. J. B. Dyott, graduate of Jefferson
Medical College, Philadelphia, author of
several valuable works, can be consulted on
all diseases of the Sexual or Urinary Or
gans, (which he has made an especial
study ) either in male or female, no matter
from what cause originating or of how long
standing. A practice of SO years enables
him to treat diseases with success. Cures
guaranteed. Charges reasonable. Those
at a distance can forward lettes describing
symptoms and enclosing stamp to prepay
postage.
Send for the Guide to Health, fnee 10c.
J. B. DYOTT, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon, 104 Daane St., N. Y.
JAS. LEFFEL'S
IMPROVED EOUELE
Turbine Water Wheel.
Poole Sc XXniit,
Manufacturers for the South and Southwest.
Nearly 7000 now in use, working under heads
varying from 2 to 240 feet ! 24 sizes,
from h to 0(5 inches.
The most powerful Wheel in the Market.
And mos-t economical in use of Water.
Large illustrated Pamphlet seut post free.
MANUFACTUREKS, ALSO, OF
Portable and Stationary Steam Engines and
Boilers, Babcock & Wilcox Patent Tubulous
Boiler, Ebaugh's Crusher for Minerals, Saw
and Grist Mills, Flouring Mill Machinery,
Machiuery for White Lead Works and Oil
Mills, Shafting Pulleys and Hangers.
SEND FOR CIRCULARS.
Feb. 20, 1874. Uiu
J. A. WILLIAMSON
0
arnase
AT HIS OLD STAND,
TARBORO', N. C.
ANY style of Vehicles made to order at
short notice.
BW Special attention paid to REPAIR
ING, and executed with dispatch.
Oct. 11, 1873.-tf.
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Nearly aU diseases originate from Iudiges-
tion and Torpidity of the Liver, and reliel is
always ui.-xiously sought ufu.r. If the Liver
is Regulated in its action, health i.i almost in
varialily secured.. Want of action in the Liv
er causes Headache, Constipation, Jaundice,
Pain in the Shoulders, Cou-th, Chills, Dizzi
ness, toLir Stomach, bad taste in the mouth,
bi'iius attacks, palpitation of the heart, de
pression of spirits, or the blues, and a hun
dred other symptoms, for which SIMMONS'
T.l VER RFHI'f.ATOK i t!i- le.t rempilv
! tint has ever been discovered. It nets mildly,
I effectually, and be'ng a simple vegetable
compound, can do no injury in any quantities
I that it may be taken. It is harmless in every
I way; it has been ustd for 40 years, and hnu
I drcds ol the good and great Iroin all parls of
the courtry will vouch for its liii the pu
! rest and best.
SIMMONS'
LIVER REGULATOR,
OR
lYltUlUINt.
Is harmless.
-I
Is no drastic violent medicine.
Is sure to earn U tak"U regularly.
Is no inmxiea'Iiig beverage.
Is c fuiililvs family medicine.
Is the cheapest medicine in tire world.
Is given wiih safety aiid the happiest results
to the most delicate infant,
Does not interfere with business.
Does not disarrange the system.
Takes the place of Quinine and Bitters of
every lclud, i
Contains the simplest remedies.
FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
Piedmont Air-Line Railway.
RICHMOND & DANVILLE, RICHMOND
& DANVILLE R. W.. N. C. DIVIS
ION, AND NORTH WEST
ERN N. C. K. W.
CONDENSED TIME TABLE-
In effect ou and after Sunday, June 14, 1874.
GOING NORTH.
stations. Mail. Express.
Leave Charlotte 7.00 p. m. 8.85 a.m.
Air-Line Jcfn, 7.23 " 8.56 "
" Salisbury, 9.52 " 10.54 "
" Greensboro' 2.15 a.m. 1.15 p.m.
" Danville. 5.13 " 3.36 "
" Dundee, 5.25 " 3.48 "
" Burkville, 11.30
Arrive at Richmond, 2.22 r. m. 11.04 "
G(7lNG SOUTH.
stations. Mail. Express.
Leave Richmond, 1.38 p. m.
" Burkville, 4.41 "
" Dundee, 9.25 "
" Danville, 9.29 "
' Greensboro', 12 40 a. m.
" Salisburv, 3.38
" Air-Line Jnct'n,6.24 "
Arrive at Charlotte, 6.30 "
11.45 p. m.
2.52 a. m.
8.83 "
8.37 "
11.58 "
2 51 r. m.
4.54 "
5.00 "
GOING EAST.
GOING WEST.
STATIONS.
Mail.
Mail.
L've Greensboro',
' Co. Shops,
1.30 a.m. . A rr.l 1.40am
3.15 " 10.15 "
Raleigh, c. 7.30a.m. 3
5.41 "
Arr. atGoUsboro, 10.20 " L've 2.30p.m
NORTH WESTERN N. C. R. R.
(SALEM BRANCH.)
stations.
Mail. Express.
Leave Greensboro' 1.30 a m. 4.05 p. m.
Arrive at Salem, 3.00 " 5.50 "
Leave Salem, 10.00 p. m. 8.00 a. m.
Arrive at Greensboro 11.30 " 9.45 "
Passenger train leaviDg Raleigh at 5.41
j P. M., connects at Greensboro with the
.Northern bound train ; making the quickest
time to all Northern cities. Price of Tick
ets same as via other routes.
Trains to and from points East of Greens
boro' connect at Greensboro' with Mail
Trains to or from points North or South.
Trains daily, both ways.'
On Sundays Lychburg Accommodation
leave Richmond at 9.42 A. M., arrive at
Burkeville 12.35 P. M., leave Burkeville 4.35
A. M., arrive at Richmond 7.58 A. M.
Pullman Palace Cars on all night trains
between Charlotte and Richmond, (without
change.)
For further information address
S. E. ALLEN,
Gen'l Ticket Agent,
Greensboro, N. C.
T. M. E.. TALCOTT,
Engineer & Gen'l Superintendent.
05
ens
at
S0 5-5p .
0 y o a
0 A r O 1(
O U o
A e a 3 'a a
t3 5 -3 M
O i.'
VAT iTJA'niiE
TOWN PROPERTY
FOR SALE OR HUNT.
THE residence of Mrs. M. E. Lewis,
with about four acres of land.
The house ccntainp eight rooms. On
the lot are KITCHEN, SERVANT'S HOUSE,
DAIRY, SMOKE HOUSE, GREEN HOUSE
and STABLES, all ia good repair. This
property Is
VERY DESIRABLE,
being situated in the pleasantest part of the
town.
BT The FURNITURE will be disposed
of privately.
Apply to M. WEDDELL & CO.
Tarboro', March 13, 1874. tf.
SIO S20
per day. Agents
wanted everywhere. Par-
ticuiars tree.
Mo.
H. Blair & Co., St. Louis,
THE
FRIDAY,
JULY 31, 1874
SITTING IP EOH THE COMET.
by olive Thorn e.
! We were determined to Bit up
for the comet, that famous twelfth
of August all six of us. But
auntie wasn't to know a word of it,
by no means. We knew well
enough that her good common
sense would send us off to bed, with
the remark that " we'd see it soon
enough if it strack us that night."
So we went around all day whis
pering in corners and otherwise
making most elaborate attempts at
secrecy. Auntie was unusually
dull for her, and sent us to-bed cs
usual, without a suspicion.
Our plan was to rendezvous in
the school room, and during the
day we had surreptitiously and on
various pretenses abstracted sundry
stores of cookies, pickles, peaches,
etc., which wv hid in the desks ;
for we had heard that people who
sat up all night got ferociously
hungry. Books and papers also
were provided, to help while away
the hours.
I Nini and J were the first to ar
rive, and we came softly in the
dark, and sat down to wait for the
rest. Now " utter and intense si
lence " was the stern condition ims
posed on every aspirant for that
night's honors, and, as Auntie had
j not yet gone to bed, the necessity
was especially binding.
Next to come was Harry osten
tatiously tipstoeing down the stairs,
which developed new capacities for
squeaking at every step.
' Mercy on us ! I never heard
those stairs groan so!' exclaimed
Nini.
But on he came, and reached the
door. Now that door had a pecu-.
liar and especial creak of its own ;
but long practice had taught the
children of the house how to open
it in silence. Unfortunately, we
had forgotten to explain
to Harry who was a visitor and
he opened the door with superna
tural caution, the result of which
was an elaborate and long-drawn-cut
scrauch of the very worst kind.
' Sh-h-h-h !' we both broke out, in
sepulchral tones, like hoarse steam
engines. ' Who is it
4 Its
me
faintly.
' V ho sine:
' Harry. Where are you ;' was i
the reply.
' Well don't make so much noise,
for gookne8s sake !'
' 1 ain't. I am as still as a
mouse.' In proof of which he stum
bled over a chair.
Thunder !' he growled. ' Why
don't you keep your old chairs out
of the way ? And why don't you
have alight?' tragically.
Phinney is the committee on
lights.' said Nini. ' And he went
downstairs to get one that was full
enough to burn all night. But I
guess he had to wait to bore an oil
well. He's been gone long enough.'
Harry and I laughed, and just
then we heard Auntie's door.
'There's Mother!' cried Nini
excitedly.
We stuffed our hankerchiefs into
our mouths, and sat, like other
guilty conspirators, in the dark
while Auntie's innocent footsteps
went through the hall. After she
had returned to her room another
step came on. The door was opens
ed scientifically by one who knew
how, and never made a sounnd.
This was how: First the knob
was turned very gently, till unlatch
ed ; and then the door was violent
ly and suddenly jerked open.
Phinney entered, and shut the door
by the same process ; and that was
a nicer operation, because he must
bring up the jerk before the door
hit the casing.
lie had the lamp and some
matches, which he gave Nini to
ight, while he took off the lamp-
chimney. The match was one of
those diablical inventions made for
the torment of nervous people,
which goes off with a crack like a
fire-cracker. So, when Nini drew
it across a desk, we all jumped as
though we were shot, dropped books,
upset stools, and otherwise kept
perfectly still !
Then, of course, we laughed; and
this was but a specimen of our death
ly silence. Phinney stepped on
Alice's dress on the stairs, throw-
iug her down with a crash ; Harry
and Lila, creeping along like bur
glars through the hall, collided, and
dropped books with a noise such as
only books can make ; cilice kicked
over a water-pitcher in her room
and Seth stumbled over his father's
boots at his door. After awhile
we settled down, and agreed to
divide into three watches of two
hours each, with two in a watch.
The rest went to bed, and Nini and
I sat down to our books. Auntie
would now and then promenade the
hall, She seemed to be restless.
guess she felt excitement in the
air- As soon as we heard her door,
we turned down the lamp till but a
spark was left, and held our breath
till she returned to her room.
During these temporary eclipses
we made vigorous onslaught on the
provisions; and once, at such a
time, the door burst open in its
quiet -way, making us start like
thieves, and Phinney's head stuck
in.
I say, girls, don't you eat up all
the things !'
'You go to bed, and don't fidget,'
said Nini in her most dignified
older-sisterly air.
Cookies, peaches, books, and ex
citement kept us alive through our
two hours ; and when the hall clock
struck' twelve we started as by
agreement, to call Lila and Alice.
Now the door into their room had
another peculiar kink it stuck at
the top. " To open it quietly, there
fore, one had to stoop and pull
down on the knob. Nini stooped
and pulled. The door sprang open,
and Nini sat down at the same in
stant. Pleased with her unusul,
success, and not caring for her un
dignified set-down (since there were
no boys to laugh at her), she sprang
up, as she did so, hitting the door
with her foot and shutting it tbht
with a bang, of course.
The look of blank dismay, as she
settled back on the floor, was too
comical ; and we had another laugh,
with hankerchiefs stuffed in, as be
fore.
The next attempt was successful,
and we went in to call the girls.
But these quondam watchers were
sound asleep ; and, when violently
aroused by shakes and calls, they
didn't care a fig for the comet and
didn't want to see it hadn't a bit
of curiosity and wished we'd let
them alone.
An application to the boys had
the same result. And slowly, in
dignantly we stalked off to-bed,
resolved not to do all the watching,
if we never saw the old thing. And
we never did.
The Cultivation of the Grasses.
In some sections of our country
the cultivation of the grasses has
not attracted that care and atten
tion to which they are entitled, but
the time has now arrived that this,
as well as other productions of the
soil, is becoming a necessity to our
andholders, inasmuch as the com
petition of the Great West in the
production of the cereals requires a
greater diversity in our husbandry
than we have heretofore considered
necessarv. The labor question also
presses upon us, both in regard to
scarcity and high price, and we are
obliged to consider the remedies at
our command for the difficulties
with which we are encompassed.
Fruit growing for the 6upply of our
own as well as distant lands, is
oommg up largely in sections of
our own and adjacent States, and
this business, with the aid of can
ning and fruit drying, is taking up
arge tracts of land which have
heretofore been mainly devoted to
the production of wheat and corn.
With the same assistance the grow
ing of early vegetables must soon be
a business requiring large tracts of
and ; the extent of this latter pur
suit may be imagined from the fact
that a single tarm in Jf ennsylvania,
in addition to the immense fields
employed in the growing of seeds,
or the cultivation of which steam
engines have been introduced, have
a farm of six hundred acres on the
Rappahannock, in Virginia, for the
growing of vegetable seeds alone.
Other sections, again, require pas
ture lands, for the supply of the
immense demand made for the milk
and butter required for the support
of the multitudes of non-producers
of these necessaries of life, espe
cially in our cities and towns ; and
when it is considered that in a citv
like Baltimore, with a population
rising three hundred thousand souls,
every individual requires to be sup
plied with either one or both of
these productions of the dairy, the
imagination can form some concep
tion of the amount ot land required
upon which to feed the cattle that
are necessary for the supply, to
say nothing of the other stock also
to bo led from the same source ;
and these demands are supplement--ed
in some of the States by the re
quirements of the cheese dairies ;
in some of which tho milk of as
many as two thousand cows is em.
ployed. The hay crop is conse quently
one of the most important
of any of the crops raised in this
country, and, great as it now is, all
the tendencies are to a still more
extended demand to supply the
necessities of this progressive age.
So important is this conceived to be
that a philosopher's remark that he
who could make two blades of grass
crass grow where but one grew be
fore, is a greater benefactor to his
race than the whole host ot pouti
cians, is accepted as a truism in
every civilized land. AH the light
consequently, that can be thrown
upon the subject of the cultivation
os the grasses, it is the bounden
duty of the controllers ot the pres3
to present to their readers, and it is
one in which we have ever felt it
our peculiar privilege and duty to
keep prominently before the public ;
and oh! that we could only induce
more of the tillers of the soil to read
and reflect, and to experiment, so
that they could be lifted out of the
ruts iu which they are travellers,
merely because their fathers before
them had travelled in the same
routine for generations gone by.
But, thanks to the institution of the
thousands of farmers' clubs and
associations, to say nothing of the
innumerable granges, thit are be
ing established everywhere, of the
" Patrons of Husbandry," whom it
is to be hoped will eventually be
found engaged in the same good
work of their brethren of the plough,
organized under other titles, in the
dissemination-of useful information
among their fellow-craftsmen. A
better day is approaching for the
tillers of the soil, who are now just
realising that they are a power in
the State, and that they have a
right to be heard in the legislation
of the country, and that their wish
es shall no longer be disregarded
by the demagogues who have too
frequently used the power given to
them by the people for their own
aggrandizement and emolument at
the expense of their constituents.
Flint, in his great work on grass
es and forage plants, describes 124
varieties of grass, natural and arti
ficial, known in his own State alone
(Massachusetts), a few of which we
shall allude to at tlii3 time, among
those best known to our section.
Timothy (or herd grass, as it is
called in New England) is more
generally cultivated than any of
the other cultivated grasses, and is
considered as unsurpassed by any
other to cut for hay. It is liked
by all kinds of stock, and is bes
lieved to contain more nutritive
matter than any other of the grass
es. It is somewhat coarse and
hard, if it is allowed to ripen its
seed, but if cut in the blossom or
directly after, it is much relished.
With us it is generally sown with
the wheat in the fall, and followed
by sowing clover on the same field ;
but some of the best practical farm
ers are beginning to discontinue
this practice on account of the dif
ference in the time of blooming of
the two crops, especially when the
ordinary June clover is used. The
timothy being invariably later, it
must be cut too green, before blos
soming, when the loss is great by
shrinkage , and when the nutritive
matter is considerably less than
at a later period, or else, the clover
must stand too long, when there is
an equally serious loss of nutritive
matter in that. Mr. 7ra Porter,
in a very interesting paper upon
this subject, read before the Wes
tern New York Butter Makers' As
sociation and Farmers' Club, says
that timothy seems not well suited
to light, sandy or gravelly soil, but
on soil moist or loamy it grows very
readily and produces large and
profitable crops. In wet seasons
fine crops have been known to be
produced upon gravelly soil, but
with a dry spring and early sum
mer it is hardly worth growing. Vn
one respect timothy is greatly in
ferior to some other varieties, that
is, in the quantity of its aftermath,
especially if allowed to stand until
too ripe and then mowed in a dry
time. It starts so slowly as to
leave the ground exposed to the
scorching rays of. the sun, unless
there happens to ne a rapid growth
of clover to protect it.
The Red Top, or as it is called
in the Middle States, herd grass,
should be sown upon all fields in
tended for pasture, and, though
common to all, it is especially suit
ed on moist soil ; it makes on such
soils a good, permanent grass for
permanent pastures. It should be
fed close, for if allowed to grow up
to seed the cattle refuse it, and the
fact would seem to show that it is
not so well relished bv stock as
some other grasses.
Orchard Grass is pronounced by
Flint as one of the most valuable
and widely known of all the pasture
grasses. W e have tor years oeen
endeavoring to have the grass more
generally introduced among our
farmers in this section, and we are
gratified in knowing that it as well
as lucerne, and miller and Hunga
rian gras3 are being now very gen
erally adopted among the tarmers
of the Middle and Southern States.
We have noticed in one of the
agricultural journals of this State
that a iarmer ot Jfrince George
county has this season cut off three
acres of this grass, sown with oats
in the spring of 1873, near eight
tons of hav. . It is considered less
exhausting to the land than timothy"
and will endure considerable shade;
in a porous soil its fibrous roots
extend to a great depth; it is not
recommended as suitable for lawn
grass, if or a soiling grass it is
most excellent, and some of the
most successful dairy farmers at the
North give it the highest character
for its good qualities for this pur
pose. It is also a most abiding
grass, and is probably better
adapted than any other to sow with
clover in the spring, and other seeds
for permanent pasture or tor hay
It is fit to cot with clover, as it
ripens about the same, and makes a
valuable mixture with red clover to
cut in the blossom for hay, and
grows remarkably quick when crop
ped by cattle; five or six days in
summer sumces to give a gooa Dite:
all kinds of stock (at it greedily
whn green, and sheep will pass
over ever other kind of grass :o feed
upon it suffered to grow long with
out being cropped it becomes coarse
and harsh. Its rapidity of growth,
the luxuriance of its ufui math, and
its power of enduring the cropping
of cattle, commend it highly to the
farmers' use, especially as a pasture
grass. Judge Buel, in hi day,
said of this grass, 11 I should prefer
it to almost every other grass"
and Colonel Powell, an eminent
farmer cf Pennsylvania, after grow
ing it for ten years, declares that
it produces more pasture than any
ot her gras he has seen in America.
Mr. Sanders, the well-known stoel;
breeder of Kentucky, says that his
observation and experience has
induced him to rely mainly on
orchard grass and red clever, and
that he now, indeed, sows no other
kind of grass seed; these mixed
make the best hay of al! the grasses
for his climate, being nutritious and
well adapted as feed for stock.
Orchard grass is ready for grazing
in the spring ten or twelve days
sooner than any other that afiords
a full bite; ant! when grazed down
and the stock turned off it will be
ready for rejrazing in less than
half the the time required for
Kentucky blue grass, vlnother
advantage is afforded by it it stands
a severe drought better than any
other grass, and keeps green and
growing when other sorts are dried
up. In fine, it is one of the most
common grasses of English natural
pastures, on rich, deep moist soils,
and on its introduction into England,
which accurred from Virginia in
1774, it became an object of special
interest among cattle feeders, hav
ing been found to be exceedingly
palatable to stock of all kinds.
June Grass or Kentucky Blue
Grass 13 another most valuable of
the grasses : it varies much in size
and appearance, according to the
soil on which it grows. AVhen in
tended for hay it should be cut at
the time of flowering, as, if the
seed is allowed to ripen, a great
part of its value is lost. After be
ing cut in the smmer, it starts up
slowly; it produces but one flower,
ing stem in a year, while many
other grasses continue to shoot up
flower stems, and run to seed through
the season. On this account it is
highly recommended as one of the
main grasses for lawns. It will
grow well on rather a dry soil, but
will grow on variety ot soils, irom
the dryest knoll to the wet meadow,
but does not stand a severe drought
as well as some other grasses. In
Kentucky it obtains its highest per
fection, and continues luxuriant
through their mild winter. It
requires two or three years to be
come well set, and it does not arrive
at perfection as a pasture grass till
the sward is older than that, and
hence it is not suited to alternate
husbandry, or where the land is to
remain in grass two or three years
and then be ploughedup. Baltimore
American.
S3T WHO WILL BETRAY II1S TARTY,
INSULT HIS PEOPLE, STIGMATIZE
HIMSELF AND AID IN ESTABLISH
ING NEGRO SUPREMACY, BY VOTING
FOR OR SIGNING THE BOND OF A
CU'IL R1GHTER .'
SQUILLS SEES THE COMET.
And Mrs. Squills Goes One Better.
For some cause or tho other too
numerous to mention, Squills was
late in going home the other night.
Perhaps it was morning. On
second thought, it was morning.
Squills had been sitting up with a
sick friend, as usual, and the heat
of the room or something hadn't
agreed with him. His friend wan
ted him to stay all night, but Mrs.
Squills had an objection to his
staying out all night. Mrs. Squills
wa3 not a jealous woman, but she
had once been heard to remark,
darkly, that she would like to catch
Mr. Squills staying out all night.
From that moment Squills had
relinquished the idea. On this
particular occasion Sqnills never
felt so much like staying out all
night en a door step in al his life.
The room had disagreed with him
so much. But he struggled man
fully with the effects of the room,
combined with the effort of sitting
up with his sick friend, and he
reached home at last.
Mrs. Squills was awake. Once
upon a time Squills used to take off
his shoes and go up softly in his
stockings, but he had left off that
base subterfuge years ago. Mrs.
Squills was always awake. She
was awake this night as usual
Squills knew it, because she didn't
snore.
" Is that you, Squills?"
" That is the question she asks
me year in and year out," said
Squills,looking at me with the eye
of a lynx from under the mosquito
bar, and knowing enough of me to
know my hide on a bush, if she
should ever see it on a bush, she
said mildly, " I3 that you Squills?"
"I tell you," said Squills, "tfcat
kind ot thing is wearing, bu:
responded cheerily :
"'Yes, my dear; excuse me.'"
" What time is it? Is it late?"
I " Jos struck twel', Missiz
At which slit- immediate) v gjt
out ot her nest walked delib- rutelv
to the iiiantk hcll, lo..kcl :.t ihe
clock, and then, turning n und, s;iid,
in tones that would have given a
chill to an iceburg :
"Mr. Squills, it v.i-tits just u
quarter to three."
I said : "Let it want, iu' dear."
' Where have you been, Mr.
Squills? sitting up with a sick
friend ?
1 know the " Sick Iptt.d" wns
too thin to hold wattr with the
remarkable female, sa !
so I said :
"Codger's comic, in'
quills, and
love.'
" The coders's
SmiilUV"
what,
Mr,
j y .
"Codger's comic. Meters mo'
won' ful'n Judy. Fiery, untamed
tail ever s'long. liran', s'b'ime,
tooral maguicent. Nevajaw such
thii.gamlife, give tn'word nhonor."
" I felt that the influence of tho
sick friend and the oppressive heat
of that last bottle of soda water was
upon me," said Squills, "and I also
felt that Mrs. Squill's eye was upon
me; indeed, I felt that Mrs. Squills
was all eyes, and that they were all
beaming on me at one fell swoop,
like a policeman's bull's-cc."
" Before I call in the children,
Squills, to witness the bea-tly effect
of Codger's comet on their father,"
said Mrs. Squills, "you had better
get into that bed."
" And then what do you think
she did ?" said Sqoills. "But you'd
never guess. No, sir, no earthly
man could ever guess the depth of
that woman's knowledge of human
nature. She poured out a glass of
ice water from the ice pitcher and
then deliberately went out on the
porch and threw the balance out in
the yard. Then she sat down by
the window and sucked the water in
the glass through a straw." " I
never felt so thirsty in my life,"
said Squills, "and she knew it, and
then to suck up that water through
a straw. There was a majestic
malignity in the act that couldn't
possibly have originated with any
body but a woman."
" I don't know how I went to
sleep." said Squills, "but I did,
and when I woke up in the morning
there were Mrs. Squills at tho bed
side with a cup of hot coffee."
" lake this, fequills. its better
than ice water for Codger's comic."
" Whatcould I say," said Squills.
'Just nothing. I wa3 comoletelv
at her mercy, and that cup of coffee
is goinir to cost me a new dress be--
-
fore I get through with that infer-
ai comet, and J know it.
3T WHO WILL BETRAY HIS TASTY,
INSULT HIS PEOPLE, STIGMATIZE
HIMSELF AND AID IN ESTABLISH
ING NEGRO SUPREMACY, BY VOTING
FOR OR SIGNING THE BOND OF A
CIVIL RIGHTElt ?
Aaron Burr.
Henry Ward Beecher says :
Aaron Burr was a keener thinker
than George Washington. He was
a far more ingenious man, a more
active man, and, if he had been a
moral man, and maintained normal
relations with his fellow man, and
with the Iaw3 of rectitude, he would
have been an abler man. Wash
ington was a man of good sensc,but
he was not a man of genius in any
direction, except that of conscience.
lie was a man of singular equity,
great disinterestedness, and of pure
and upright intent. Sagacious ho
was, by a light which came from
integrity. He endured, having
faith to believe that right was right,
and that it was safe, and that in the
end right would prevail. That
which made Washington the only
great hero of our revolutionary
struggle was the light of the moral
element that was in him not any
intellectual genius which he pos
sessed, or any remarkable executive
power. And if you look back on
the names in our history that have
stood the test, you will find that
they have been men who were fruit
ful in the highest moral element.
And as time goes on, those men
who lack these elements, sink low
er and lower till they set below the
horizon ; and those who possess
them to rise higher, until they
reach the meridian, with undying
splendor, to same upon history and
the world.
A School for All.
When I look upon the tombs of
the great, every emotion of envy
dies ; when I read the epitaph of
the beautiful, every inordinate de
sire forsakes me ; when I meet with
the grief of parents upon a tomb
stone, my heart melts with compas
sion ; when I see the tombs of the
parents themselves, I reflect how
vain it is to grieve for those whom
we must quickly follow ; when I
see kings lying beside those who
deposed them, when I behold rival
wits placed side by side, or the holy
men who divided the world with
their contests and disputes, I reflect
with astonishment on the frivolous
competitions, factions, and debates
of mankind.
WHO WILL BETRAY HIS PARTY
INSULT HIS PEOPLE, STIGMATIZE
HIMSELF AND AID IN ESTABLISH
ING NEGRO SUPREMACY, BY VOTING
FOR OR SIGNING THE BOND OF A
CIVIL RIGEIER ?
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