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The hydraulic press. (North San Juan, Nev. Co., Cal.) 1858-18??, August 21, 1858, Image 1

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Volume i.
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS,
Is Published every Saturday,
By AVERY & WATERS.
B. P. AVBRT, TB. W. WATER*.
on Main Streeopposite the Smla Firtorg,
Nkrth Stn Juts, Nevada Co., Cal
Terms.
Tear .in *5 00 |
'&im Months 3 OO
\\retsionVu... ; 8 00
Copiet.:.:. .85
All papers will be stopped at the end of the term
paid, nnless renewed by the subscriber.
Advortisius.
of twelve lines, one insertion 03 00
*)tack sabse>inontinsertion .1 50
Vdverkisemonta of a personal nature, doable the above
'rate*.
•A liberal dcdnctlon made to regular monthly and quar
terly advertisers. Advertisements may be changed
■once a month without extra Charge.
'49*AH advertising most be paid for in Advance.
«Tob Printing.
We have in connection with the Newspaper, a «Tol>
‘Ofllet, complete in all its departments, an 1 capable of
'executing every description of Job Work with neatness
Accuracy and dispatch, upon the most reasonable terms.
49-.VO WORK DELIVERED UNTIL PAID FOR
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
R. H. FARQUHAR,
TU3TICE OF THE PEACE,BRIDGEPORT
r fj Township. Office, next door to Weiss’ Billiard Sa-
Huon, Main street, San Joan. 1 tt
J. B. JOHNSON,
“fDSTtCE OF THE PEACE, OFFICE. IN
MJ Jndge Stidgur's Law Office, Main street, North
Jhhti. Itf
O. P. STIDGER,
Attorney at law, notary Rublic
and Conveyancer. Office on the north side of Main
>treot, one door west of Seawell & Son’s store, opposite
•the Pioneer. FORTH SAN JUA2*. ,
Nov. 13, 1857. ' 1 1m
Wm. F. AM DERSOY,
Attorney and CownselAot- at taw,
< OrnC*...lu Alban's Brick Building. corner of Broad and
Pine streets, Nevada. 213 m
tonrer msuekith ~ .thomas p. hawitt
MEREDITH A HAWLEY,
Attorneys at Law,
NEVADA CITY. C\L. 15 3m
'OM. W. TANT 1 DAVID BEUIEN
BELHEY &. IA\T.
A T T'O R.V E Y S AT LA W,
particular attention given to prr-dtrrlne D. S. lamd War
rants for persons by Militarybervice entitled to
the same, i
4, second story of Alban's Brick Building,
Corner Broad and Pine stprtrts. NEVADA. 21
’ITA-VTOV BVCKNER S3.|. C. WILSON HILL.
BECKYEH & HILL,
HAVING associated themlei res together in the
practice of the Law, wiK a! ten t promptly to all
tmsincss confided to their care in Nevada and adjoinin;
ton n ties.
Orrice—ln Kelsey's Brick Budding, Commercial
■Street, Nevada.
Api*il 8,1858. 21 Sm
-b. ». M’CON!Tn.U . A.C sh.es
McCOMELL & lILES,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law,
\fill practice in all the Courts of the 11th Judicial Dis
trict, and in the Supreme Court.
OPtlCE—Kidd's Brick Building, up stairs. 21 Sra
G. W. NOBLE.
PHYSICIAJST AJVD SURGE GEE
dAct, Sfrfn steeet. nearly opposite the Drug .Store. 15cy
B. S. OE.DS, M. £>.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON--OFFICE,
at Moore's Hotel, Moore’s Plat. 4tf
BUSINESS CARDS.
B. LEVISON,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
THE BEST HAVANA AND AMERICAN
CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
Cutlery, Stationery, and
FANCY GOODS
All of which will be sold at iitv prices, for cash.
Main street, opposite Flume street, North San Juan
J. W. SULLIVAN’S
•GREAT PACIFIC EMPORIUM,
AND
Central Agency of Periodical Literature,
AND SOLI! sfiENT FOR
“THE CALIFORNIA TRUE DELTA”
KJdifomxa Bouton Journal , Missouri Republican, Cin
cinnati! Commercial, -V. I". Courier des EtaU Unis,
Nen York Herald, Tribune and Times.
•Ac., At., Ac.
WASHINOTON STBIET, NEXT TO TflE TOST OFFICE,
San Francisco.
ECKMAN, TENNENT & CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
PROVISIONS, LIQUORS,
MUSTERS’ TOOLS , CLOTHING,
BOOTS, SHOES, FLOUR, GRAIN, Sfc.
Cornier First and Commercial its.,
MARYSVILLE,
Bare constantly on hand a large and well selected
oboceriesT provisions
Aleo every variety of
CASS GOODS,
Cnmprtoine a complete assortment well adapted to the
’TRADE, which they offer for sale at lowest market
•S. Orders from the Interior will be
l«majptly and faithfully executed, .
LADIES SHOES.
CHOICE lot of Ladies gaiters, slippers, ai
, for sale by A. SPERLING.
To Miners.
„ are prepared furnish any articles not usual
ly kept in the stores in this place.at TWO
PATS HOTICE i such as Anvils. Blocks, Ropes,
relieve. Iloee, and every article wanted.
* ’ PACK A GOLEV-
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS.
SALOONS & LIQUOR STORES.
BILLIARDS, 2r» CTS. A GAME!
San Juan Exchange
C. SCHARDIN &. CO.,
HAVING purchased the interest, of
John Woods in the above San Juan Exchange,and I
made large additions and improvements, the Saloon
now compares favorably with any in the Mountains.
Three Billiard Tables,
In first-rate order—two of them new Marble Beds
and equal to any in the State. The wood bed is the fa
vorite of the place.
It is the intention of the proprietor to use every exer
tion to make the Exchange the favorite resort of all
seekers of healthy pleasurable exercise.
THEBAR
will be furnished with the very best
WIXES AND LIQUORS
To be had in the San Francisco Market, and no pains
will be spared to make everything pleasant and attrac
tive. 10
Liquors at Wholesale and Retail.
A. D. LABASSEE*S
Bank Exchange*
CORNER OF MAIN AND FLUME STREETS,
NORTH SAN JUAN.
This splendid Saloon having been recent
ly re-fitted in the most elegant style, is now
open for the accommodation of the pnblic.
The subscribers Will be happy at all times
to meet their friends and the public gener
ally, and by strict attention to business, are confident
of making the
BANK EXCHANGE
the most desirable place of resort in the mountains.
THE BAR
will at all times be supplied with the best Liquors,
Wines, Ale and Porter,
ahd CIGARS that the market affords.
A. I). LABASSE &CO.
®3r*iVincß and Liqhorsfor Medicinal purpo
ses, equal to any in the State, and superior to uuy
Drug store articles in the mountains.
*SjO A choice lot of
California Wines,
now of. hand. A. D. L.
April Ist, 1858. 20mytf
Largest Stock in the Mountains.
Pioneer Liquor Store.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
OPPOSITE FR ■ NK SMITH’S TIN SHOP, MAIN STrKKT.
de-
THE subscriber having refitted and refurnished
the above store, is now prepared with a large and
complete stock of
Wines, Liqiuora, Ale and Porter
of the best quality, and at as *.
Low Prictt, W-7(o?eSirf • UHa-4. at Vten i
** .. «. >■.... v AJt-
All Orders promptly attended to, a ,;d
livered free of chains. .
CALIFORNIA WINE,
OREGON CIDER,
and a v»rl.l r of choice beverages, always on band and
for sale by the case, bottle or glass.
The Pioneer Liquor Store is one of the oldest estab
lishments of the kind in this vicinity, and the proprie
tor expects by close attention to business, to create for
it an increased popularity. I). KRAFT.
North Sun Joan, April 2d, 1858. 20mytf
Hurrah for Sweetland
lew Saloon.
AD. LARASSEE, of the Bank Excbafigf
• Sart Jntm having taken the large new hnihlini
at .'sweetland. opposite Dan rials’ old store, is entirel
refitting it. and will op' n. during the week,a first clas
DfiINSAINC* SALOON,
for th i.-c.oTumo.'. ition of gentlemen in that ricinitj
lie will always keep on band U»
BF- ! OF LIQUORS AND CIGAuR.
-■ ' . par Otii mev : att.-mlant to mix
v vim';- Fancy Drinks to order
I; jm ncMve of the public is respectfully solicited.
Sweetland, July 16, 1858. ’ 35my
C. E. UEi.FRICH,
Soda Water Manufacturer,
(TfT\ DEALER IX FINE BRANDIES,
Wines. Ale. Porter &c.
fe jS3»t4 Brandies, of the following brands:
Old Sazerac, OtSrd, Jbles, Robin & Co., United Tine
yards. Martellc, CUampaigne, Otard, Ac., 4c.
Philadelphia and Holland Gin,
Old Tom, Santa Cmz and Jamaica Bum. Monongahela,
Bourbon. Irish and Scotch Whiskey:
Ileidsick, Schreidor ami Morizotte Champa! gnn;
Port, Sherry, Ginger. Hock. Sauteme Claret Wipes.
Assorted Case Liquors,
and SYRUPS.
Ills extensive stock is now complete in every depart
ment, and will be offered at the most
Reasonable Prices.
Safi Jftaa North, Nov. 17, 1857.
[1 3m]
C. SCHAPtDIN & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Wines, Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco.
Also— a general assortment of
FRESH AND DRIED FRUITS,
And Confectionery.
This cool and delicions beverage is kept on band i
ring the siinimt. iimuiim
SOUTH SIDE OF MA N STREE
Forth San Juan, For. 17,1857.
El Dorado Saloon*
D street, Marysville,
BILLIARDS!' BILLIARDS!!
2S cents a Game!
BUST OF
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGAR:
28 3m ROGER KtELY, Prop
LIQUOR STORE.
THOMAS .CALLIGAN, .
...Wholesale Dealer in...*
Wines & Liquors*
High st., bet. First *nd Second,
MARYSVILLE. *
HAVING opened a wholesale and retail Wine
and Liquor Store, as abovq, he begs to inform his
friend, snd the pnblic that he will keep constantly on
band articles of the best quality. 27*. ,
NORTH SAN JUAN, NEVADA CO., CAL., SATURDAY, AUG. 21. 1858.
Poet ry.
J#s“The following lines, by Wa. Witter, ore copied
cm the Boston Transcript :—
There hangs a star in the western sky—
Merrily blows the wind by night!
It twinkles and glows ike an ange ’seye.
And the sky is blue and the snow is white—
And merrily blows the wind by night!
’Tie the star of Love that T gaze on there—
Merrily blows the wind by night!
And it speaks to my heart of the good and fair
That forever and ever have left my sight:
Ah I drearily sobs the wind by night!
Some in the grave-yard lie asleep—
Merrily blows the wind by night!
Over them snows are drifted deep,
Cold as their bones, and pure and white—
But merri y blows the wind by night!
And some there are whose haughty hearts
Are frozen hard with shame and sin:
No tone of music e'er departs,
No ray of sunlight enters in:
Cold like the snow, lint not so white—
While merrily blows the wind by night 1
And one there is whose gentle eyes
Seem yet to thrill me from afar;
Whose memory in my bosom lies
As the pure ight of that cold star,
Phe loved me once—but woman is light,
Changeful and false as the snow so white —
And merrily blows the wind by night!
This life of ours is wi d unrest,
And light and shadow and joy anil woe;
And then the sod is over us prest.
And merrily on the winds do blow.
And the self-same stars that shine to-night
Will shine on our graves when we are gone,
Ahd the snow will cover ns, tranquil and white,
AVhile the musical winds blow merrily on.
For the sky is blue and the snow is white—
And merrily blows the wind by night!
Shine on. thon beautiful star, shine on.
In thy brilliant beauty, bold ami bright I
For the world in darkness waits the dawn—
And merri y blows the Wind by night!
Let hearts grow co d that once wore glad,
And eyes, obce bright, grow dim and sad,
And cheeks turn pale, and slow decay
And fever waste our forms away;
Yet, in thy radiant home above,
Shine on—and hear us talk of lovel
Shine on o'er all the ghastly sight.
And hark to the wind that sings by night—
To the jolly old wind that sings by night!
For the sky is blue and the snow is white—
And merrilj- blows the wind by night!
[ Original.]
LOG CABIN INKLINGS.
No. I.
Night—once more night; and af
ter another day delving in the soil
for gold, I eit smoking nay friendly,
constant pipe b 4 the log cabin door.
The pines art* sounding their an
cient anthem wl|ere they stand upon
thv its j^ugh,
.% breast bchiiM u»y lonely dwell-
JPg f in the cohohig
canon theptu^fr? ~> rr ■'"■"nyi j| x p
the pines wilh'Jiftcr my^taxmtig.
The Hiyri» f ' crickets nog their
plaintive music tjc-vrigb t..>. -/avr. air;
lull throated sop ids fha dore;*jjQrn
plaiuiug notes, t id solemnly the owl
cries oat, tu-whji ! tu-wbo !
The night air* robs with sound,and
toy heart beats a ,diWy each second’s
requiem as I lisjfn. ———
Heaven stnilcs upon no fairer land
than this, desp’to its social ills, and
day after day for many years I have
comforted my soul with its beauties.
Each lonely night for years I have
looked forth into the starry abyss from
this rude hut, or gazed into the dan
cing flames shaping themselves to hu
man likenesses and picturing the past
that may not live again.
Let me not speak of that.
If the past robs us of many joys,
it also buries in its final oblivion much
that is better not to be ; and it is a
sickly sentiment that would summon
its ghostly memories to darken the
sunshine of the present.
Retrospection, when not tinctured
by feeble lamentations, but only soft
ened by a natural regret for what
was good, may be a healthy mental
employment, for it can make ua mas
ters of wisdom. How much better it
is for me, that I can sit here, alone,
but for the company of my own free
soul which has her secret guests, and
Calmly think on what I used to feel!
If the flight of years brings quiet
and clear insight to the mind that
knew them not before, —if we can
look down upon our buried joys and
find our grief for them is also dead—
if we can do this, and yet look toward
the future with a cheerful gaze, fear
ing no foe, not even death—what need
we covet more ?
One troop of elfin hopes, that
danced along the pathway of ray
early years, is buried now, or van
ished into nothingness with the dream
that inspired them.
Another dream—the dream of
wealth, has also fled—thank God for
that I All the enchantment it threw
around sordidness has been dissipated
by experience. The poetry of gold
hunting—what a monstrous idea !
has fallen from tho thing it covered,
like the silver veil of the impostor
prophet, and I can now see the mean
est passion of mankind in all its de
formity, and hate it, too.
Henceforth, whilst still pursuing
the only avocation my own folly has
left me, I would sometimes work in
other mines ; would try to touch some
chord of sympathy in other breasts,
to send one beating heart to rest with
better thoughts.
Deeds, earnest deeds are best, but
earnest words may have a power too.
I shall attempt nothing ambitious—
nothing forced or labored.
A pleasant book—something beau
tiful in nature, where all is beautiful
—a stray waif of song, rude but sin
cere—-recollections of the past, per
haps, and yearnings of the ever pres
ent;—these shall be my themes, with
whatever else future whim may sug
gest, or future emotion call up.
The mental labor necessary to the
execution of this unmethodical plan,
will be a source of relaxation and im
provement, both of which I need.
The son of toil suffers mentally as
well as physically, when deprived of
all occupation for his leisure moments
—not many, alas! ’Tis well, me*
thinks, for man to be compelled to
work, yet it were better if he could
find more time to think. There is
more to be extracted from the soil
than means for subsistence. Poets
have sighed for a life in which labor
and intellectual recreation might be
happily blended ; as Cowper says :
“ Hint robust, tough sinews, bred to toil,
“ Servile employ : but such as may amuse,
“ Not tire, demanding rather ski 1 than force.”
Such a life—spent with nature, as
Cowley always desired, would be de
lightful after one had overcome the
constitutional habits produced by se
vere muscular exertion; but such a
life can not be mine.
is ray aim to forget
“Business, that contradiction of my fate,”
when not actually employed in it; at
the end of the day to ignore all that
is sordid, and indulge, as circumstan
ces may permit, in whatever is refined
■and elevating*,
>i.t may seem too egotistic, th;s note
rr i-va with wsffp hut Tis an egotism
l|beva: I
sfa ■ r>-
tions, wrest die vate
} loneliness would
or it could we not
i) feelings,
irbially said to be
onfided to another
i have the habit of
>us emotions and
reflections which employ our silent
souls, if their tendency should prove
corroding it will be neutralized by
expression.
But I am not selfish, I speak for
sympathy.
It is the nature of a noble joy
To be unselfish. Oft the swelling heart
Some portion of its gladness would impart.
If language such as tuneful bards employ,
Without the dross of common place alloy,
Obedient from the teeming brain would start.
The eyes may speak a volume; they may dart
Their lightning glances—sccretest convoy
For am'rous messages, yet not conv.iy
The thoughts that thicken in the struggling soul,
Bom of some lofty mood or lovely day.
These, to be fell, must hare their silence broken,
Must leave the 'imits of one mind's control
And bo in fitting language fitly spoken.
I can say of this habit of literary
expression, with all humility, as Cole
ridge said of poetry, that it has been
to me its own exceeding great reward;
it has soothed my afflictions; it has
multiplied and refined my enjoyments;
it has endeared solitude; and it has
given me the habit of wishing to dis
cover the good and the beautiful in
all that meets and surrounds me.”
Goethe says—“ Cultivate the beau
tifuJ, the useful will cultivate itself.”
The useful certainly more constantly
and efficiently recommends itself for
cultivation to our utilitarian natures,
than the beau.iful, which has to be
t con to our hearts, though abounding
everywhere else. Heaven grant that
“the almighty dollar,” as Irving has
it, may never grow into such magni
tude before my vision as to shut out
perception of the beautiful.
The grave, says Irving, buries ev
ery error-—covers every defeat—ex*
linguistics every resentment. From
its peaceful bosom springs none but
fond regrets and tender recollections*
Who can look down even upon the
grave of an enemy, and not feel a
compunctious throb, that he should
have warred with the poor handful of
earth that lies mouldering bofore him?
J. W. Scobey is now the editor of
the Placer Press*
Educate the Idiot.
Under this title the N'. T. Tribune
gives an interesting sketch of the no
ble efforts which have been made du
ring this century to alleviate the con
dition of the insane and idiotic. Wo
give the best portion of the article in
question, but our readers will find a
touching account of Guggenbuhl’s
first labors for the wretched Cretins,
in the February number of the At
lantic Monthly:
It is in the by-tv aVs and not the
highways of history, in the paths
aside from the military roads over
which historians generally delight to
conduct the stately march of their
events, with blocks and gibbets and
racks and fagots at easy intervals to
diversify the scene, that we have
learned to see that the race has made
some progress and has gone forward,
and set up here and there a monu
ment to record it. Perhaps there is
no better sign of a real advancement
in civilization in modern over ancient
times than that displayed in the differ
ent treatment the most unfortunate of
human beings receive now from what
they did once, and that not long ago.
T • 7 • i O O
It is comparatively hut lately that
systematic and scientific efforts have
been made toward mitigating the lot
of those to whom or rather
human sins and errors, had denied the
blessing of reason or of the special
senses.
Three "quarters of a century ago,
insane persons were the objects of su
perstitioos terror, and were treated
with the! cruelty wlgicb naturally
springs fear in vulgar minds.—
And insanity was regarled by persons
even of pore than average intelli
gence, a lundred yeav since, as the
evidence of demoniacal possession.—
It is clear,from Cowogga cosrespond
v unhappy
poet an-: :irs.jUfiwin, Whose
name >.s In* as long as
bfe ■" > * -v J oil o IS of lon, the hard*
Ifl&ded ol|| fi’aVc*-*ratal* turned par
son, beliewd th«i hil madness was
.caused fwfeir«ct di%S®icalagency.—
Straw, and darkness, and chains, and
whips, were the chief Iremedies then
imagined Is fit for a toiod diseased.
The only (bought seeped to be to put
these occasions of terror where they
could do no mischief. Cure was
scarcely • thought of |s a possibility,
except by a snj>erna:fral operation of
Divine power. Bedlam was One of
the sights of Loudon, and the private
madhouses were' the scenes of the
most horrid barbarities. Dr. Charles
Cotton, whose minor proems are still
admitted into the collections, was the
first person in England we remember
who undertook the treatmentof luna
tics on humane and philosophical
principles, about a century ago. It
was Cowper’s good fortune to fall in
to the benevolent hands of this wise
and good roan, to whom he owed his
partial restoration, and we all owe
his delightful poems and incomparable
letters. Afterward Dr. Willis, bro’t
before the public by his connection
with King George lll.’s madness,
drew general attention to the possibil
ity of an improved treatment of tl||s
fearful disease-. This humane appli
cation of science received a great
impulse in France at the lime of the
French Revolution, and much of its
present advanced state is owing to the
wise humanity of the French physi
cians.
It was not until after the insane
had received the blessings of science
thus informed by benevolence, that
the blind, the deaf and dnmb and the
idiotic wt-re sought out and comforted.
They were left, formerly, as a gener
al thing, helpless and hopeloss bur
dens on the charity of friends or on
the world. The idea of making these
unfortunates happy in themselves,and
useful to others, is one of compara
tively recent conception, and yet
abundant provision has been long made
for the wants and the improvement of
the two former classes. The idiotic
were left last of all, hopeless victims
to their wretched fate, of which hap
pily they were the least conscious of
the three. It is but about ten years
since any systematic effort was made
in their behalf in this country, and but
little more than twice that time since
the labors Seguing
NUMBER I.
Saegert, and other science philan
thropists, were directed in Europe to
this field of benevolence. The atten
tion of the public wa« first called to
this subject hero, we believe, by # Dr.
Samuel G. Howe, whose life has £ecn
a continued service of humanity and
freedom, who procured a small appro
priation from the Legislature of Mas
sachusetts and began an experiment
on a small scale at the Blind Asylum,
of whkh he is the Superintendent.
From this, a permanent establishment
has grown, though not on so large a
scale, nor with the advantages of po
sition, that might be desired and ex
pected from the wealth and intelli
gent benevolence of the Bay State.
The next public attempt in this direc
tion, and by much the most consider
able made in this country, was that c
this State, commenced in Troy an
now permanently established in Sy
racuse. The liberality with w :
this charity has been promoted • y on:
law-makers at Albany is by no m?
the least creditable of their cor ■ '
characteristics. Dr, 11. B. V um.n
the Superintendent, has concck
idea of a movement of tuis kind :
the same time that Dr. Howe L:
his endeavors, and he commence ]
experiments in a private way ai Be
Massachusetts. His success k
his selection as the Superintendent
our State institution, which his ski; -
and happy labors have fully jastih
Beautiful Imaginings.—A r
‘cent traveler gives an account t
when he was walking on tho bear •
of Brazil, he overtook a colored \v
man with a tray on her head. Bein.
asked what she had to soli, ska Jftjv
ered tho tray, and with reverent ten
derness uncovered it. It was the
lifeless form of her babe, covered with
a new white robe, with a garland
around the head, and flowers within
the little hands that lay upon its bo
som.
“Is that your child?” asked the
traveler.
“It was mine a few days ago,”
she replied; “but the Madonna has
it for her angel now.” a
“How beautifully you have laid it
out,” said he.
“Ah!” she added cheerfully/* what
is that to the bright wings she wears
in Heaven?”
The Noblbbi Duty.— No advo
cate oan assume a nobler duty than
the defense of the poor man’s rights.
The honest laborer at his toil deserves
all that careful and liberal legislation
can bestow; he deserves infinitely
more than the rich man, for there is,
notwithstanding general equality, a
power in wealth that will guard and
protect its possessors without the aid
of tho legislation which is necessary
for others. It is certain that tho
most protection granted to those in
laborious pursuits, will produco the
most prosperity and happiness. — Si
err a Citizen.
A bright and beautiful bird is
Hope. It will come to us amid the
darkness, and sing the sweetest songs
when our spirits are saddest; and
when the lone soul is weary, and longs
to pass away, it warbles its sunniest
notes and tightens the slender fibres
of our hearts that grief has been
wearing away.
The good man’s heart is tn ;
soil from which springs every beauti
ful and loving thing. He is oheerfu
and gay. He wears the coronrl <
spring, composed of every beauty a ,
every hue. These spring from h
childlike simplicity and innoeeuc
He is benevolent and good. H *
works done, and doing, manifest h
benevolence and goodness. 1 nest-.
united with his cheerfulness an . - y
ety, mark the genuine Christian.
Hesperian,
“Would you like to subscribe [
‘Dickens’ Household Words?” inquir
ed a sombre-looking magazine agent
“Household words have played the
dickens with me long enough,” was
the feeling reply of the henpecked
husband.
* ■ '
Fare to Fraser.—The prices of
passage on the clipper ship Oracle to
Victoria, wore— Steerage; $25; cab
in, $5O. This vessel sailed on Mot?"
dajr.

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